0

Consider the following code using Google Test. Note that I have not added any tests at all.

// File main.cpp

#include <gtest/gtest.h>

using ::testing::InitGoogleTest;

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    InitGoogleTest( &argc, argv );
    std::cerr << "INITIAL ERRNO " << errno << std::endl;
    int result = RUN_ALL_TESTS();
    std::cerr << "FINAL ERRNO " << errno << std::endl;
    return result;
}

I can compile this with:

g++ main.cpp -o test -I/path/to/googletest/1.8.0/include/ -lgtest -L/path/to/googletest/1.8.0/lib/

(I'm using g++ version 6.1.0 and googletest version 1.8.0.)

Executing test gives me

% ./test
INITIAL ERRNO 0
[==========] Running 0 tests from 0 test cases.
[==========] 0 tests from 0 test cases ran. (0 ms total)
[  PASSED  ] 0 tests.
FINAL ERRNO 0

However, piping the results of this execution into less (or piping to view - or redirecting to a file) gives

% ./test |& less
INITIAL ERRNO 0
[==========] Running 0 tests from 0 test cases.
[==========] 0 tests from 0 test cases ran. (0 ms total)
[  PASSED  ] 0 tests.
FINAL ERRNO 22

(It appears that the critical redirect here is stdout. Redirecting stderr alone does not cause a problem.)

On my system, 22 corresponds to EINVAL.

What is happening here? I understand that gtest absorbs stdout from the main execution, but it also writes to stdout, so there should be an open pipe from the stdout of test to the stdin of less. Is there something obvious I'm missing here?

Note: I am writing in C++11, but I occasionally need to use the bare C interface for things that (in C++17 and later) would be handled by std::filesystem, which is how I noticed that errno is being set. I have heard that setting errno to zero before calling functions that might set it is recommended by some people to prevent these kinds of issues, and I may adopt that practice (depending on the comments I get in response), but I'd still like to understand what's going on here.

  • I assume Google Test does some operation on stdout that is allowed when stdout goes to an interactive terminal but not when stdout goes to a file or a pipe. Try running both commands under strace and compare the results. But why do you care? – rveerd Mar 14 at 15:44
  • @rveerd I just prefer to take the time to understand things that surprise me. I haven't used strace before, so I'll try that. Thanks! – sasquires Mar 14 at 23:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.