3

How can I create a quadrilateral with css, when I know which degree each corner has.

I already tried to recreate a quadrilateral I have with transform and skew.

However, this does not work really well.

This is what I try to archive.

enter image description here

The exact requirements are:

A div with this as background in one color. On the image are just construction lines. It should be a solid quadrilateral with these angles.

This was my first idea:

transform: rotate(-45deg) skew(27.5deg, 62.5deg)
transform-origin: top center;
  • Above picture doesn't seems to be a square. A square should have 4 equal sides, all sides are equal in length, every angle is 90 degree. – shihab Mar 13 at 18:06
  • I am sorry. Square was the translation of "Viereck". I am not a native english speaker. So maybe I meant "quadrilateral" – Noim Mar 13 at 18:08
  • I can see that left and right angle is 53 degree each. How much is the bottom angle? I'm asking because it seems overwritten & not clear. Is it 250 degree? – shihab Mar 13 at 18:12
  • 62.5. And the sum of course is 125. They are not 100% exact, because I extracted them from an image. Of course the sum of all angles (If you split the quadrilateral into 4 triangles) needs to be equal 180. 26 + 90 + 62.5 =~ 180 – Noim Mar 13 at 18:17
  • 1
    I totally forgot, the punctuation in english is different. Updated the image with better readable numbers. – Noim Mar 13 at 18:26
2

I would consider multiple background to achieve this where I simply need to find the width/height of the element. Based on your illustration we have this:

enter image description here

From this we can have the following formula:

tan(alpha) = W/H

and

tan(beta/2) = H/W

We only need to use one of them and you will notice that there isn't one solution which is logical as you simply need to keep a ratio between H and W and the width of our element will simply be 2*W and its height 2*H.

Since H/W is also the same as 2*H/2*W we can simply consider that width = tan(alpha)*height

.box {
  height:var(--h);
  width:calc(1.92098213 * var(--h)); /* tan(62.5)xH */
  background:
   linear-gradient(to bottom right,transparent 49%,red 50%) top left,
   linear-gradient(to top    right,transparent 49%,red 50%) bottom left,
   linear-gradient(to bottom left ,transparent 49%,red 50%) top right,
   linear-gradient(to top    left ,transparent 49%,red 50%) bottom right;
  background-size:50% 50%;
  background-repeat:no-repeat;
}
<div class="box" style="--h:50px;"></div>

<div class="box" style="--h:100px;"></div>

<div class="box" style="--h:200px;"></div>

You can adjust the gradient if you want only borders:

.box {
  height:var(--h);
  width:calc(1.92098213 * var(--h)); /* tan(62.5)xH */
  background:
   linear-gradient(to bottom right,transparent 49%,red 50%,transparent calc(50% + 2px)) top left,
   linear-gradient(to top    right,transparent 49%,red 50%,transparent calc(50% + 2px)) bottom left,
   linear-gradient(to bottom left ,transparent 49%,red 50%,transparent calc(50% + 2px)) top right,
   linear-gradient(to top    left ,transparent 49%,red 50%,transparent calc(50% + 2px))  bottom right;
  background-size:50% 50%;
  background-repeat:no-repeat;
}
<div class="box" style="--h:50px;"></div>

<div class="box" style="--h:100px;"></div>

<div class="box" style="--h:200px;"></div>


Using transform the idea is to rely on rotateX() in order to visually decrease the height to keep the formula defined previously. So we start by having Width=height (a square) then we rotate like below:

enter image description here

This is a view from the side. The green is our rotated element and the red the initial one. It's clear that we will see the height H1 after performing the rotation and we have this formula:

cos(angle) = H1/H

And we aleardy have tan(alpha)=W/H1 so we will have

cos(angle) = W/(H*tan(alpha)) 

and H=W since we defined a square initially so we will have cos(angle) = 1/tan(alpha) --> angle = cos-1(1/tan(alpha))

.box {
  width:150px;
  height:150px;
  background:red;
  margin:50px;
  transform:rotateX(58.63017731deg) rotate(45deg); /* cos-1(0.52056)*/
}
<div class="box">

</div>

We can also apply the same logic using rotateY() to update the width in the situation where you will have beta bigger than 90deg and alpha smaller than 45deg. In this case we will have W < H and the rotateX() won't help us.

The math can easily confirm this. when alpha is smaller than 45deg tan(alpha) will be smaller than 1 thus 1/tan(alpha) will bigger than 1 and cos is only defined between [-1 1] so there is no angle we can use with rotateX()

Here is an animation to illustrate:

.box {
  width:100px;
  height:100px;
  display:inline-block;
  background:red;
  margin:50px;
  animation:change 5s linear infinite alternate;
}
.alt {
  animation:change-alt 5s linear infinite alternate;
}

@keyframes change {
  from{transform:rotateX(0) rotate(45deg)}
  to{  transform:rotateX(90deg) rotate(45deg)}
}
@keyframes change-alt {
  from{transform:rotateY(0) rotate(45deg)}
  to{  transform:rotateY(90deg) rotate(45deg)}
}
<div class="box">

</div>

<div class="box alt">

</div>

  • Thanks! This nearly perfect. At least it answers the question perfectly. However, is there a way to use border-radius or imitate it? – Noim Mar 13 at 19:49
  • 1
    @Noim I am adding another way ;) give me 5min – Temani Afif Mar 13 at 19:51
  • @Noim check the update, with the new method you can add radius easily ;) – Temani Afif Mar 13 at 20:02
1

In various way you can do it. Since you're trying to use degree value so here I can give you an example: first of you can take four lines for your rectangle and rotate them as you want with degree value. Here is what I mean:

<div class="top_line"></div>
<div class="right_line"></div>
<div class="bottom_line"></div>
<div class="left_line"></div>

Css

.top_line { height: 170px; border-right: 1px solid yellow; transform: rotate(50deg);
  position: absolute; top: 140px; left: 400px; transform-origin: 0% 130%; }
.right_line {height: 140px; border-right: 1px solid red; transform: rotate(130deg);
  position: absolute; top: 140px; left: 500px; transform-origin: 0% 50%; }
.bottom_line { height: 140px; border-right: 1px solid green; transform: rotate(130deg);
  position: absolute; top: 140px; left: 400px; transform-origin: -1800% 80%; }
.left_line { height: 140px; border-right: 1px solid blue; transform: rotate(50deg);
  position: absolute; top: 140px; left: 400px; }

Here is the live preview

  • Thanks. I understand what you made and how, however, it does not really fit my goal (At least I think). I try to recreate a solid surface with this shape, not exactly the construction lines from the image. – Noim Mar 13 at 19:36

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