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I am trying to understand pointers in C particularly in relation to arrays.

I have the following code (and the following code only) in my main method:

int a[] = {1,2,3,4,5}, *pa; // initialise int array and pointer to it
pa = &a; 
while (*pa != '\0') printf("%d", *pa++); // print each element. Stop at null

However, this will return me

1 2 3 4 5 32766 -38993714 -1393010551 -398542376 32766 1799511769 32767 1799511769 32767 

Rather than the simple '1 2 3 4 5 ' I am after.

I thought that the final element of an initialised array automatically became '\0'? Can anyone tell me what the 9 outputs following '5' are and why my condition to end the while-loop is not sufficient? I understand that this may not be the optimal way to iteratively print array elements - I am just trying to understand what is happening under the good and familiarising myself with using pointers. I could not find similar questions

Thank you.

  • 1
    Where did you get the idea a is nul terminated? – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Mar 14 '19 at 12:51
  • You may want to read this one as well. – PM 77-1 Mar 14 '19 at 12:55
  • Thank you for the comments and the reference - I see that I mistakenly understood array initialisations. – rick Mar 14 '19 at 12:55
  • You probably got something mixed up - if you initialize an array using a string literal it's going to be null-terminated. So char a[] = { "Hello" };, for instance. But not char a[] = { 'H', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o' }; or int a[] = {1,2,3,4,5}, only string literals. – Blaze Mar 14 '19 at 12:58
  • @Blaze yes got, thanks for clarifying – rick Mar 17 '19 at 1:57

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