21

I need a few lines of Java code that run a command x percent of the time at random.

psuedocode:

boolean x = true 10% of cases.

if(x){
  System.out.println("you got lucky");
}
31

You just need something like this:

Random rand = new Random();

if (rand.nextInt(10) == 0) {
    System.out.println("you got lucky");
}

Here's a full example that measures it:

import java.util.Random;

public class Rand10 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Random rand = new Random();
        int lucky = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
            if (rand.nextInt(10) == 0) {
                lucky++;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(lucky); // you'll get a number close to 100000
    }
}

If you want something like 34% you could use rand.nextInt(100) < 34.

28

If by time you mean times that the code is being executed, so that you want something, inside a code block, that is executed 10% of the times the whole block is executed you can just do something like:

Random r = new Random();

...
void yourFunction()
{
  float chance = r.nextFloat();

  if (chance <= 0.10f)
    doSomethingLucky();
}

Of course 0.10f stands for 10% but you can adjust it. Like every PRNG algorithm this works by average usage. You won't get near to 10% unless yourFunction() is called a reasonable amount of times.

8
  • 3
    Because nextFloat() can result in zero, the comparison should be strictly less than. In other words, use < instead of <=. Of course, it would be a lot easier to reason correctly about the code if you used nextInt(10) instead of a float.
    – erickson
    Apr 1 '11 at 18:19
  • 2
    That's incorrect. It's just a wrong assumption, floats are not exact numbers so using a strict comparison in this situation won't change anything, also because the random sequence is generated from int values. I challenge you to provide a snippet that shows that using just < operator yields a more correct (near to 10%) result :)
    – Jack
    Apr 1 '11 at 19:09
  • 1
    Okay, I grant that in the specific case of 10%, the relation doesn't matter. But what about 50%? Or 75%? My point was that for general correctness, you should use < not <=.
    – erickson
    Apr 1 '11 at 19:40
  • 1
    @erickson: there's not going to be an appreciable difference between < and <= for comparing any float here. Let's take 50% for example. You're very rarely going to get exactly 0.5f out of nextFloat() since we're dealing with 32 random bits for the float. While it would be wrong to use nextInt(10) <= 5 for 50% like you're getting at, the float case is much more like nextInt(1000000000) <= 500000000. It won't be statistically noticeable because you're rarely going to hit 500000000 for the equals in <= to matter. Apr 2 '11 at 4:20
  • I just tested it for fun over the whole range from 0.01 to 0.99 with 0.01 steps, 1000 tries each probability value with 1 million tosses and never got a difference. Probably if you use a chabce that can be fully expressed with a binary float could have a tiny chance of being different but not sure about it..
    – Jack
    Apr 2 '11 at 13:32
3

To take your code as a base, you could simply do it like that:

if(Math.random() < 0.1){
  System.out.println("you got lucky");
}

FYI Math.random() uses a static instance of Random

2

You can use Random. You may want to seed it, but the default is often sufficient.

Random random = new Random();
int nextInt = random.nextInt(10);
if (nextInt == 0) {
    // happens 10% of the time...
}
1

You could try this:


public class MakeItXPercentOfTimes{

    public boolean returnBoolean(int x){
        if((int)(Math.random()*101) <= x){ 
            return true; //Returns true x percent of times.
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[]pps){
        boolean x = returnBoolean(10); //Ten percent of times returns true.
        if(x){
            System.out.println("You got lucky");
        }
    }
}
1
  • This is problematic, you should never cast the result of a call to .random() to an int, as you will introduce non-random biases. Instead use the appropriate methods of Random, such as .nextInt() which handle those biases correctly.
    – dimo414
    Sep 29 '14 at 23:02
0

You have to define "time" first, since 10% is a relative measure...

E.g. x is true every 5 seconds.

Or you could use a random number generator that samples uniformly from 1 to 10 and always do something if he samples a "1".

0

You could always generate a random number (by default it is between 0 and 1 I believe) and check if it is <= .1, again this is not uniformly random....

0
public static boolean getRandPercent(int percent) {
    Random rand = new Random();
    return rand.nextInt(100) <= percent;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.