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I have a Celery worker process that was started with this command:

celery multi start worker --app=xyz.celery --queue="xyz"
--pidfile="/var/run/xyz/%n.pid"
--pool=gevent --concurrency=500 --time-limit=1800

I have tasks which are safe for gevent concurrency, but not for OS threads, and I'm seeing an intermittent error that suggests they're being run by multiple OS threads.

Looking at the worker process, it appears to have 7 threads in total:

$ ps -ef | grep "celery worker"
nobody   26577     1  0 Mar06 ?        00:46:43 /usr/bin/python -m celery worker
--time-limit=1800 --concurrency=500 --pool=gevent --app=xyz.celery
--queue=xyz --pidfile=/var/run/xyz/xyz-worker.service.pid --hostname=worker@xyz

$ cat /proc/26577/status
Name:   python
...
...
Threads:    7
...

(I can also see via ps -T or via htop that the worker has these 7 threads)

On other servers where I have a similar setup, I have 4 threads instead of 7. I can't figure out what controls this. I don't see anything in the Celery documentation that explains it.

All my servers have 4 cpus, so it's clearly not that. From everything I've read, it should be just one thread, since I've told it to use gevent for concurrency.

Why does it use more than 1, what determines the number, and how can I control it?

  • From further debugging, I've discovered that the threads appear to be getting created by gevent (gevent.threadpool). The gevent ThreadPool object is instantiated with a maximum size of 10. This value is hard coded in gevent.hub. Since this is the default behavior of gevent, I suppose this means that code written to run with gevent needs to be thread-safe? – John B Mar 15 '19 at 17:07
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It turns out that these threads are maintained by gevent but they're not used to run user code:

By default, gevent will create threads to handle DNS resolution in a cooperative fashion (invisibly to the caller). gevent will never run user code in a separate thread implicitly without being explicitly instructed to do so by direct usage of a thread pool

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