7

I have seen this code in a coding platform to efficiently calculate the euler's totient for different values. I am not being able to understand this implementation. I really want to learn this. Could anyone please help me explain this?

for(int i = 1; i < Maxn; i++) { // phi[1....n] in n * log(n)
   phi[i] += i;
   for(int j = 2 * i; j < Maxn; j += i) {
      phi[j] -= phi[i]; 
   }
}
  • 1
    Is there some reason this has the wolfram-mathematica tag? That isn't Mathematica code. – Bill Mar 14 at 20:10
6

First, lets note that for prime values p, phi(p) = p - 1. This should be fairly intuitive, because all numbers less than a prime must be coprime to said prime. So then we start into our outer for loop:

for(int i = 1; i < Maxn; i++) { // phi[1....n] in n * log(n)
   phi[i] += i;

Here we add the value of i to phi(i). For the prime case, this means we need phi(i) to equal -1 beforehand, and all other phi(i) must be adjusted further to account for the number of coprime integers. Focusing on the prime case, lets convince ourselves that these do equal -1.

If we step through the loop, at case i=1, we'll end up iterating over all other elements in our inner loop, subtracting 1.

   for(int j = 2 * i; j < Maxn; j += i) {
      phi[j] -= phi[i]; 
   }

For any other values to be subtracted j must equal the prime p. But that would require j = 2 * i + i * k to equal p, for some iteration k. That cannot be, because 2 * i + i * k == i * (2 + k) implying that p can be divided evenly by i, which it cannot (since its prime). Thus, all phi(p) = p - 1.

For non-prime i, we need to subtract out the number of coprime integers. We do this in the inner for loop. Reusing the formula from before, if i divides j, we get j / i = (2 + k). So every value less than i can be multiplied by (2 + k) to be less than j, yet have a common factor of (2 + k) with j (thus, not coprime).

However, if we subtracted out (i - 1) multiples containing (2 + k) factors, we'd count the same factors multiple times. Instead, we only count those which are coprime to i, or in other words phi(i). Thus, we are left with phi(x) = x - phi(factor_a) - phi(factor_b) ... to account for all the (2 + k_factor) multiples of coprimes less than said factor, which now share a factor of (2 + k_factor) with x.

Putting this into code gives us exactly what you have above:

for(int i = 1; i < Maxn; i++) { // phi[1....n] in n * log(n)
   phi[i] += i;
   for(int j = 2 * i; j < Maxn; j += i) {
      phi[j] -= phi[i]; 
   }
}
1

By the way, just out of interest, there's also an O(n) algorithm to achieve the same. We know Euler's product formula for the totient is

phi(n) = n * product(
  (p - 1) / p)

  where p is a distinct prime that divide n

For example,

phi(18) = 18 * (
  (2-1)/2 * (3-1)/3)

        = 18 * 2/6
        = 18 * 1/3

  = 6

Now consider a number m = n * p for some prime p.

phi(n) = n * product(
  (p' - 1) / p')

  where p' is a distinct prime that divide n

If p divides n, since p already appears in the calculation for phi(n), we do not need to add it to the product section, rather we just add it to the initial multiplier

phi(m) = phi(p * n) = p * n * product(
  (p' - 1) / p')

       = p * phi(n)

Otherwise, if p does not divide n, we need to use the new prime,

phi(m) = phi(p * n) = p * n * product(
  (p' - 1) / p') * (p - 1) / p

       = p * (p - 1) / p * n * product(
  (p' - 1) / p')

       = (p - 1) * phi(n)

Either way, we can calculate the totient of a number multiplied by a prime only from the prime and the number's own totient, which can be aggregated in O(n) by repeatedly multiplying the numbers we've generated so far by the next prime we find until we reach Maxn. We find the next prime by incrementing an index to the successor we haven't recorded a totient for (prime generation here is a benefit).

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