1

I try do adhere DDD principles on C# collections see more here

And I notice that the model builder method for initial seed HasData relies on the Add Method of ICollection. There is any way to circumvent or trick that method when is called from database update / migrate process?

All I had done until now to trick it follows this path.

1) Create a wrapper around the ICollection named ReadOnlyKollection

2) Have a private ICollection on the model, to avoid exposing to the outside world the collection.

3) Expose the wraper making obsolete Add and some other methods that will trow NotImplementedException if used.

However still the Add method despite of the obsolete warning could be used since is still public and needed for the seed HasData method used on update / migrate database process.

I am thinking on at least restrict the calling methods from inside the Add method of the wrapper class.

I could be good to know the calling member when HasData would run and allow only this Method to process and throw an exception for any other.

Notice that CallerMethodName compile-type feature can't be used since will break the ICollectoion interface contract..

Any ideas to avoid Exposing Private Collection Properties to Entity Framework following DDD principles? (and still have the enhancement of HasData method to update / migrate database process). see some code below..

public interface IReadOnlyKollection<T> : ICollection<T>
{
}

public class ReadOnlyKollection<T> : IReadOnlyKollection<T>
{
    private readonly ICollection<T> _collection;

    public ReadOnlyKollection(ICollection<T> collection)
    {
        _collection = collection;
    }

    public int Count => _collection.Count;
    public bool IsReadOnly => _collection.IsReadOnly;

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() => GetEnumerator();
    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() => _collection.GetEnumerator();

    public bool Contains(T item) => _collection.Contains(item);
    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex) => _collection.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);

    [Obsolete]
    public void Add(T item) => _collection.Add(item); // CallerMethodName trick to be applied here or ??

    [Obsolete] 
    public void Clear() => throw new NotImplementedException();

    [Obsolete] 
    public bool Remove(T item) => throw new NotImplementedException();
}

public class StateProvince
{
    public StateProvince() //EF Constructor
    {
    }

    public StateProvince(string id, string name)
    : this(name)
    {
        Id = id;
    }

    public string Id { get; protected set; }
    public string Name { get; protected set; }

    public string CountryRegionId { get; protected set; }
    public virtual CountryRegion CountryRegion { get; protected set; }
}

public class CountryRegion
{
    public CountryRegion() //EF Constructor
    {
    }

    public CountryRegion(string id, string name)
    : this(name)
    {
        Id = id;
    }

    public string Id { get; protected set; }
    public string Name { get; protected set; }

    private readonly ICollection<StateProvince> _stateProvinces = new List<StateProvince>(); // Private collection for DDD usage
    public IReadOnlyKollection<StateProvince> StateProvinces => new ReadOnlyKollection<StateProvince>(_stateProvinces); // Public like read only collection public immutable exposure
}


EntityTypeBuilder<StateProvince> // Code reduced for brevity

builder.HasIndex(e => e.CountryRegionId);
builder.Property(e => e.Id).IsUnicode(false).HasMaxLength(3).ValueGeneratedNever();
builder.Property(e => e.CountryRegionId).IsRequired().IsUnicode(false).HasMaxLength(3);
builder.Property(e => e.Name).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(50);


EntityTypeBuilder<CountryRegion> builder // Code reduced for brevity

builder.Property(e => e.Id).IsUnicode(false).HasMaxLength(3).ValueGeneratedNever();
builder.Property(e => e.Name).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(50);

builder.HasMany(e => e.StateProvinces)
    .WithOne(e => e.CountryRegion)
    .HasForeignKey(e => e.CountryRegionId)
    .IsRequired()
    .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Restrict);

builder.HasData(GetData())  

private static object[] GetData()
{   
    return new object[]
    {
        new { Id = "AF", Name = "Afghanistan", IsDeleted = false, LastModified = DateTimeOffset.UtcNow  },
        new { Id = "AL", Name = "Albania", IsDeleted = false, LastModified = DateTimeOffset.UtcNow  },
        new { Id = "DZ", Name = "Algeria", IsDeleted = false, LastModified = DateTimeOffset.UtcNow  },
        new { Id = "AS", Name = "American Samoa", IsDeleted = false, LastModified = DateTimeOffset.UtcNow  },
  • 4
    Not resolving your problem, but just saying: DDD domain objects should be clean of any framework technology. You should probably load/save EF entities in your command handler and transform them into your DDD aggregate/entity classes. If you try to use them for both you're up for trouble. – D.R. Mar 14 '19 at 22:33
  • +1 on D.R.'s response. Entities represent the data and shouldn't be purposed beyond that. A lot of examples out there have entities being passed around like DTOs and ViewModels. I do use DDD principles in my Entities by using Internal Setters, and exposing methods to perform state changes, however I do so to promote DDD rather than try and force developers to conform to it. Ultimately developers should adopt a pattern because it adds value and they will when they see it demonstrated rather than working with attempts to dictate it. – Steve Py Mar 15 '19 at 2:22
  • You are right on saying DDD domain objects should be clean of any framework. However I am trying to have a "pragmatic" approach to DDD. For "pragmatic" approach I mean to adhere what is beneficial for my project without having to implement all the "dogmas" of DDD. ;-) (For example I would still expose some internal details like foreign keys on my models for code simplicity) – alhpe Mar 15 '19 at 12:37
6

The linked post is for EF6, while HasData method indicates EF Core. And in EF Core the things are much simpler and do not need any tricks in that regard.

  • EF Core does not require ICollection<T> for collection navigation property. Any public property returning IEnumerable<T> or derived interface / class is discovered by convention as collection navigation property. Hence you can safely expose your collections as IEnumerable<T>, IReadOnlyCollection<T>, IReadOnlyList<T> etc.

  • EF Core does not require property setter because it can be configured to use the backing field directly.

Additionally, there is no need of special "EF Constructor" because EF Core supports constructors with parameters.

With that being said, you don't need a custom collection interface / class. The sample model could be like this:

public class CountryRegion
{
    public CountryRegion(string name) => Name = name;    
    public CountryRegion(string id, string name) : this(name) => Id = id;

    public string Id { get; protected set; }
    public string Name { get; protected set; }

    private readonly List<StateProvince> _stateProvinces = new List<StateProvince>(); // Private collection for DDD usage
    public IReadOnlyCollection<StateProvince> StateProvinces => _stateProvinces.AsReadOnly(); // Public like read only collection public immutable exposure
}

public class StateProvince
{
    public StateProvince(string name) => Name = name;
    public StateProvince(string id, string name) : this(name) => Id = id;

    public string Id { get; protected set; }
    public string Name { get; protected set; }

    public string CountryRegionId { get; protected set; }
    public virtual CountryRegion CountryRegion { get; protected set; }
}

and add either the following (simplest - for all properties of all entities)

modelBuilder.UsePropertyAccessMode(PropertyAccessMode.Field);    

or for all properties of CountryRegion

builder.UsePropertyAccessMode(PropertyAccessMode.Field);

or just for that navigation property

builder.HasMany(e => e.StateProvinces)
    .WithOne(e => e.CountryRegion)
    .HasForeignKey(e => e.CountryRegionId)
    .IsRequired()
    .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Restrict)
    .Metadata.PrincipalToDependent.SetPropertyAccessMode(PropertyAccessMode.Field);

And that's all. You'll be able to use all EF Core functionality like Include / ThenInclude, "navigating" inside LINQ to Entities queries etc. (including HasData). The backing filed allows EF Core to add/remove elements when needed, or even replace the whole collection (in case the field is not readonly).

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks a lot. Tested and working. Many thanks for your deep explanation about those concept and how to combine them effectively working. Many many thanks. Really appreciated from my side. (Can you please consider to have a look on another EF core related question I posted here: stackoverflow.com/questions/54999120/… I would really appreciate to find a workaround for it) – alhpe Mar 15 '19 at 11:43

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