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How can we convert the following anonymous lambda functions to regular functions so that I can define and the variables mu, B0, D0?

alpha,beta,loc,scale = stats.beta.fit(value)  

error=(scale/(1.96))**2

gpdf = lambda B0, mu, sigma2: 1/np.sqrt(2*pi*sigma2)*np.exp(-1/2*((B0-mu)**2)/sigma2)
approx_sigma2 = lambda scale: (scale/(1.96))**2
ggpdf_v  = lambda B0, D0, error: gpdf(B0, mu=0.8, sigma2=error) * (D0 < 3) + (D0 >= 3) * gpdf(B0, mu=0.5, sigma2=error)
ggpdf_r  = lambda B0, D0, error: gpdf(B0, mu=0.5, sigma2=error)
ggpdf_c  = lambda B0, D0, error: gpdf(B0, mu=0.7, sigma2=error)
ggpdf_v  = lambda B0, D0, error: gpdf(B0, mu=0.9, sigma2=error)


ggpdf_v2(B0, D0, error):
    return gpdf(B0, mu >= 0.9, sigma2 = error)

closed as unclear what you're asking by MSeifert, Daniel Roseman, juanpa.arrivillaga, Bazingaa, gnat Mar 15 at 8:39

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  • What exactly is the problem you are encountering? – juanpa.arrivillaga Mar 14 at 21:36
  • 1
    "Lambda functions" are regular functions; a lambda expression is just one way to create a function object. – chepner Mar 14 at 21:37
  • 2
    Converting a lambda to a regular function has no effect at all on how you define the parameters you pass to it. – Daniel Roseman Mar 14 at 21:37
2
gpdf = lambda B0, mu, sigma2: 1/np.sqrt(2*pi*sigma2)*np.exp(-1/2*((B0-mu)**2)/sigma2)

is equivalent to:

def gpdf(B0, mu, sigma2):
    return 1/np.sqrt(2*pi*sigma2)*np.exp(-1/2*((B0-mu)**2)/sigma2)

In both cases you call it in the same way with gpdf(B0, mu, sigma2) so it shouldn't make a difference.

  • when I do mu>=0.9 in the last function, I am getting NameError: name 'mu' is not defined. How can we define for the value of mu to be >=0.9 either inside or outside the function? – Brown Mar 14 at 22:53
  • Can you post your code so that we can recreate the error? – dzang Mar 15 at 7:48
  • Thank you. I have added the snippet to the question. ggpdf_v2(B0, D0, error): return gpdf(B0, mu >= 0.9, sigma2 = error) – Brown Mar 15 at 10:22
  • You are getting that error because when you try to pass mu >= 0.9 python tries to evaluate it as a boolean expression, e.g. is mu greater or equal than 0.9. Since mu is not declared anywhere before it raises the error. That way of passing a parameter is wrong, it should be mu=0.9. You need to assign a specific value. What is the behavior that you expect? The code should try all the real values from 0.9 to infinity? – dzang Mar 15 at 14:28
  • Yes i get that. I want to assign a number >=0.9 and <=1. i tried to declared mu outside of the function but no luck. – Brown Mar 15 at 15:14
0

You mean like this?

alpha, beta, loc, scale = stats.beta.fit(value)

error = (scale / (1.96))**2 

def gdpf (B0, mu, sigma2):
    return 1 / np.sqrt(2 * pi * sigma2) * np.exp(-1 / 2 * ((B0-mu)**2) / sigma2)

def approx_sigma2(scale):
    return (scale / (1.96))**2

def ggpdf_v(B0, D0, error):
    return gpdf(B0, 0.8, error) * (D0 < 3) + (D0 >= 3) * gpdf(B0, 0.5, error)

def ggpdf_r(B0, D0, error):
    return gpdf(B0, 0.5, error) 

def ggpdf_c(B0, D0, error):
    return gpdf(B0, 0.7, error) 

ggpdf_v(B0, D0, error):
    return gpdf(B0, 0.9, error)
  • Yes but when I do mu>=0.9 in the last function, I am getting NameError: name 'mu' is not defined – Brown Mar 14 at 22:03
  • Edited. Better now? – Maneren Mar 14 at 22:28
  • but how can I make the last one as >=0.9? That's the problem – Brown Mar 14 at 22:34
  • @Brown this has already been explained to you in your other question: stackoverflow.com/questions/55171597/… – juanpa.arrivillaga Mar 14 at 22:38
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga, I saw your excellent comment and I upvote it but i still couldn't get this error right. I am sorry, I am from the statistics background. – Brown Mar 14 at 22:42

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