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I am trying to implement a program in python which reads from 4 different files, changes the data and writes it to another file.

Currently I am attempting to read and change the data with 4 different processes to speed up the runtime.

I have already tried to use manager.list, but this makes the script slower than sequential.

Is it possible to share a List between processes or to make each process return a list and extend a list in the main process with those lists?

Thanks

The code looks like this (currently myLists stays empty, so nothing is written to the output.csv):

from multiprocessing import Process
import queue
import time 

myLists=[[],[],[],[]]
myProcesses = []


def readAndList(filename,myList):
    with open(filename,"r") as file:
        content = file.read().split(":")
        file.close()
        j=1
        filmid=content[0]
        while j<len(content):
            for entry in content[j].split("\n"):
                if len(entry)>10:
                    print(entry)
                    myList.append(filmid+","+entry+"\n")
                else:
                    if len(entry)>0:
                        filmid=entry
            j+=1

if __name__ == '__main__':
    start=time.time()
    endList=[]
    i=1
    for loopList in myLists:
        myProcesses.append(Process(target=readAndList,args=("combined_data_"+str(i)+".txt",loopList)))
        i+=1
    for process in myProcesses:
        process.start()
    for process in myProcesses:
        process.join()

    k=0
    while k<4:
        endList.extend(myLists[k])
        k+=1

    with open("output.csv","w") as outputFile:
            outputFile.write(''.join(endList))
            outputFile.flush()
            outputFile.close()  

    end = time.time()
    print(end-start)
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Try to use a modern way.

As an example..

Assuming that we have several files that store numbers, like

1
2
3
4

and so on.

This example greps them from the file and combines into the list of lists, so you can merge them as you want. The example uses semaphores to limit the number of parallel reads (4). I use python 3.7.2, it should work in 3.7 as well, but I'm not sure.

Code

#!/usr/bin/python3
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

from asyncio import Semaphore, ensure_future, gather, run

limit = 4


async def read(file_list):
    tasks = list()
    result = None

    sem = Semaphore(limit)

    for file in file_list:
        task = ensure_future(read_bounded(file, sem))
        tasks.append(task)

        result = await gather(*tasks)

    return result


async def read_bounded(file, sem):
    async with sem:
        return await read_one(file)


async def read_one(file):

    result = list()
    with open(file, 'r+') as f:
        for line in f.readlines():
            result.append(int(line[:-1]))

    return result


if __name__ == '__main__':

    files = ['1', '2', '3', '4']

    res = run(read(files))

    print(res)

Output

[[1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [6, 7, 8, 9, 10], [11, 12, 13, 14, 15], [16, 17, 18, 19, 20]]

I think this approach is much faster and easier to read. This example can be extended to grepping data from WEB, you can read the info about it here

Asyncio and aiohttp are really great tools. I recommend trying them.

  • Thank you! This works very well. By using your example I managed to reduce the runtime by about 15 Seconds. Is there anything else I could do to improve on that? – Alex4224 Mar 15 at 8:05
  • I don't know actually. I assume that there is a lot of ways improving file reading and other logic, like working with lists and so on. But i don't think that it will reduce time a lot. Most performance problems in python related to GIL, so asyncio is best of all to resolve multiprocessing problems related to it. But if u will find something else, please, report here) Anyway, try to remove semaphore block, read_bounded. It will help a little bit. – Dmitrii Mar 15 at 8:56

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