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Wondering how to write GLSL functions that can take different kinds of arguments.

From my understanding, in GLSL a * b can be called for vec2 * vec2, vec2 * vec3, ..., vec2 * mat3, etc. For probably dozens of combinations. I'm wondering how to write this as a function though, to get a better understanding of the language.

Wondering if you need to actually write out every combination:

vec2
multiply(vec2 a, vec2 b) {
  return a * b
}

vec3
multiply(vec3 a, vec3 b) {
  return a * b
}

....

Or if you can write one function that handles them all:

vec or mat
multiply(a, b) {
  return a * b
}

Not sure how it works. Maybe they all need different names:

vec2
multiplyv2(vec2 a, vec2 b) {
  return a * b
}

vec3
multiplyv3(vec3 a, vec3 b) {
  return a * b
}

....

Update:

First part is solved:

vec2 rotate(vec2 v, float angle) {
  return rotation2d(angle) * v;
}

vec3 rotate(vec3 v, vec3 axis, float angle) {
  return (rotation3d(axis, angle) * vec4(v, 1.0)).xyz;
}

You can overload functions.

1

GLSL doesn't have templates or generics so you can't get the compiler to generate instances of the function for different types automatically for you. However as you've discovered, it does support function overloading, so you can reduce the code duplication using a macro to instantiate the same function for different types like so.

#define MULTIPLY_TEMPLATE(type) \
    type multiply(type a, type b) { \
        return a * b; \
    }

MULTIPLY_TEMPLATE(vec2)
MULTIPLY_TEMPLATE(vec3)
MULTIPLY_TEMPLATE(vec4)
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  • that is nice but since the * operation will be a custom one (I assume) then this will not help as yours calls the native * one ... passing a function pointer makes no sense as that would mean having custom functions for each type ... may be passing the multiplication as a macro parameter will help but not sure if that is possible in GLSL ... – Spektre 2 days ago
  • I'm afraid I don't follow you. GLSL supports neither operator overloading or function pointers. Can you give an example of the kind of case you're describing? – Laurie 2 days ago
  • that is more or less my point ... if the function multiply uses just * then the whole stuff is obsolete (as native GLSL code already has that impleneted) so I am assuming instead of * there will be a code (possibly multiline and slightly different for each type) and your current macro does not cover that. maybe something like MULTIPLY_TEMPLATE(vec4,some_inline_code) but I am not sure if that would be possible in GLSL (my bet is no) – Spektre yesterday
  • I see. I read the question differently. I thought the whole point was that the code was generic except for the types, and the question was whether they could avoid duplicating all the code just to change the types. If the code itself must be different, then I don't understand what the question is asking. – Laurie yesterday
  • I read/understand it in the same way , but my coding experience tells me otherwise... – Spektre yesterday

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