0

I have two programs below trying to draw a ball on a yellow screen. One where my surface object is being filled outside of the while loop, and one that is being filled inside of the while loop.

When I have .fill() outside the while loop my image gets redrawn when I try to move it. So when the image goes down, it draws a duplicate image just 10 pixels further down the screen.

When I have .fill() inside the while loop my single image gets updated and redrawn to a new location.

Why is this?

Non-trailing code:

import pygame
import sys

length = 1200
width = 800


screen = pygame.display.set_mode((length, width))
screen_rect = screen.get_rect()

ball = pygame.image.load('ball.bmp')
ball_rect = ball.get_rect()
ball_rect.y = ball_rect.width
ball_rect.x = screen_rect.centerx


while True: 
    screen.fill((255, 255, 103))

    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            sys.exit()
        elif event.type == pygame.KEYDOWN:
            if event.key == pygame.K_RIGHT:
                ball_rect.y += 15

    screen.blit(ball, ball_rect)
    pygame.display.flip()

Trailing Image Code:

import pygame
import sys

length = 1200
width = 800


screen = pygame.display.set_mode((length, width))
screen_rect = screen.get_rect()
screen.fill((255, 255, 103))

ball = pygame.image.load('ball.bmp')
ball_rect = ball.get_rect()
ball_rect.y = ball_rect.width
ball_rect.x = screen_rect.centerx


while True: 


    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            sys.exit()
        elif event.type == pygame.KEYDOWN:
            if event.key == pygame.K_RIGHT:
                ball_rect.y += 15

    screen.blit(ball, ball_rect)
    pygame.display.flip()

enter image description here

New contributor
Connor is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
1

The linked code (image) does not produce the effect you describe. In the left side, no updates are made to the screen at all. On the right side, the only update made is the screen.fill() of yellow.

So hypothetically speaking ...

A PyGame program can be thought of as a type of animation. During the main loop, there is typically a block for handling user-input, calls to update positions of on-screen objects, and calls to update, that is "re-paint" the screen.

Each "frame" of this animation is constructed with a background, plus typically some overlaid objects. These might be things like a player-bitmaps, combatant bitmaps, play-field items, text scores & statuses, etc. Generally the background is painted first, then the overlaid items. Once the screen is drawn, the movement of the objects is calculated for the next display, it's re-drawn, and again & again...

The first situation the question describes is one where the screen is updated in a manner such that the previous "frame" of the animation has not been cleared away, and the user sees a composite of the previous and current display.

The second situation erases the entire display first, with the screen.fill(). Thus removing any trace of the previous frame. This is a typical handling.

There is yet another way. This method keeps track of where the screen has been changed, and only the specific area that needs updating is re-painted. This approach can potentially provide a much more efficient input-update-paint cycle, because it is not re-drawing items that have not changed.

  • The left code trails my image and the right code does not trail the image. But I think I understand what you are saying. Essentially, I have redraw the background every time there is movement from any of the overlaid objects? – Connor Mar 15 at 22:09
  • Also - what is the other way that you describe? – Connor Mar 15 at 22:09
  • Yes, pretty much, every frame - paint the background, paint the game objects. Repeat. The third way uses a concept generally known as "dirty" rectangles. The part of the screen nedding updates is considered "dirty". There's a short tutorial here - n0nick.github.io/blog/2012/06/03/… – Kingsley 2 days ago

Your Answer

Connor is a new contributor. Be nice, and check out our Code of Conduct.

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.