-1

I have a large dataframe similar to the toy dataset created below

df<-data.frame("ID"=c("A", "A", "A", "A", "A", "B", "B", "B", "B", "B"), 
'A_Frequency'=c(1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5), 'A_Axis'=c(1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5))

The dataframe consists of an ID column and a two columns A_Frequency and A_Axis. I have created a column called A_Slope and filled it using the following for loop

id1<-unique(df$ID)###########Create list of unique IDs to subset the dataframe

In this loop we calculate A_Slope value such that the values are calculated subsetting the dataframe df by unique id and then, the values are calculated from the second row to the last row, ignoring the first row in all cases

for( j in id1){
for( i in 2:nrow(df[df$ID==df$ID[df$ID%in%j],])){
df$A_Slope[df$ID==df$ID[df$ID%in%j]][i]=10*log(2, 
10)*log((df$A_Axis[df$ID==df$ID[df$ID%in%j]][i])/

(df$A_Axis[df$ID==df$ID[df$ID%in%j]][i-1]), base = 
10)/log((df$A_Frequency[df$ID==df$ID[df$ID%in%j]] 
[i])/(df$A_Frequency[df$ID==df$ID[df$ID%in%j]][i-1]),base = 10 )}}

This works well for the toy set. I have a large dataframe with multiple columns. is it possible to use dplyr to do the same using mutate.

Expected Output

        ID A_Frequency A_Axis     A_Slope
     1   A           1      1          NA
     2   A           2      2 3.010299957
     3   A           3      3 3.010299957
     4   A           4      4 3.010299957
     5   A           5      5 3.010299957
     6   B           1      1          NA
     7   B           2      2 3.010299957
     8   B           3      3 3.010299957
     9   B           4      4 3.010299957
     10  B           5      5 3.010299957

Note : the two NA values in A_Slope column can be zero also- not necessrily NA

  • Can you update your post with expected output for the toy example ? – Ronak Shah Mar 15 at 4:15
  • Have made the edit as requested – marcia akshaya Leo Mar 15 at 4:18
  • Can you please explain what the rules are for calculating A_Slope? I struggle to de-convolute your code, which unfortunately is not very readable due the lack of any indentation/whitespace/formatting. – Maurits Evers Mar 15 at 4:20
  • The term slope is just a name- not to be confused with dy/df in calculus. Will add few comments – marcia akshaya Leo Mar 15 at 4:24
1

Hopefully I have translated your code correctly.

library(dplyr)

df %>%
  group_by(ID) %>%
  mutate(A_Slope = 10 * log10(2) * log10(A_Axis/lag(A_Axis))/
                                    log10(A_Frequency/lag(A_Frequency)))


#  ID    A_Frequency A_Axis A_Slope
#  <fct>       <dbl>  <dbl>   <dbl>
# 1 A               1      1    NA   
# 2 A               2      2    3.01
# 3 A               3      3    3.01
# 4 A               4      4    3.01
# 5 A               5      5    3.01
# 6 B               1      1    NA   
# 7 B               2      2    3.01
# 8 B               3      3    3.01
# 9 B               4      4    3.01
#10 B               5      5    3.01

Some pointers to understand the code

  • log(x, 10) replaced with log10(x)
  • to get previous value (i - 1) we use lag here.
  • Looks correct. I need one clarification. Will dplyr ignore the first row by default as NA – marcia akshaya Leo Mar 15 at 4:30
  • @marciaakshayaLeo No..It will not but as we are using lag here, lag gives default first value as NA and any multiplication/division (which we are doing here) done with NA would result into NA hence for first row of every ID it gives output as NA. – Ronak Shah Mar 15 at 4:33
  • Alright. neat. Thank you – marcia akshaya Leo Mar 15 at 4:37

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