19

Is it, and why is it a bad idea to mutate a state from React's new useState hook? I found no info on the topic.

Consider following code:

const [values, setValues] = useState({})

// doSomething can be called once, or multiple times per render

const doSomething = (name, value) => {
  values[name] = value
  setValues({ ...values })
}

Note the mutation of values. Since doSomething can be called more than once per render, doing this would not work because of the async properties of setState:

const doSomething = (name, value) => {
  setValues({ ...values, [name]: value })
}

Is the approach of mutating values directly the correct one in this case?

2 Answers 2

18

You should never mutate state directly as it might not even cause a re-render if you update the state with the same object reference.

const { useState } = React;

function App() {
  const [values, setValues] = useState({});

  const doSomething = (name, value) => {
    values[name] = value;
    setValues(values);
  };

  return (
    <div onClick={() => doSomething(Math.random(), Math.random())}>
      {JSON.stringify(values)}
    </div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="root"></div>

You can give a function as first argument to setValues just like you are used to in the class component setState, and that function in turn will get the correct state as argument, and what is returned will be the new state.

const doSomething = (name, value) => {
  setValues(values => ({ ...values, [name]: value }))
}

const { useState } = React;

function App() {
  const [values, setValues] = useState({});

  const doSomething = (name, value) => {
    setValues(values => ({ ...values, [name]: value }));
  };

  return (
    <div onClick={() => doSomething(Math.random(), Math.random())}>
      {JSON.stringify(values)}
    </div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="root"></div>

2
  • 5
    Yes but is it inherently wrong? The first example you wrote is not what the OP asked. And while I agree that the second example is best practice, it still does not answer the question.
    – Erez Cohen
    Sep 3, 2021 at 13:11
  • @erez Yes, mutating state is wrong. Mutating an object will not change the object reference. When React sees that the object reference didn't change, it will not trigger an update. Weird bugs might appear for mutating states and it will be difficult to find. Btw, the OP is using spread operator so React will get a new object each time so it's the same as NOT MUTATING state. Sep 19, 2021 at 13:00
2

Basically I would avoid mutating state in such way simply for the sake of purity.

However, I would argue that in this case it is perfectly fine. When you mutate a value in an inner level in the state it goes unnoticed by React. Only when calling setValues() with a new reference React notes to itself that a new render is pending.

const { useState } = React;

function App() {
  const [values, setValues] = useState({ num: 0 });

  const handleClick = () => {
    doSomething();
    doSomething();
  }
  
  const doSomething = () =>
    setValues((values) => {
      values.num += 1;
      return { ...values };
    });

return (
  <div onClick={handleClick}>
    {JSON.stringify(values)}
  </div>
);
}

ReactDOM.render( < App / > , document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="root"></div>

(If anyone can provide a counter example I would love to see it).

1
  • yes but even in the most rudimentary examples such as this: setCounter(count=>count+1) Mar 6, 2022 at 2:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.