1

I'm using CountVectorizer to get the list of words in a list of strings

from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import CountVectorizer
raw_text = [
    'The dog hates the black cat',
    'The black dog is good'
]
raw_text = [x.lower() for x in raw_text]
vocabulary = vectorizer.vocabulary_ 
vocabulary = dict((v, k) for k, v in vocabulary.iteritems())
vocabulary

In vocabulary I have then the following data, which are correct

{0: u'black', 1: u'cat', 2: u'dog', 3: u'good', 4: u'hates', 5: u'is', 6: u'the'}

What I would like to obtain now is the original sentences "mapped" to those new values, something like:

expected_output = [
    [6, 2, 4, 6, 0, 1],
    [6, 0, 2, 5, 3]
]

I tried exploring the Sklearn documentation but I can not really find anything that seems to do that and I don't even know the right terminology for the operation I'm trying to perform so I can not find any results in Google.

Is there any way to achieve this result?

3

Lookup each word like this:

from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import CountVectorizer
raw_text = [
    'The dog hates the black cat',
    'The black dog is good'
]

cv = CountVectorizer()
cv.fit_transform(raw_text)


vocab = cv.vocabulary_.copy()

def lookup_key(string):
    s = string.lower()
    return [vocab[w] for w in s.split()]

list(map(lookup_key, raw_text))

Out:

[[6, 2, 4, 6, 0, 1], [6, 0, 2, 5, 3]]
  • Compared to the solution in another answer here, this solution should typically have much better run time for large volumes of text. – Inon Peled Mar 15 at 12:58
  • .split() does not consider the stop words or other prepossessing, which countVectorizer might be done when building the vocabulary – AI_Learning Mar 15 at 13:55
  • @AI_Learning good point. Perhaps using a -1 for any stop words that were removed would be sufficient for OP's use case. – Brendan Martin Mar 15 at 14:05
2

Can you try the following:

mydict = {0: u'black', 1: u'cat', 2: u'dog',
          3: u'good', 4: u'hates', 5: u'is', 6: u'the'}


def get_val_key(val):
    return list(mydict.keys())[list(mydict.values()).index(val.lower())]


raw_text = [
    'The dog hates the black cat',
    'The black dog is good'
]
expected_output = [list(map(get_val_key, text.split())) for text in raw_text]
print(expected_output)

Output:

[[6, 2, 4, 6, 0, 1], [6, 0, 2, 5, 3]]
  • Glad it helped. Happy Coding!!! – Jeril Mar 15 at 12:58
  • Works, but has quadratic time complexity because of the use of list of values. Another answer here provides much better typical run time, by reversing the dict. – Inon Peled Mar 15 at 13:00
1

I think you can just fit the text to build the vocabulary and then use the vocabulary to create the required mapping using build_analyzer()

from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import CountVectorizer
raw_text = [
    'The dog hates the black cat',
    'The black dog is good'
]
vectorizer = CountVectorizer()
vectorizer.fit(raw_text)

analyzer = vectorizer.build_analyzer()
[[vectorizer.vocabulary_[i]  for i in analyzer(doc)]  for doc in raw_text]

Output:

[[6, 2, 4, 6, 0, 1], [6, 0, 2, 5, 3]]

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