1

These two examples of encapsulated pipelines get their pipelineParams from two different methods, however it is not readily clear why one is preferable to the other.

What is the ramification of using

def call(body) {
    // evaluate the body block, and collect configuration into the object
    def pipelineParams= [:]
    body.resolveStrategy = Closure.DELEGATE_FIRST
    body.delegate = pipelineParams
    body()

    pipeline {
        echo pipelineParams.name
    }
}

vs using

def call(Map pipelineParams) {
    pipeline {
        echo pipelineParams.name
    }
}

Example code from https://jenkins.io/blog/2017/10/02/pipeline-templates-with-shared-libraries/

1

The difference is that in the first case, using a pipeline looks like declarative configuration. It's a so-called builder strategy in terms of DSL:

myDeliveryPipeline {
    branch = 'master'
    scmUrl = 'ssh://git@myScmServer.com/repos/myRepo.git'
    ...
}

Whereas in the second case, applying a pipeline looks like imperative code, i.e. it's a regular function call:

myDeliveryPipeline(branch: 'master', scmUrl: 'ssh://git@myScmServer.com/repos/myRepo.git', ...)

There is also explanation in the official Jenkins doc:

There is also a “builder pattern” trick using Groovy’s Closure.DELEGATE_FIRST, which permits Jenkinsfile to look slightly more like a configuration file than a program, but this is more complex and error-prone and is not recommended.

Personally, I can't say that I'm not recommending the DSL approach. The doc doesn't recommend this because it's a bit more complex and can be error-prone

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