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I am trying to create a lock-free Multi-Producer and Multi-Consumer Queue, however it keeps crashing sometimes when trying to pop out the dummy node. When I was first writing this queue algorithm, I realized that there will always be one node stuck in the queue at the very end of the program, to solve this, I simply had the consumer pop in a dummy node. I have verified that the queue works if we omit the inserting/removing the dummy node

The push simply tries to add the node into tail->next and then swing the mTail node pointer forward. If another thread beat us by writing to tail->next then try to swing it forward (to prevent threads that have been rescheduled here from blocking other producer threads).

    /// @todo Update memory barriers for even faster performance
    /// Pushes a node into the queue.
    /// @param next The node to insert into the node
    /// @return bool Whether the node was successfully inserted into the queue
    // The impl goes like this. One invariant is that there is ALWAYS one node in
    // the queue. This allows us to push an element into it without having to worry
    // the consumers and producers fighting for the head node. If the tail node's
    // next pointer is null then we have the ability to insert a node. So we will
    // CAS on that node. This node will never "disapear" because one of the invariants
    // is that there is at least one node in the queue. Once the next node is published
    // consumers can pop the current tail node, but we dont care if this is popped. It
    // will just mean that the tail node points to a node before the head node. Which
    // will be corrected either by us or the next producer thread. If the next pointer
    // is taken by another thread then just move the mTail node forward (unnessary, but)
    // if the thread that added the next node dies then we will never be able to add more
    // nodes anymore.
    bool sync_push(node_ptr_t next) {
        node_ptr_t tail = mTail.load();
        node_ptr_t tailNext = nullptr;
        // we cant have spurious failures here or the mTail node will be set to nullptr
        if (tail->next.compare_exchange_strong(tailNext, next)) {
            mTail.compare_exchange_weak(tail, next);
            return true;
        }
        mTail.compare_exchange_weak(tail, tailNext);
        return false;
    }

The pop algorithm pushes the dummy node into the queue if the queue has one node in the queue and if the dummy node is not already in the queue (checks using a flag). It tries to pop a node and if it is successful and it is not the dummy node then returns the node. If it is the dummy node, it clears the flag and returns nullptr

/// Trys to push a dummy node into the queue. Will not always success and does not block
/// @param func Whether to use unsync_push or sync_push to push the dummy node
/// @note Is thread-safe is sync_push is used. Is non-blocking
void push_dummy() {
    if (!mDummy.in.test_and_set()) {
        mDummy.ptr->next = nullptr;
        if(!sync_push(mDummy.ptr))
            mDummy.in.clear();
    }
}

// if we get the dummy then we want to clear the status variable and return nullptr
// because we couldn't pop out a valid node.
node_ptr_t pop_dummy(node_ptr_t node) {
    if (node == mDummy.ptr) {
        node->next = nullptr;
        mDummy.in.clear();
        return nullptr;
    }
    return node;
}


/// Pops a node from the queue.
/// @return The popped node if successful, or nullptr if we failed
// This part is more complicated because we need to be use a seperate algo if there
// is only one node in the queue, to prevent broken invariants. We first test if there
// is only one node in the queue. If so, we have ONE thread push in the dummy node. This
// will allow us to pop the last node out of the queue. We use a std::atomic_flag to signal
// to other threads that we are going to be the one to push the dummy node. There is an issue
// here where the push can fail. For now Im putting it into a loop, but this can be blocking.
// I will fix this later. Once we push the dummy node, we failed in popping a node so we return
// and let another thread pop the non-dummy node. If there is more than one node in the
// queue, then we just move the head forward. If we popped the dummy node then we clear the
// flag and return that we failed. If we have a valid node then we return the popped
// node, if we cant move the head forward then just return we failed.
// There is a few optimizations we can do here, for example, after we insert the dummy node, might
// as well try to pop that single node. But let me commit this so I dont lose it.
node_ptr_t sync_pop() {
    node_ptr_t head = mHead.load();
    node_ptr_t headNext = head->next.load();
    if (headNext == nullptr) { // we have one node then push a dummy node so we can pull out the last node
        push_dummy();
        return nullptr;
    } else {
        if (mHead.compare_exchange_weak(head, headNext)) {
            return pop_dummy(head);
        }
        return nullptr;
    }
}

While trying to debug this, I have had the program freeze and after debugging it seems that the dummy node is not in the queue but the flag variable hasn't been reset. I have also seen the dummy node being inserted twice.

Full code is here:

/// An wait-free MTMC queue.
///     - T must be default construtable
///     - If T does not have a nothrow move/copy constructable/assignable
///       semantics, then smart_ptr semantics must be used
///     - All smart_ptr objects must be destroyed BEFORE the queue is destroyed

#include <atomic>
#include <memory>
#include <utility>
#include <new>

namespace ari {

/// Internal impl of a lockfree queue node.
template <typename T>
struct lfq_node {
    using node_ptr_t = lfq_node*; //< Node pointer to next element
    using value_type = T; //< Data type


    /// Default constructor
    lfq_node() = default;


    /// Inplace constructs an node with given parameters
    /// @param n The next pointer
    /// @param args The arguments to construct the data with
    template <typename... Args>
    lfq_node(node_ptr_t n, Args&&... args) : next{ n }, data{ std::forward<Args>(args)... } {  }


    /// Default constructs the data with the next pointer
    /// @param n The next pointer
    lfq_node(node_ptr_t n) : next{ n }, data{  } {  }


    std::atomic<node_ptr_t> next; //< Pointer to the next node
    value_type data; //< The internal data
};


/// An allocator aware lock-free impl of a thread-safe queue.
template <typename T, typename A = std::allocator<T>>
class lockfree_queue {
    using node_t = lfq_node<T>; //< Node type
    using node_ptr_t = lfq_node<T>*; //< Node pointer type
    using node_allocator_type = typename std::allocator_traits<A>::template rebind_alloc<node_t>; //< Node allocator type
    using node_allocator_traits_type = std::allocator_traits<node_allocator_type>; //< Node allocator helper class

    #ifdef __cpp_lib_thread_hardware_interference_size
    static constexpr size_t cache_line = std::hardware_destructive_interference_size;
    #else
    static constexpr size_t cache_line = 64;
    #endif


    alignas(cache_line) struct {
        const node_ptr_t ptr; //< The dummy node
        std::atomic_flag in; //< Flag to notify if queue has dummy node
    } mDummy;
    alignas(cache_line) std::atomic<node_ptr_t> mHead; //< Head node of the queue
    alignas(cache_line) std::atomic<node_ptr_t> mTail; //< Tail node of the queue
    alignas(cache_line) node_allocator_type mAlloc; //< Allocator for node


    // Constructs a new node with the next pointer pointing to null
    // @param args The arguments from which to construct the node from
    // @return The new node
    template <typename... Args>
    node_ptr_t new_node(Args&&... args) {
        auto ptr = node_allocator_traits_type::allocate(mAlloc, 1);
        node_allocator_traits_type::construct(mAlloc, ptr, nullptr, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
        return ptr;
    }


    // Constructs a new node with the next pointer pointing to null. The data is default init
    // @return The new node
    node_ptr_t new_node() {
        auto ptr = node_allocator_traits_type::allocate(mAlloc, 1);
        node_allocator_traits_type::construct(mAlloc, ptr, nullptr);
        return ptr;
    }


    // Deletes a node and the internal data
    // @param ptr The node to delete/deallocate
    void delete_node(node_ptr_t ptr) {
        node_allocator_traits_type::destroy(mAlloc, ptr);
        node_allocator_traits_type::deallocate(mAlloc, ptr, 1);
    }


    /// @todo Update memory barriers for even faster performance
    /// Pushes a node into the queue.
    /// @param next The node to insert into the node
    /// @return bool Whether the node was successfully inserted into the queue
    // The impl goes like this. One invariant is that there is ALWAYS one node in
    // the queue. This allows us to push an element into it without having to worry
    // the consumers and producers fighting for the head node. If the tail node's
    // next pointer is null then we have the ability to insert a node. So we will
    // CAS on that node. This node will never "disapear" because one of the invariants
    // is that there is at least one node in the queue. Once the next node is published
    // consumers can pop the current tail node, but we dont care if this is popped. It
    // will just mean that the tail node points to a node before the head node. Which
    // will be corrected either by us or the next producer thread. If the next pointer
    // is taken by another thread then just move the mTail node forward (unnessary, but)
    // if the thread that added the next node dies then we will never be able to add more
    // nodes anymore.
    bool sync_push(node_ptr_t next) {
        node_ptr_t tail = mTail.load();
        node_ptr_t tailNext = nullptr;
        // we cant have spurious failures here or the mTail node will be set to nullptr
        if (tail->next.compare_exchange_strong(tailNext, next)) {
            mTail.compare_exchange_weak(tail, next);
            return true;
        }
        mTail.compare_exchange_weak(tail, tailNext);
        return false;
    }


    /// Trys to push a dummy node into the queue. Will not always success and does not block
    /// @param func Whether to use unsync_push or sync_push to push the dummy node
    /// @note Is thread-safe is sync_push is used. Is non-blocking
    void push_dummy() {
        if (!mDummy.in.test_and_set()) {
            mDummy.ptr->next = nullptr;
            if(!sync_push(mDummy.ptr))
                mDummy.in.clear();
        }
    }

    // if we get the dummy then we want to clear the status variable and return nullptr
    // because we couldn't pop out a valid node.
    node_ptr_t pop_dummy(node_ptr_t node) {
        if (node == mDummy.ptr) {
            node->next = nullptr;
            mDummy.in.clear();
            return nullptr;
        }
        return node;
    }


    /// Pops a node from the queue.
    /// @return The popped node if successful, or nullptr if we failed
    // This part is more complicated because we need to be use a seperate algo if there
    // is only one node in the queue, to prevent broken invariants. We first test if there
    // is only one node in the queue. If so, we have ONE thread push in the dummy node. This
    // will allow us to pop the last node out of the queue. We use a std::atomic_flag to signal
    // to other threads that we are going to be the one to push the dummy node. There is an issue
    // here where the push can fail. For now Im putting it into a loop, but this can be blocking.
    // I will fix this later. Once we push the dummy node, we failed in popping a node so we return
    // and let another thread pop the non-dummy node. If there is more than one node in the
    // queue, then we just move the head forward. If we popped the dummy node then we clear the
    // flag and return that we failed. If we have a valid node then we return the popped
    // node, if we cant move the head forward then just return we failed.
    // There is a few optimizations we can do here, for example, after we insert the dummy node, might
    // as well try to pop that single node. But let me commit this so I dont lose it.
    node_ptr_t sync_pop() {
        node_ptr_t head = mHead.load();
        node_ptr_t headNext = head->next.load();
        if (headNext == nullptr) { // we have one node then push a dummy node so we can pull out the last node
            push_dummy();
            return nullptr;
        } else {
            if (mHead.compare_exchange_weak(head, headNext)) {
                return pop_dummy(head);
            }
            return nullptr;
        }
    }

public:
    // see https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/queue
    using value_type = T;
    using reference = T&;
    using const_reference = const T&;
    using allocator_type = A;
    using size_type = std::size_t;
    using difference_type = std::ptrdiff_t;

    /// Constructs queue with no elements
    lockfree_queue()
        : mDummy{ new_node(), ATOMIC_FLAG_INIT }
        , mHead{ mDummy.ptr }
        , mTail{ mDummy.ptr }
        , mAlloc{ }
    { while(mDummy.in.test_and_set()); }


    /// Destroys the queue, pops all the elements out of the queue. Would be a smart idea to
    /// set mHead and mTail to prevent other threads from accessing the data
    ~lockfree_queue() {
        while (mHead.load(std::memory_order_relaxed) != mDummy.ptr) {
            node_ptr_t node = sync_pop();
            if (node != nullptr) delete_node(node);
        }
        delete_node(mDummy.ptr);
    }


    /// Pushed \p element into the queue
    /// @param element The element to push into the queue
    void push(const_reference element) {
        node_ptr_t next = new_node(element);
        while (!sync_push(next));
    }

    /// Pops an element off the list and returns it
    /// @return The popped element
    /// @note thread-safe and blocking
    template <typename U = value_type>
    U pop() {
        node_ptr_t node = nullptr;
        while ((node = sync_pop()) == nullptr);
        U data = node->data;
        delete_node(node);
        return data;
    }


    /// Attempts to push an element in the queue in a single pass.
    /// @param element The element to push into the queue
    /// @note this is thread-safe and non-blocking
    bool try_push(const_reference element) {
        node_ptr_t next = new_node(element);
        bool success = sync_push(next);
        if (!success) delete_node(next);
        return success;
    }

    /// Attempts to pop an element in a single pass
    /// @note this is non-blocking
    /// @return If an element was successfully popped
    /// @return The popped element or a default constructed element
    template <typename U = value_type>
    std::pair<bool, U> try_pop() {
        node_ptr_t node = sync_pop();

        if (node == nullptr) {
            return { false, U{ } };
        } else {
            U data = node->data;
            delete_node(node);
            return { true, data };
        }
    }
};

} // end namespace ari
  • It might make more sense to have push_dummy use a mHead.CAS_strong(nullptr, dummy) as a way to make sure only one thread succeeds at pushing the dummy. (Optimize for the no-contention case because that's rare, that's maybe cheaper than a separate flag. Especially because that doesn't involve allocating a new dummy.) Maybe there's something I missed in why you need this extra flag in a dummy. – Peter Cordes Mar 18 at 1:04
  • In sync_pop, how do you make sure node_ptr_t headNext = head->next.load(); can't fault? If the reader sleeps for a long time between head = mHead.load(); and dereferencing it, the node it has a pointer to could have been popped and deleted by some other reader, right? The deallocation problem is why MPMC queues normally use a fixed-size circular buffer instead of linked lists, especially in languages that aren't garbage-collected. – Peter Cordes Mar 18 at 1:08
  • Crash how? Run it under a debugger to see which line of code crashes, doing what. (And BTW, test special cases by having 1 thread stopped at a breakpoint in the middle of a sync_pop, while you let other threads run for a while. Then continue the sync_pop to see what happens when you sleep for a long time at any given point.) – Peter Cordes Mar 18 at 1:10

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