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How can i write a program that computes f[n] (for Fibonacci numbers:f[n]=f[n]-f[n-2], with f[0] = any number) using Module and a While loop?

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3 Answers 3

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Homework? I hope you learn by example. ;-)

Your subject line says recursion, but you don't specify that in your question; rather, you specify Module and While. I'll go with the latter.

fib[n_] := 
  Module[{x = 1, y = 0, i = 0},
    While[i++ < n, {x, y} = {y, x + y}];
    y
  ]

Array[fib, 7]

(*  Out[]= {1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13}  *)

Table[fib[m], {m, 1,10}] 

(*  Out[]= {1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55}  *)
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  • haha nah the homework sequence question is harder then a fibonacci sequence?
    – Sunday
    Commented Apr 2, 2011 at 7:14
  • What if we had to input table[fib[m],{1,10}] ?
    – Sunday
    Commented Apr 2, 2011 at 7:17
  • @Sunday really just joking about the homework thing, but your question does seem strangely specific. Why not something like: "what are some good ways to generate the Fibonacci sequence in Mathematica, without using Fibonacci[x]?" ? Anyway, I just updated my answer with a cleaner version.
    – Mr.Wizard
    Commented Apr 2, 2011 at 7:17
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    @Sunday You're welcome. If you find an answer helpful, please give it an up vote (the triangle above the number to the left). If an answer is fully satisfactory, please also "accept" it by clicking the check mark. You can and should up vote all answers that are helpful, but you may only "accept" one answer. However, you may change which answer you accept at any time.
    – Mr.Wizard
    Commented Apr 2, 2011 at 7:49
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    @David Array is more direct, since you are giving arguments directly, rather than by named iterators. This makes it clearer for multi-dimentional specifications, like Array[x, {2, 4, 3}], but less flexible. For example, with Table iterators can be interdependent (Table[j, {i, 7}, {j, i}]), and have skips (Table[i, {i, 2, 12, 2}]) while Array cannot. You can specify a starting index or "origin" however.
    – Mr.Wizard
    Commented Apr 2, 2011 at 18:46
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If you're trying to impress your instructor, I would use the memory cache approach. It is significantly faster than the approach Sjoerd is describing.

Consider this implementation

fib[0]:=1
fib[1]:=1
fib[n_]:= (fib[n]=fib[n-1]+fib[n-2])

Lets compare the two, just to prove my point.

slowfib[0]:=1
slowfib[1]:=1
slowfib[n_]:=slowfib[n-1]+slowfib[n-2]

Here's the comparison in runtimes:

Map[fib, Range[30]] // AbsoluteTiming

{0.000158, {1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 
  987, 1597, 2584, 4181, 6765, 10946, 17711, 28657, 46368, 75025, 
  121393, 196418, 317811, 514229, 832040, 1346269}}

Map[slowfib, Range[30]] // AbsoluteTiming

{6.582185, {1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 
987, 1597, 2584, 4181, 6765, 10946, 17711, 28657, 46368, 75025, 
121393, 196418, 317811, 514229, 832040, 1346269}}

The runtime is so much higher because the recursive function

fib[n_]:=fib[n-1]+fib[n-2]

generates n^2 recursive calls (write it out on paper if that doesn't make sense). On the other hand, defining

fib[n_]:= fib[n]=fib[n-1]+fib[n-2]

takes advantage of memory caching to calculate the terms, which results in a drastically faster runtime, since each call generates a cached value for fib[x].

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  • Welcome to StackOverflow. Memoization is indeed advantageous, but this does not use Module or While as the OP requested.
    – Mr.Wizard
    Commented Apr 3, 2011 at 21:29
  • @keshav Of course, the mma documentation makes this abundantly clear. I didn't want to complicate matters by adding this. Commented Apr 3, 2011 at 22:56
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    @Mr.Wizard The OP asks for recursion in the title, which is clearly contradictory with the other requirements of While&Module. So you have to choose for either of them. Commented Apr 3, 2011 at 22:59
  • @Sjoerd, that is true, but, if you will pardon me, Sunday selected my answer, so I presume I guessed right.
    – Mr.Wizard
    Commented Apr 3, 2011 at 23:08
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    @Keshav Saharia In really the recursive function generates Exp[n/2] recursive calls: slowfib[0] = 1; slowfib[1] = 1; slowfib[n_] := (++i; slowfib[n - 1] + slowfib[n - 2]); g = ListLinePlot[tb = Table[i = 0; slowfib[n]; {n, i}, {n, 2, 25}]]; fun = FindFit[tb, a Exp[k n], {a, k}, n]; Show[g, Plot[a Exp[k t] /. fun, {t, 2, 25}, PlotStyle -> Black]]. Commented Apr 4, 2011 at 1:16
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Going by the first part of your title, the following approach would be an example of how to do that:

fib[1] = 1; 
fib[2] = 1; 
fib[n_] := fib[n - 1] + fib[n - 2]

fib[3]
fib[7]

Out[11]= 2

Out[12]= 13

fib /@ Range[20]

Out[10]= {1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 
610, 987, 1597, 2584, 4181,  6765}

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