19

Here is my program,

item_no = []
max_no = 0
for i in range(5):
    input_no = int(input("Enter an item number: "))
    item_no.append(input_no)
for no in item_no:
    if no > max_no:
       max_no = no
high = item_no.index(max_no)
print (item_no[high])

Example input: [5, 6, 7, 8, 8]

Example output: 8

How can I change my program to output the same highest numbers in an array?

Expected output: [8, 8]

  • 5
    Band indent at line 8 – DirtyBit Mar 18 '19 at 7:21
  • 1
    You can use Dictionary to store the maximum number and its count as item_no = {}, if you max is different then original in item_no, reinitialize it and add that item and add count =1 – dkb Mar 18 '19 at 7:21
  • 5
    ("Band" probably is a misspelling for "Bad") – tripleee Mar 18 '19 at 7:26
  • 1
    @tripleee Indeed. bulls-eye! – DirtyBit Mar 18 '19 at 7:39
  • 1
    As answers show, it's more Pythonic to do it with list comprehensions, rather than loops. But if you use loops to iterate over the list, a style tip: don't use the same variable name i both for indices i in range(5) then also for items/values: for i in item_no. Better to do for no in item_no – smci Mar 19 '19 at 0:35
29

Just get the maximum using max and then its count and combine the two in a list-comprehension.

item_no = [5, 6, 7, 8, 8]

max_no = max(item_no)
highest = [max_no for _ in range(item_no.count(max_no))]
print(highest)  # -> [8, 8]

Note that this will return a list of a single item in case your maximum value appears only once.


A solution closer to your current programming style would be the following:

item_no = [5, 6, 7, 8, 8]
max_no = 0  # Note 1 
for i in item_no:
    if i > max_no:
        max_no = i
        high = [i]
    elif i == max_no:
        high.append(i)

with the same results as above of course.

Notes

  1. I am assuming that you are dealing with N* (1, 2, ...) numbers only. If that is not the case, initializing with -math.inf should be used instead.

Note that the second code snippet is less efficient than the first by quite a margin. Python allows you to be more efficient than these explicit, fortran-like loops and it is more efficient itself when you use it properly.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    @user11206537 I kinda saw this coming. Knowing what a better way would be is still of some value. Have fun! – Ma0 Mar 18 '19 at 7:44
  • 1
    You might want to start with a smaller number than 0. – Eric Duminil Mar 18 '19 at 8:48
  • 3
    @user11206537 To get the index as well, you can modify the code slightly and use enumerate on item_no. As you loop through, store the index in a 2nd list as you do for the max. Take a look at this – Ma0 Mar 18 '19 at 9:32
  • 1
    @EricDuminil importing math.inf and using that seems like an overkill for this. I will leave that to the OP. He might have to deal with natural number lists only. For the ones seeking a better solution, they can use the first snippet which does not have such shortcomings. – Ma0 Mar 18 '19 at 9:35
  • 1
    I'm not too familiar with python--does high in the second solution need to be defined before the loop if you want to print the result after? – Drew Mar 18 '19 at 22:59
20

You can do it even shorter:

item_no = [5, 6, 7, 8, 8]
#compute once - use many times
max_item = max(item_no)
print(item_no.count(max_item) * [max_item])

Output:

[8, 8]
| improve this answer | |
7

You could use list comprehension for that task following way:

numbers = [5, 6, 7, 8, 8]
maxnumbers = [i for i in numbers if i==max(numbers)]
print(*maxnumbers,sep=',')

output:

8,8

* operator in print is used to unpack values, sep is used to inform print what seperator to use: , in this case.

EDIT: If you want to get indices of biggest value and call max only once then do:

numbers = [5, 6, 7, 8, 8]
biggest = max(numbers)
positions = [inx for inx,i in enumerate(numbers) if i==biggest]
print(*positions,sep=',')

Output:

3,4

As you might check numbers[3] is equal to biggest and numbers[4] is equal to biggest.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    note that your solution calls max a total of len(numbers) times. Storing it outside the list and then using that would be better. – Ma0 Mar 18 '19 at 7:31
  • 1
    @Ev.Kounis I assume the Python interpreter optimizes this, no? – user1717828 Mar 18 '19 at 16:38
  • 1
    @user1717828 No it does not. – Ma0 Mar 19 '19 at 7:04
  • 1
    @Ev.Kounis, Oh man, I didn't believe this so I tested it out. python -m timeit "numbers = [5, 6, 7, 8, 8]; max_number = max(numbers); maxnumbers = [i for i in numbers if i==max_number]" is twice as fast as when the max calculation is in the comprehension. I've gotten very spoiled from using languages with compilers. – user1717828 Mar 19 '19 at 9:53
  • 1
    @user1717828 And you should expect this difference to skyrocket with larger lists. Try it with numbers = [random.randint(0, 500) for _ in range(10000)]. – Ma0 Mar 19 '19 at 10:47
4
  1. Count the occurrence of max number

  2. iterate over the list to print the max number for the range of the count (1)

Hence:

item_no = [5, 6, 7, 8, 8]
counter = item_no.count(max(item_no))      # 2
print([max(item_no) for x in range(counter)])   

OUTPUT:

[8, 8]
| improve this answer | |
  • How do you find the index of the result in item_no? – Justin Mar 18 '19 at 8:56
3

This issue can be solved in one line, by finding an item which is equal to the maximum value: To improve performance store max in var Mvalue=max(item_no) [i for i in item_no if i==Mvalue]

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    How do you find the index of the result in item_no? – Justin Mar 18 '19 at 9:01
  • 1
    By using enumerate function, we can get index position: [i for i, val in enumerate(item_no) if val in result] – Pradeep Pandey Mar 18 '19 at 11:56
  • 1
    But isn't max called n times? Not efficient. – Sachin Dangol Mar 20 '19 at 1:10
2

I think it would be better if we evaluate the max in the array and its count in one iteration

def maxs(iterable):
    max = None
    count = 0
    for index, value in enumerate(iterable):
        if index == 0 or value >= max:
            if value != max:
                count = 0
            max = value
            count += 1
    return count * [max]


print (maxs([5, 6, 7, 8, 8]))   # [8, 8]
print (maxs([3, 2, 4, 5, 1, 2, 4, 5, 2, 5, 0])) # [5, 5, 5]
print (maxs([])) # []

Give it a Try!!

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @user11206537 Did you measure and compared the efficiency among the solutions. Can you share with us? – Grijesh Chauhan Mar 20 '19 at 11:54
  • 1
    This kind of solution was the one that was actually needed as a part of my school project and my teacher thought of it as a very efficient solution. This code is also written along the lines of my current programming style, which is exactly what I wanted. – Justin Mar 20 '19 at 13:29
  • FYI, this has the second worst performance of the answers I timed. – Peilonrayz May 6 '19 at 20:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.