1

I have the following definition in the file Show.scala:

package com.example

trait Show[A] {
  def show(a: A): String
}

object Show {
  def apply[A](implicit sh: Show[A]): Show[A] = sh

  //def show[A](a:A)(implicit  sh: Show[A]) = sh.show(a)
  def show[A: Show](a: A) = Show[A].show(a)

  implicit class ShowOps[A: Show](a: A) {
    def show = Show[A].show(a)
  }

  implicit val intCanShow: Show[Int] =
    new Show[Int] {
      override def show(a: Int): String = s"int $a"
    }

}

and in the Main.scala:

package com.example

object Main extends App {

  println(Show.show(344))
  println(30.show)
}  

The compiler complains:

[error] /home/developer/scala/show/src/main/scala/com/example/Main.scala:6:14: value show is not a member of Int
[error]   println(30.show)
[error]              ^
[error] one error found  

What am I doing wrong?

7

In order to Main to find Show, you need to import Show._ in Main.scala

package com.example

object Main extends App {
  import Show._ 
  // Or import Show.ShowOps if you only want to use that implicit

  println(Show.show(344))
  println(30.show)
}  

You can Try it

Here are the implicits rules to keep in mind (From Martin's book):

Here is the relevant rule for your particular case (I have highlighted the relevant parts):

Scope Rule: An inserted implicit conversion must be in scope as a single identifier, or be associated with the source or target type of the conversion. The Scala compiler will only consider implicit conversions that are in scope. To make an implicit conversion available, therefore, you must in some way bring it into scope. Moreover, with one exception, the implicit conversion must be in scope as a single identifier. The compiler will not insert a conversion of the form someVariable.convert. For example, it will not expand x + y to someVariable.convert(x) + y. If you want to make someVariable.convert available as an implicit, therefore, you would need to import it, which would make it available as a single identifier. Once imported, the compiler would be free to apply it as convert(x) + y. In fact, it is common for libraries to include a Preamble object including a number of useful implicit conversions. Code that uses the library can then do a single "import Preamble._" to access the library's implicit conversions

  • Why do I need to import? It is in the same package. – zero_coding Mar 18 '19 at 13:38
  • 2
    There are rules for implicits to work, one of them is that you need to explicetely import them – ElBaulP Mar 18 '19 at 13:39
  • 2
    @zero_coding The implicit val is inside Show so it is not directly visible outside that object (just like any other symbol inside an object or class). – Tim Mar 18 '19 at 15:00
4

Try this one..

package com.example

import Show._ // add in order to access implicit..

object Main extends App {

  println(Show.show(344))
  println(30.show)
}  

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.