2

so I'm getting this error:

Global symbol "@Z" requires explicit package name 
(did you forget to declare "my @Z"?) at 
C:/Users/owner/Documents/Slic3r/lib/Slic3r/Print/SupportMaterial.pm line 937. Global symbol "@Z" requires explicit package name (did you forget to declare "my @Z"?) at C:/Users/owner/Documents/Slic3r/lib/Slic3r/Print/SupportMaterial.pm line 945

Code:

my ($X_ref,$Y_ref)=grid($min_X,$max_X,$min_Y,$max_Y,$distance);my @X=@$X_ref;my @Y=@{$Y_ref};
for my $i (0..$#X){
    $Z[$i]=20;#The function that defined the height of each point. This setting wil give you a flat roof. For a more advanced tree, try:
    #$Z[$i]=-0.01*$X[$i]**2+0.2*$Y[$i]-0.005*$Y[$i]**2+20;
}

#End of input parameters.

my $min_radian = deg2rad($min_angle);
my $b = tan($min_radian);
my @Z=map{$_/$b} @Z;

After declaring the code with "my" for each of the respected errors:

"my" variable @Z masks earlier declaration in same statement at C:/Users/owner/Documents/Slic3r/lib/Slic3r/Print/SupportMaterial.pm line 945.
"my" variable @Z masks earlier declaration in same statement at C:/Users/owner/Documents/Slic3r/lib/Slic3r/Print/SupportMaterial.pm line 945.
syntax error at C:/Users/owner/Documents/Slic3r/lib/Slic3r/Print/SupportMaterial.pm line 937, near "$Z["

Code:

my ($X_ref,$Y_ref)=grid($min_X,$max_X,$min_Y,$max_Y,$distance);my @X=@$X_ref;my @Y=@{$Y_ref};
for my $i (0..$#X){
    my $Z[$i]=20;#The function that defined the height of each point. This setting wil give you a flat roof. For a more advanced tree, try:
    #$Z[$i]=-0.01*$X[$i]**2+0.2*$Y[$i]-0.005*$Y[$i]**2+20;
}

#End of input parameters.

my $min_radian = deg2rad($min_angle);
my $b = tan($min_radian);
my @Z=map{$_/$b} my @Z;

Any help would be great guys, really struggling to figure why these two are not working correctly.

  • If @Z is already declared elsewhere, then why are you using my? On the other hand, if it's not already declared elsewhere, then why are you trying to pass an undefined variable to map? This is the equivalent of int x = x; in C. – Mike Holt Mar 18 at 20:28
  • You need to declare variables using my in the scope you want them to exist in visually. This tutorial may be helpful. Your syntax error comes from my $Z[$i] which is an invalid declaration (and you want it declared outside that scope anyway). – Grinnz Mar 18 at 23:36
  • 1
    @MikeHolt no, it isn't. while my returns the new variable and allows you to do things like assign to it, otherwise the scope of a lexical in perl only begins on the following statement. so my @Z = 1..3; my @Z = map 4-$_, @Z; print @Z prints 432; the second @Z in the second statement is the first one declared, not the second. – ysth Mar 19 at 1:25
  • @ysth I was talking about the case when there is no previously defined @Z, and the point was just that he was referencing a non-existent variable. I hadn't yet seen the my @Z declared inside the loop, but even in that case, the @Z inside the for loop dies once it goes out of scope. If you have use strict on, and you attempted to reference @Z after the loop, it would complain about @Z being undeclared. And without use strict, if you did my @Z { whatever } @Z after the loop, you'd just get an auto-vivified @Z, not the same @Z from inside the loop. – Mike Holt Mar 19 at 16:08
3

You're declaring @Z (using the keyword my) in two different scopes. One inside the for loop, and one afterwards. If you need @Z to still exist after the for loop completes, you need to declare it outside of (and prior to) that scope.

Also, only use my once:

my @Z;
my ($X_ref,$Y_ref)=grid($min_X,$max_X,$min_Y,$max_Y,$distance);my @X=@$X_ref;my @Y=@{$Y_ref};
for my $i (0..$#X){
    $Z[$i]=20;#The function that defined the height of each point. This setting      wil give you a flat roof. For a more advanced tree, try:
    #$Z[$i]=-0.01*$X[$i]**2+0.2*$Y[$i]-0.005*$Y[$i]**2+20;
}

#End of input parameters.

my $min_radian = deg2rad($min_angle);
my $b = tan($min_radian);
@Z=map{$_/$b} @Z;
-2

When you set my, so you have to define the base.

old school: my @Z =(); new school: my $Z ="";

This should be the missed one.

  • 1
    Sorry but this answer makes no sense. – Grinnz Mar 19 at 16:49

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