0

I am learning how to reverse strings (i.e., write backwards) from first principles in C++. I devised the following code that is meant to take in a string from the user, reverse it, and print it out. However, it fails to compile—Visual Studio gives me an error "string subset out of range". What is wrong?

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string example;

    getline(cin, example);

    int i = 0;

    while (example[i] != '\0') 
    {
        i++;
    }

    int n=0;
    string reverse;

    while (n < i)
    {
        reverse[n] = example[i - n - 1];
        n++;
    }

    cout << reverse << endl;

    return 0;
}

I am targeting C++17.

  • 1
    It sounds like you may need to learn how to use a debugger to step through your code. With a good debugger, you can execute your program line by line and see where it is deviating from what you expect. This is an essential tool if you are going to do any programming. Further reading: How to debug small programs and Debugging Guide – NathanOliver Mar 19 at 16:47
  • 1
    I hardly doubt VS would validate string index at compile time, please be accurate with discpription - do you get compile or runtime rror? – Slava Mar 19 at 16:48
  • I don't think that applies to my case since the names of my two strings are different. You are probably thinking of the instance when the reversed string is given the same name as the original one, right? @Bathsheba – Alex Mar 19 at 16:48
  • I get a runtime error @Slava – Alex Mar 19 at 16:50
  • 1
    You do not resize reverse to the size of of example so any n would be out of range. Why don’t you use push_back? – t.niese Mar 19 at 16:50
2

reverse[n] causes the string out of index problem. You just created the string and its size is zero. Here's how you fix it:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using std::string;
using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::getline;

int main()
{
    string example;
    getline(cin, example);
    int i = 0;
    while (example[i] != '\0') 
    {
        i++;
    }

    int n=0;
    string reverse(example.size(), 0);

    while (n < i)
    {
        reverse[n] = example[i - n - 1];
        n++;
    }

    cout << reverse << endl;

    return 0;
}

However, there's still a lot wrong about this code. For instance, storing the size of the string in int is a bad idea. Use std::string::size_type instead. And std::string::size already gives you the size, no need to count it. Also, consider using a for loop here:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using std::string;
using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::getline;

int main()
{
    string example;
    getline(cin, example);
    string reverse(example.size(), 0);
    for (string::size_type n = 0; n != example.size(); ++n)
    {
        reverse[n] = example[example.size() - n - 1];
    }

    cout << reverse << endl;

    return 0;
}

Having said that, here's how I'd implement it:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using std::string;
using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::getline;

int main()
{
  auto example = string();
  getline(cin, example);
  auto reverse = string(example.crbegin(), example.crend());

  cout << reverse << endl;

  return 0;
}

Make sure to familiarize yourself with reverse iterators if you are not already.

  • Thanks. Why is it a bad idea to store the length of a string as an integer? @Ayxan – Alex Mar 19 at 17:00
  • int has a max value limit. You can check your implementations limit by using INT_MAX. If the string is larger than that maximum, integer overflows. std::size_t on the other hand is guaranteed to be large enough to represented the size of the string. No matter how big it is – Ayxan Mar 19 at 17:05
  • size_t also has a max value limit. The important part is that the the max value of int could be different from size_t (int could in theory also be larger) and that size_t is unsigned and int is signed. You should user numeric_limits instead of INT_MAX. And while it is true that std::string::size_type is size_t one most of the implementations it is - afaik - not guaranteed to be size_t. So the appropriate type for n is strictly speaking std::string::size_type. – t.niese Mar 20 at 6:33
  • size_t also has a max value limit. The important part is that the max value of int could be different from size_t (the max of int could in theory also be larger then the one of size_t) and that size_t is unsigned and int is signed. You should use numeric_limits instead of INT_MAX. And while it is true that std::string::size_type is size_t one most of the implementations it is - afaik - not guaranteed to be size_t. So the appropriate type for n is strictly speaking std::string::size_type. – t.niese Mar 20 at 6:45
  • size_t does have a max value, but it is guaranteed to be large enough to represent the size of the string. And since A type whose size cannot be represented by std::size_t is ill-formed, it is always fine to use std::size_t instead of std::string::size_type or any other size_type, no? – Ayxan Mar 20 at 7:50
0

Your problem : reverse[n] = example[i - n - 1];

As you have used string as data type, but are using character array syntax;

change it to :

`reverse += example[i - n - 1];

Complete code for reference :`

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

    string example;

    getline(cin, example);

    int i = 0;

    while (example[i] != '\0') 
    {
        i++;
    }

    int n=0;
    string reverse;

    //cout << i << endl;

    while (n < i)
    {
        reverse += example[i - n - 1];
        n++;
    }

    cout << reverse << endl;

    return 0;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.