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Python 3.7 introduced dataclasses to store data. I'm considering to move to this new approach which is more organized and well structured than a dict.

But I have a doubt. Python transforms keys into hashes on dicts and that makes looking for keys and values much faster. Dataclasses implement something like it?

Which one is faster and why?

2 Answers 2

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All classes in python actually use a dictionary under the hood to store their attributes, as you can read here in the documentation. For a more in-depth reference on how python classes (and many more things) work, you can also check out the article on python's datamodel, in particular the section on custom classes.

So in general, there shouldn't be a loss in performance by moving from dictionaries to dataclasses. But it's better to make sure with the timeit module:


Baseline

# dictionary creation
$ python -m timeit "{'var': 1}"
5000000 loops, best of 5: 52.9 nsec per loop

# dictionary key access
$ python -m timeit -s "d = {'var': 1}" "d['var']"
10000000 loops, best of 5: 20.3 nsec per loop

Basic dataclass

# dataclass creation
$ python -m timeit -s "from dataclasses import dataclass" -s "@dataclass" -s "class A: var: int" "A(1)" 
1000000 loops, best of 5: 288 nsec per loop

# dataclass attribute access
$ python -m timeit -s "from dataclasses import dataclass" -s "@dataclass" -s "class A: var: int" -s "a = A(1)" "a.var" 
10000000 loops, best of 5: 25.3 nsec per loop

Here we can see that using classes does have some overhead. For class creation it's quite a bit (~5 times slower), but you don't necessarily need to care that much about it as long as you don't plan to create and toss your dataclasses multiple times per second.

The attribute access is probably the more important metric, and while dataclasses are again slower (~1.25 times), this time it's not by that much.

If you think that's still a tad too slow, you can tune your dataclass (or any classes, really) by using slots instead of a dictionary to store their attributes:


Slotted dataclass

# dataclass creation
$ python -m timeit -s "from dataclasses import dataclass" -s "@dataclass" -s "class A: __slots__ = ('var',); var: int" "A(1)" 
1000000 loops, best of 5: 242 nsec per loop

# dataclass attribute access
$ python -m timeit -s "from dataclasses import dataclass" -s "@dataclass" -s "class A: __slots__ = ('var',); var: int" -s "a = A(1)" "a.var"
10000000 loops, best of 5: 21.7 nsec per loop

By using this pattern we could shave off a few more more nanoseconds. At this point, at least regarding attribute access, there shouldn't be a noticeable difference to dictionaries any more, and you can use the upsides of dataclasses without compromising speed.

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    Thanks for your answer! It's very complete in a succinct way and solved all my doubts! Mar 20, 2019 at 12:51
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    @SérgioMafra Glad I could help =)
    – Arne
    Mar 20, 2019 at 15:18
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    Try to create 10 000 dataclasses from the list of dicts. This will take really a lot of time, accessing is not a problem, the problem is the creation, that is very slow.
    – Mejmo
    Nov 11, 2021 at 11:24
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    Python3.10 now ships with @dataclass(slots=True)! This emulates the functionality of the slotted dataclass demonstrated. Using python -m timeit -s "from dataclasses import dataclass" -s "@dataclass(slots=True)" -s "class A: var: int" "A(1)" for creation and python -m timeit -s "from dataclasses import dataclass" -s "@dataclass(slots=True)" -s "class A: var: int" -s "a = A(1)" "a.var" for access, timing is identical to my running of your slotted dataclasses example. Mar 31 at 4:55
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@Arne has an excellent answer and proved that dicts are indeed the faster of the two. Let me just add a couple things:

As I mentioned in my comment here, as-of Python 3.10, there is the @dataclass(slots=True) option that creates a dataclass with slot members, exactly as in the faster of Arne's examples. Not much reason to ever not use slots=True, unless you know you need it.

Now on to the other, lesser known alternative. One of the main reasons you might pick a dataclass over a dict is for IDE hints (e.g. intellisense) and a sanity check that the expected key exists. Since python 3.8, there has been the PEP589 TypedDict, which does allows that for the standard format of a dictionary. Consider the following:

from typing import TypedDict

class Movie(TypedDict):
    name: str
    year: int

movie: Movie = {'name': 'Blade Runner',
                'year': 1982}

In this case, your IDE will be able to hint to you which keys are valid, and show a correct init function:

IDE screenshot access IDE screenshot init

Additionally, mypy will be able to tell you if there's an error in key access; more or less, TypedDicts get you a few of the big dataclass benefits without using dataclasses. Overall, it's a good solution in cases where you're working with dictionaries already, or still need dictionary things like easy nestability and slightly better performance.* See the above PEP link for lots of good examples.

* the performance numbers are trivial - if dataclasses make your life easier, use them. Don't prematurely optimize to something that isn't a shoe-in. Too many programmers make things harder for themselves trying to shave off nanosecnds rather than taking a look at the bigger picture of what their code is doing.

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