314

I'm working on an Extension in Chrome, and I'm wondering: what's the best way to find out when an element comes into existence? Using plain javascript, with an interval that checks until an element exists, or does jQuery have some easy way to do this?

8
  • 1
    Looks like every single option here today (including from comments) is either outdated or incomplete. They don't consider @hughsk's awesome input fully, the compatibility argument. Meanwhile I'd recommend simply using Brandon's update on Ryan's answer for general simplicity and less risk of overhead, I suppose.
    – cregox
    Apr 1 '15 at 23:17
  • 4
    MutationObserver > DOM Mutation Events > setTimeout.
    – mattsven
    Apr 2 '15 at 15:28
  • 2
    Not from where I stand. setTimeout is compatible, simple to implement, simple to maintain, and has negligible overhead.
    – cregox
    Apr 2 '15 at 16:07
  • 1
    (...I can't count)
    – mattsven
    Apr 2 '15 at 19:26
  • 6
    There are 3 kinds of people: those who can count and those who can't. ;P
    – cregox
    Apr 3 '15 at 4:46

23 Answers 23

201

DOMNodeInserted is being deprecated, along with the other DOM mutation events, because of performance issues - the recommended approach is to use a MutationObserver to watch the DOM. It's only supported in newer browsers though, so you should fall back onto DOMNodeInserted when MutationObserver isn't available.

let observer = new MutationObserver((mutations) => {
  mutations.forEach((mutation) => {
    if (!mutation.addedNodes) return

    for (let i = 0; i < mutation.addedNodes.length; i++) {
      // do things to your newly added nodes here
      let node = mutation.addedNodes[i]
    }
  })
})

observer.observe(document.body, {
    childList: true
  , subtree: true
  , attributes: false
  , characterData: false
})

// stop watching using:
observer.disconnect()
13
  • 68
    I've always found MutationObserver api a bit complex so I've built a library, arrive.js, to provide a simpler api to listen for elements creation/removal. Apr 17 '14 at 18:23
  • 20
    I recommend using @UzairFarooq excellent library github.com/uzairfarooq/arrive
    – Dennis
    Jul 14 '14 at 15:13
  • 3
    Two things to note: (1) It would be better to do if (mutation.addedNodes.length) since if (mutation.addedNodes) would still return true even if it's an empty array. (2) You can't do mutation.addedNodes.forEach() because addedNodes is a nodeList and you can't iterate through a nodeList with forEach. For a solution to this, see toddmotto.com/ditch-the-array-foreach-call-nodelist-hack
    – thdoan
    Jan 15 '15 at 4:57
  • 4
    Can you give an example of how one would use this? Not sure where to put my jquery selector or code I want executed when DOM element exists. May 30 '18 at 13:12
  • 1
    @Superdooperhero I made an answer with easy example. Check it. stackoverflow.com/a/57395241/6542186 Aug 7 '19 at 13:10
120

Here is a core JavaScript function to wait for the display of an element (well, its insertion into the DOM to be more accurate).

// Call the below function
waitForElementToDisplay("#div1",function(){alert("Hi");},1000,9000);

function waitForElementToDisplay(selector, callback, checkFrequencyInMs, timeoutInMs) {
  var startTimeInMs = Date.now();
  (function loopSearch() {
    if (document.querySelector(selector) != null) {
      callback();
      return;
    }
    else {
      setTimeout(function () {
        if (timeoutInMs && Date.now() - startTimeInMs > timeoutInMs)
          return;
        loopSearch();
      }, checkFrequencyInMs);
    }
  })();
}

This call will look for the HTML tag whose id="div1" every 1000 milliseconds. If the element is found, it will display an alert message Hi. If no element is found after 9000 milliseconds, this function stops its execution.

Parameters:

  1. selector: String : This function looks for the element ${selector}.
  2. callback: Function : This is a function that will be called if the element is found.
  3. checkFrequencyInMs: Number : This function checks whether this element exists every ${checkFrequencyInMs} milliseconds.
  4. timeoutInMs : Number : Optional. This function stops looking for the element after ${timeoutInMs} milliseconds.

NB : Selectors are explained at https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Document/querySelector

10
119

I was having this same problem, so I went ahead and wrote a plugin for it.

$(selector).waitUntilExists(function);

Code:

;(function ($, window) {

var intervals = {};
var removeListener = function(selector) {

    if (intervals[selector]) {

        window.clearInterval(intervals[selector]);
        intervals[selector] = null;
    }
};
var found = 'waitUntilExists.found';

/**
 * @function
 * @property {object} jQuery plugin which runs handler function once specified
 *           element is inserted into the DOM
 * @param {function|string} handler 
 *            A function to execute at the time when the element is inserted or 
 *            string "remove" to remove the listener from the given selector
 * @param {bool} shouldRunHandlerOnce 
 *            Optional: if true, handler is unbound after its first invocation
 * @example jQuery(selector).waitUntilExists(function);
 */

$.fn.waitUntilExists = function(handler, shouldRunHandlerOnce, isChild) {

    var selector = this.selector;
    var $this = $(selector);
    var $elements = $this.not(function() { return $(this).data(found); });

    if (handler === 'remove') {

        // Hijack and remove interval immediately if the code requests
        removeListener(selector);
    }
    else {

        // Run the handler on all found elements and mark as found
        $elements.each(handler).data(found, true);

        if (shouldRunHandlerOnce && $this.length) {

            // Element was found, implying the handler already ran for all 
            // matched elements
            removeListener(selector);
        }
        else if (!isChild) {

            // If this is a recurring search or if the target has not yet been 
            // found, create an interval to continue searching for the target
            intervals[selector] = window.setInterval(function () {

                $this.waitUntilExists(handler, shouldRunHandlerOnce, true);
            }, 500);
        }
    }

    return $this;
};

}(jQuery, window));
11
  • 6
    Thank you for the plugin. I forked and improved it a bit. Feel free to take whatever you want from my update. I have a few more improvements planned, still: updated plugin Jun 4 '13 at 21:46
  • 12
    would be nice without jquery dep too... ;)
    – knutole
    Jul 25 '13 at 15:30
  • 5
    maybe you should mention how it works: it works by asking every 500 ms if the element exists (using a window.setInterval). I don't know if the MutationObserver answer works by polling as well...
    – sports
    Mar 30 '15 at 21:18
  • 2
    It does not work properly if the element is already on the page. Here is the proper version of this function: gist.github.com/PizzaBrandon/5709010 Feb 24 '16 at 7:09
  • 2
    Can you please explain what is the use of ; in the beginning of the function ( ;(function ($, window) { ) ?
    – mrid
    Dec 23 '16 at 10:36
89
+100

Here is a simple solution using the MutationObserver api.

  1. No jQuery
  2. No Timer
  3. No third party libraries
  4. Promise based and works well with async/await

I have used it in several projects.

function waitForElm(selector) {
    return new Promise(resolve => {
        if (document.querySelector(selector)) {
            return resolve(document.querySelector(selector));
        }

        const observer = new MutationObserver(mutations => {
            if (document.querySelector(selector)) {
                resolve(document.querySelector(selector));
                observer.disconnect();
            }
        });

        observer.observe(document.body, {
            childList: true,
            subtree: true
        });
    });
}

To use it:

waitForElm('.some-class').then((elm) => {
    console.log('Element is ready');
    console.log(elm.textContent);
});

Or with async/await:

const elm = await waitForElm('.some-class');
4
  • 2
    This is neat! The cool part about it is that you could use it with async / await too. You might also be able squeeze more performance out of it by doing mutations.addedNodes.find(node => node.matchesSelector("..."))
    – mattsven
    Apr 29 '20 at 21:37
  • @mattsven Good point! Checking just the nodes in the mutations is more performant than doing document.querySelector.
    – Yong Wang
    Apr 29 '20 at 22:56
  • This is awesome, thanks. But what is the purpose of that mutations param inside the observer constant? Jul 14 '21 at 23:09
  • 1
    @RalphDavidAbernathy, you are right, the mutations param is not used in the code and can be safely deleted. It has a lot of useful information on what is mutated. I put it there just in case you need to access it.
    – Yong Wang
    Oct 22 '21 at 16:59
39

I used this approach to wait for an element to appear so I can execute the other functions after that.

Let's say doTheRestOfTheStuff(parameters) function should only be called after the element with ID the_Element_ID appears or finished loading, we can use,

var existCondition = setInterval(function() {
 if ($('#the_Element_ID').length) {
    console.log("Exists!");
    clearInterval(existCondition);
    doTheRestOfTheStuff(parameters);
 }
}, 100); // check every 100ms
1
  • Simple and easy.
    – Rob
    Nov 5 '21 at 4:45
25

You can listen to DOMNodeInserted or DOMSubtreeModified events which fire whenever a new element is added to the DOM.

There is also LiveQuery jQuery plugin which would detect when a new element is created:

$("#future_element").livequery(function(){
    //element created
});
3
  • 1
    Very nice plugin! Is there any function like that in jquery directly? I'm wondering that there is no existing feature to do that. And if this is THE plugin, please vote up for this answer ;) For me, it works perfectly. Thank you very much.
    – Samuel
    Aug 10 '12 at 20:35
  • 1
    Note IE 9 implements DOMNodeInserted but has a major bug where it won't fire when you add an element for the time, which is most of the time when you'd want to use it. Details are at: help.dottoro.com/ljmcxjla.php Dec 3 '12 at 11:48
  • DOMSubtreeModified is deprecated in favor of the Mutation Observer API Jan 7 at 3:08
25

I think that still there isnt any answer here with easy and readable working example. Use MutationObserver interface to detect DOM changes, like this:

var observer = new MutationObserver(function(mutations) {
    if ($("p").length) {
        console.log("Exist, lets do something");
        observer.disconnect(); 
        //We can disconnect observer once the element exist if we dont want observe more changes in the DOM
    }
});

// Start observing
observer.observe(document.body, { //document.body is node target to observe
    childList: true, //This is a must have for the observer with subtree
    subtree: true //Set to true if changes must also be observed in descendants.
});
            
$(document).ready(function() {
    $("button").on("click", function() {
        $("p").remove();
        setTimeout(function() {
            $("#newContent").append("<p>New element</p>");
        }, 2000);
    });
});
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<button>New content</button>
<div id="newContent"></div>

Note: Spanish Mozilla docs about MutationObserver are more detailed if you want more information.

1
  • 3
    Consider leave a comment explainning the reason of downvote, so I can improve my answer. Thanks. Aug 9 '19 at 9:17
21

You can do

$('#yourelement').ready(function() {

});

Please note that this will only work if the element is present in the DOM when being requested from the server. If the element is being dynamically added via JavaScript, it will not work and you may need to look at the other answers.

6
  • 9
    The .ready() function works for most anything (if not anything), not just document. It just won't work with dynamically created elements, even on .live(). Apr 2 '11 at 18:47
  • 8
    @Bery, as Richard pointed out, this works only for elements which are already present in the HTML when it's first requested from the server. If Javascript is used to add an element dynamically to the DOM, it doesn't work. Jan 30 '13 at 12:11
  • 6
    @Sam, can you please clarify how to attach it to the reference of the element in memory? Feb 19 '14 at 17:48
  • 5
    This answer is incorrect. What you're actually checking here is a regular $(document).ready(), not the element you think it will apply too. That's just how this special listener works. Example
    – Shikkediel
    Feb 2 '16 at 18:34
  • 2
    This usage is not recommended according to api.jquery.com/ready
    – splintor
    Jan 10 '18 at 7:37
21

Update

Below there is an updated version that works with promises. It also "stops" if a specific number of tries is reached.

  function _waitForElement(selector, delay = 50, tries = 250) {
    const element = document.querySelector(selector);

    if (!window[`__${selector}`]) {
      window[`__${selector}`] = 0;
    }

    function _search() {
      return new Promise((resolve) => {
        window[`__${selector}`]++;
        console.log(window[`__${selector}`]);
        setTimeout(resolve, delay);
      });
    }

    if (element === null) {
      if (window[`__${selector}`] >= tries) {
        window[`__${selector}`] = 0;
        return Promise.reject(null);
      }

      return _search().then(() => _waitForElement(selector));
    } else {
      return Promise.resolve(element);
    }
  }

Usage is very simple, to use it with await just make sure you're within an async function:

const start = (async () => {
  const $el = await _waitForElement(`.my-selector`);
  console.log($el);
})();

Outdated version

Simply add the selector you want. Once the element is found you can have access to in the callback function.

const waitUntilElementExists = (selector, callback) => {
const el = document.querySelector(selector);

if (el){
    return callback(el);
}

setTimeout(() => waitUntilElementExists(selector, callback), 500);
}

waitUntilElementExists('.wait-for-me', (el) => console.log(el));
6
  • 2
    PossessWithin agree, this is a very clean solution and works for me.
    – jstafford
    Aug 2 '19 at 1:33
  • 3
    This answer works on IE8-10 as well as modern browsers. The main problem is that it will keep running if the element does not exist - so its best when are you are sure the element is going to be there. Otherwise, you could add a counter. Aug 17 '19 at 16:54
  • 1
    Worked perfectly for me Sep 4 '19 at 15:48
  • 1
    Worked like charm !!
    – Aman
    Oct 11 '19 at 22:39
  • 1
    You were down voted most likely because similar answers exists here and they were posted in 2012 and 2015 e.g. stackoverflow.com/a/29754070/2103767
    – bhantol
    Nov 19 '19 at 15:51
15

For a simple approach using jQuery I've found this to work well:

  // Wait for element to exist.
  function elementLoaded(el, cb) {
    if ($(el).length) {
      // Element is now loaded.
      cb($(el));
    } else {
      // Repeat every 500ms.
      setTimeout(function() {
        elementLoaded(el, cb)
      }, 500);
    }
  };

  elementLoaded('.element-selector', function(el) {
    // Element is ready to use.
    el.click(function() {
      alert("You just clicked a dynamically inserted element");
    });
  });

Here we simply check every 500ms to see whether the element is loaded, when it is, we can use it.

This is especially useful for adding click handlers to elements which have been dynamically added to the document.

9

Here's a function that acts as a thin wrapper around MutationObserver. The only requirement is that the browser support MutationObserver; there is no dependency on JQuery. Run the snippet below to see a working example.

function waitForMutation(parentNode, isMatchFunc, handlerFunc, observeSubtree, disconnectAfterMatch) {
  var defaultIfUndefined = function(val, defaultVal) {
    return (typeof val === "undefined") ? defaultVal : val;
  };

  observeSubtree = defaultIfUndefined(observeSubtree, false);
  disconnectAfterMatch = defaultIfUndefined(disconnectAfterMatch, false);

  var observer = new MutationObserver(function(mutations) {
    mutations.forEach(function(mutation) {
      if (mutation.addedNodes) {
        for (var i = 0; i < mutation.addedNodes.length; i++) {
          var node = mutation.addedNodes[i];
          if (isMatchFunc(node)) {
            handlerFunc(node);
            if (disconnectAfterMatch) observer.disconnect();
          };
        }
      }
    });
  });

  observer.observe(parentNode, {
    childList: true,
    attributes: false,
    characterData: false,
    subtree: observeSubtree
  });
}

// Example
waitForMutation(
  // parentNode: Root node to observe. If the mutation you're looking for
  // might not occur directly below parentNode, pass 'true' to the
  // observeSubtree parameter.
  document.getElementById("outerContent"),
  // isMatchFunc: Function to identify a match. If it returns true,
  // handlerFunc will run.
  // MutationObserver only fires once per mutation, not once for every node
  // inside the mutation. If the element we're looking for is a child of
  // the newly-added element, we need to use something like
  // node.querySelector() to find it.
  function(node) {
    return node.querySelector(".foo") !== null;
  },
  // handlerFunc: Handler.
  function(node) {
    var elem = document.createElement("div");
    elem.appendChild(document.createTextNode("Added node (" + node.innerText + ")"));
    document.getElementById("log").appendChild(elem);
  },
  // observeSubtree
  true,
  // disconnectAfterMatch: If this is true the hanlerFunc will only run on
  // the first time that isMatchFunc returns true. If it's false, the handler
  // will continue to fire on matches.
  false);

// Set up UI. Using JQuery here for convenience.

$outerContent = $("#outerContent");
$innerContent = $("#innerContent");

$("#addOuter").on("click", function() {
  var newNode = $("<div><span class='foo'>Outer</span></div>");
  $outerContent.append(newNode);
});
$("#addInner").on("click", function() {
  var newNode = $("<div><span class='foo'>Inner</span></div>");
  $innerContent.append(newNode);
});
.content {
  padding: 1em;
  border: solid 1px black;
  overflow-y: auto;
}
#innerContent {
  height: 100px;
}
#outerContent {
  height: 200px;
}
#log {
  font-family: Courier;
  font-size: 10pt;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<h2>Create some mutations</h2>
<div id="main">
  <button id="addOuter">Add outer node</button>
  <button id="addInner">Add inner node</button>
  <div class="content" id="outerContent">
    <div class="content" id="innerContent"></div>
  </div>
</div>
<h2>Log</h2>
<div id="log"></div>

9

How about the insertionQuery library?

insertionQuery uses CSS Animation callbacks attached to the selector(s) specified to run a callback when an element is created. This method allows callbacks to be run whenever an element is created, not just the first time.

From github:

Non-dom-event way to catch nodes showing up. And it uses selectors.

It's not just for wider browser support, It can be better than DOMMutationObserver for certain things.

Why?

  • Because DOM Events slow down the browser and insertionQuery doesn't
  • Because DOM Mutation Observer has less browser support than insertionQuery
  • Because with insertionQuery you can filter DOM changes using selectors without performance overhead!

Widespread support!

IE10+ and mostly anything else (including mobile)

0
7

Here's a Promise-returning solution in vanilla Javascript (no messy callbacks). By default it checks every 200ms.

function waitFor(selector) {
    return new Promise(function (res, rej) {
        waitForElementToDisplay(selector, 200);
        function waitForElementToDisplay(selector, time) {
            if (document.querySelector(selector) != null) {
                res(document.querySelector(selector));
            }
            else {
                setTimeout(function () {
                    waitForElementToDisplay(selector, time);
                }, time);
            }
        }
    });
}
6

Here's a pure Javascript function which allows you to wait for anything. Set the interval longer to take less CPU resource.

/**
 * @brief Wait for something to be ready before triggering a timeout
 * @param {callback} isready Function which returns true when the thing we're waiting for has happened
 * @param {callback} success Function to call when the thing is ready
 * @param {callback} error Function to call if we time out before the event becomes ready
 * @param {int} count Number of times to retry the timeout (default 300 or 6s)
 * @param {int} interval Number of milliseconds to wait between attempts (default 20ms)
 */
function waitUntil(isready, success, error, count, interval){
    if (count === undefined) {
        count = 300;
    }
    if (interval === undefined) {
        interval = 20;
    }
    if (isready()) {
        success();
        return;
    }
    // The call back isn't ready. We need to wait for it
    setTimeout(function(){
        if (!count) {
            // We have run out of retries
            if (error !== undefined) {
                error();
            }
        } else {
            // Try again
            waitUntil(isready, success, error, count -1, interval);
        }
    }, interval);
}

To call this, for example in jQuery, use something like:

waitUntil(function(){
    return $('#myelement').length > 0;
}, function(){
    alert("myelement now exists");
}, function(){
    alert("I'm bored. I give up.");
});
4

You can try this:

const wait_until_element_appear = setInterval(() => {
    if ($(element).length !== 0) {
        // some code
        clearInterval(wait_until_element_appear);
    }
}, 0);

This solution works very good for me

1
  • 2
    Clean and concise. You may want to increase the interval ie. to 500ms, and maybe add a retry counter to avoid infinite loop.
    – m3nda
    Jul 5 '21 at 10:33
3

A solution returning a Promise and allowing to use a timeout (compatible IE 11+).

For a single element (type Element):

"use strict";

function waitUntilElementLoaded(selector) {
    var timeout = arguments.length > 1 && arguments[1] !== undefined ? arguments[1] : 0;

    var start = performance.now();
    var now = 0;

    return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        var interval = setInterval(function () {
            var element = document.querySelector(selector);

            if (element instanceof Element) {
                clearInterval(interval);

                resolve();
            }

            now = performance.now();

            if (now - start >= timeout) {
                reject("Could not find the element " + selector + " within " + timeout + " ms");
            }
        }, 100);
    });
}

For multiple elements (type NodeList):

"use strict";

function waitUntilElementsLoaded(selector) {
    var timeout = arguments.length > 1 && arguments[1] !== undefined ? arguments[1] : 0;

    var start = performance.now();
    var now = 0;

    return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        var interval = setInterval(function () {
            var elements = document.querySelectorAll(selector);

            if (elements instanceof NodeList) {
                clearInterval(interval);

                resolve(elements);
            }

            now = performance.now();

            if (now - start >= timeout) {
                reject("Could not find elements " + selector + " within " + timeout + " ms");
            }
        }, 100);
    });
}

Examples:

waitUntilElementLoaded('#message', 800).then(function(element) {
    // element found and available

    element.innerHTML = '...';
}).catch(function() {
    // element not found within 800 milliseconds
});

waitUntilElementsLoaded('.message', 10000).then(function(elements) {
    for(const element of elements) {
        // ....
    }
}).catch(function(error) {
    // elements not found withing 10 seconds
});

Works for both a list of elements and a single element.

2
  • 1
    My favorite solution! Why check element instanceof HTMLElement? Can it ever be anything other than null or HTMLElement?
    – Leeroy
    Nov 14 '19 at 17:59
  • 1
    You raise an interesting point. I should have make it broader by using Element instead (fixed). I just make the check because I want to be sure the variable element has the property innerHTML as the Element MDN documentation states. Feel free to remove it if you do not care about it!
    – Anwar
    Nov 14 '19 at 22:14
2

A cleaner example using MutationObserver:

new MutationObserver( mutation => {
    if (!mutation.addedNodes) return
    mutation.addedNodes.forEach( node => {
        // do stuff with node
    })
})
0
2

I usually use this snippet for Tag Manager:

<script>
(function exists() {
  if (!document.querySelector('<selector>')) {
    return setTimeout(exists);
  }
  // code when element exists
})();  
</script>
2

I have developed an answer inspired by Jamie Hutber's.

It's a promise based function where you can set:

  • maximum number of tries - default 10;
  • delay in milliseconds - default 100 ms.

Therefore, by default, it will wait 1 second until the element appears on the DOM.

If it does not show up it will return a promise.reject with null so you can handle the error as per your wish.

Code


function waitForElement(selector, delay = 1000, tries = 10) {
  const element = document.querySelector(selector);

  // creates a local variable w/ the name of the selector to keep track of all tries
  if (!window[`__${selector}`]) {
    window[`__${selector}`] = 0;
  }

  function _search() {
    return new Promise((resolve) => {
      window[`__${selector}`]++;
      console.log(window[`__${selector}`]);
      setTimeout(resolve, delay);
    });
  }

  //element not found, retry
  if (element === null) {
    if (window[`__${selector}`] >= tries) {
      window[`__${selector}`] = 0;
      return Promise.reject(null);
    }

    return _search().then(() => waitForElement(selector));
  } else {
    return Promise.resolve(element);
  }
}

Usage:

async function wait(){
    try{
        const $el = await waitForElement(".llama");
        console.log($el);
    } catch(err){
        console.error("Timeout - couldn't find element.")
    }
} 

wait();

In the example above it will wait for the selector .llama. You can add a greater delay and test it here on the console of StackoverFlow.

Just add the class llama to any element on the DOM.

2

The observe function below will allow you to listen to elements via a selector.

In the following example, after 2 seconds have passed, a .greeting will be inserted into the .container. Since we are listening to the insertion of this element, we can have a callback that triggers upon insertion.

const observe = (selector, callback, targetNode = document.body) =>
  new MutationObserver(mutations => [...mutations]
    .flatMap((mutation) => [...mutation.addedNodes])
    .filter((node) => node.matches && node.matches(selector))
    .forEach(callback))
  .observe(targetNode, { childList: true, subtree: true });

const createGreeting = () => {
  const el = document.createElement('DIV');
  el.textContent = 'Hello World';
  el.classList.add('greeting');
  return el;
};

const container = document.querySelector('.container');

observe('.greeting', el => console.log('I have arrived!', el), container);

new Promise(res => setTimeout(() => res(createGreeting()), 2000))
  .then(el => container.appendChild(el));
html, body { width: 100%; height: 100%; margin: 0; padding: 0; }
body { display: flex; }
.container { display: flex; flex: 1; align-items: center; justify-content: center; }
.greeting { font-weight: bold; font-size: 2em; }
<div class="container"></div>

1

If you want it to stop looking after a while (timeout) then the following jQuery will work. It will time out after 10sec. I needed to use this code rather than pure JS because I needed to select an input via name and was having trouble implementing some of the other solutions.

 // Wait for element to exist.

    function imageLoaded(el, cb,time) {

        if ($(el).length) {
            // Element is now loaded.

            cb($(el));

            var imageInput =  $('input[name=product\\[image_location\\]]');
            console.log(imageInput);

        } else if(time < 10000) {
            // Repeat every 500ms.
            setTimeout(function() {
               time = time+500;

                imageLoaded(el, cb, time)
            }, 500);
        }
    };

    var time = 500;

    imageLoaded('input[name=product\\[image_location\\]]', function(el) {

     //do stuff here 

     },time);
0

Simple Javascript.

cont elementExist = setInterval(() => {
    var elm = document.getElementById("elementId")
    if (elm!=null)
         // call your function here to do something
        clearInterval(elementExist);
    }
}, 100);

Note: This will block other executions

-2

if you have async dom changes, this function checks (with time limit in seconds) for the DOM elements, it will not be heavy for the DOM and its Promise based :)

function getElement(selector, i = 5) {
  return new Promise(async (resolve, reject) => {
    if(i <= 0) return reject(`${selector} not found`);
    const elements = document.querySelectorAll(selector);
    if(elements.length) return resolve(elements);
    return setTimeout(async () => await getElement(selector, i-1), 1000);
  })
}

// Now call it with your selector

try {
  element = await getElement('.woohoo');
} catch(e) { // catch the e }

//OR

getElement('.woohoo', 5)
.then(element => { // do somthing with the elements })
.catch(e => { // catch the error });
3
  • I test your solution, it returns the element if i = 5 and element is found; it returns 'selector is not found' if i <= 0; but if 0 < i < 5, and element is found, nothing is returned, seems hang
    – tiplip
    Dec 5 '20 at 5:25
  • Never pass an async function as the executor to new Promise! Similarly, that function expression you pass to setTimeout has no reason to be async. Although you should only wrap the setTimeout in new Promise, nothing else, anyway.
    – Bergi
    Dec 5 '20 at 15:16
  • 2
    In fact, this doesn't even work, as you never resolve the return promise if the element is not found on the first try.
    – Bergi
    Dec 5 '20 at 15:23

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