1

I have a file like this:

AAKRKA HIST1H1B AAGAGAAKRKATGPP
AAKRKA HIST1H1E RKSAGAAKRKASGPP
AAKRLN ACAT1 LMTADAAKRLNVTPL
AAKRLN SUCLG2 NEALEAAKRLNAKEI
AAKRLR GTF2F1 VSEMPAAKRLRLDTG
AAKRMA VCL NDIIAAAKRMALLMA
AAKRPL WIZ YLGSVAAKRPLQEDR
AAKRQK MTA2 SSSQPAAKRQKLNPA

I would like to kind of merge 2 lines if they are exactly the same in the 1st column. The desired output is:

AAKRKA HIST1H1B,HIST1H1E AAGAGAAKRKATGPP,RKSAGAAKRKASGPP
AAKRLN ACAT1,SUCLG2 LMTADAAKRLNVTPL,NEALEAAKRLNAKEI
AAKRLR GTF2F1 VSEMPAAKRLRLDTG
AAKRMA VCL NDIIAAAKRMALLMA
AAKRPL WIZ YLGSVAAKRPLQEDR
AAKRQK MTA2 SSSQPAAKRQKLNPA

Sometimes there could be more than two lines starting with the same word. How could I reach the desired output with bash/awk?

Thanks for help!

  • 1
    Are the "duplicate" lines always consecutive? – glenn jackman Mar 20 at 15:33
1

Since this resembles SQL like group operations, you can use sqlite which is available in bash

with the given inputs

$ cat aqua.txt
AAKRKA HIST1H1B AAGAGAAKRKATGPP
AAKRKA HIST1H1E RKSAGAAKRKASGPP
AAKRLN ACAT1 LMTADAAKRLNVTPL
AAKRLN SUCLG2 NEALEAAKRLNAKEI
AAKRLR GTF2F1 VSEMPAAKRLRLDTG
AAKRMA VCL NDIIAAAKRMALLMA
AAKRPL WIZ YLGSVAAKRPLQEDR
AAKRQK MTA2 SSSQPAAKRQKLNPA

$

Script:

$ cat ./sqlite_join.sh
#!/bin/sh
sqlite3 << EOF
create table data(a,b,c);
.separator ' '
.import $1 data
select a, group_concat(b) , group_concat(c) from data group by a;
EOF

$ 

Results

$ ./sqlite_join.sh aqua.txt
AAKRKA HIST1H1B,HIST1H1E AAGAGAAKRKATGPP,RKSAGAAKRKASGPP
AAKRLN ACAT1,SUCLG2 LMTADAAKRLNVTPL,NEALEAAKRLNAKEI
AAKRLR GTF2F1 VSEMPAAKRLRLDTG
AAKRMA VCL NDIIAAAKRMALLMA
AAKRPL WIZ YLGSVAAKRPLQEDR
AAKRQK MTA2 SSSQPAAKRQKLNPA

$
  • Wow, that works like a charm. I had no idea of sqlite, but definitely have to learn! – aqua Mar 21 at 8:25
  • @aqua.. glad that it helped you.. yes sqlite can solve these kind of problems better than awk.. – stack0114106 Mar 21 at 8:34
1

This is a two-liner in awk; the first line stores the second and third fields in associative arrays indexed by the first field, accumulating fields with identical indices with leading commas before each field, and the second line iterates over the two arrays, deleting the leading comma on output:

{ second[$1] = second[$1] "," $2; third[$1] = third[$1] "," $3 }
END { for (i in second) print i, substr(second[i],2), substr(third[i],2) }

I made no assumptions about the order of the input or the output. If you want sorted output, pipe the output through sort. You can run the program at https://ideone.com/sbgLNk.

0

try this:

DATAFILE=data.txt

cut -d " " -f1 < $DATAFILE | sort | uniq |
while read key; do
    column1="$key"
    column2=""
    column3=""
    grep "$key" $DATAFILE |
    while read line; do
        set -- $line
        [ -n "$column2" ] && [ -n "$2" ] && column2="$column2,"
        [ -n "$column3" ] && [ -n "$3" ] && column3="$column3,"
        column2="$column2$2"
        column3="$column3$3"        
        echo "$column1 $column2 $column3"
    done | tail -n1
done

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