1

If I have 2 objects like this:

var obj1 = {'a': [2, 3, 4], 'b': [5, 5, 5]}
var obj2 = {'a': [1, 1, 1], 'b': [2, 2, 2]}

How can I obtain a third object like this:

obj3 = {'a': [1, 2, 3], 'b': [3, 3, 3]} // difference between obj1 and obj2

I tried, but with no result:

var obj1 = {'a': [2, 3, 4], 'b': [5, 5, 5]}
var obj2 = {'a': [1, 1, 1], 'b': [2, 2, 2]}
var obj3 = Object.keys(obj1).filter(k => obj1[k] - obj2[k]);
console.log(obj3)

2
4

You can use a Object.keys() and .forEach() methods call to iterate over the keys and do the required calculations.

This is how should be your code:

var res = {};
Object.keys(obj1).forEach(function(k){
   res[k] = obj1[k].map((v,i) => v - obj2[k][i]);
});

Demo:

var obj1 = {'a': [2, 3, 4], 'b': [5, 5, 5]}
var obj2 = {'a': [1, 1, 1], 'b': [2, 2, 2]}
var res = {};
Object.keys(obj1).forEach(function(k){
   res[k] = obj1[k].map((v,i) => v - obj2[k][i]);
});

console.log(res);

2
  • Not actually a need for forEach of the keys, when for..in will work just as well without accessing another object than the one given
    – mplungjan
    Mar 21 '19 at 6:59
  • @mplungjan Yes you are right about that, but they are two ways of doing things, thanks for pointing it out anyway. :)
    – cнŝdk
    Mar 21 '19 at 7:38
3

An example using reduce and map.

EDIT: I documented some steps to help you understand what's happening.

/**
 * Returns the difference between each value in an array
 * positioned at each key listed in keys between objA and objB.
 *
 * @param {Object} objA - Every key should container an array of numbers to diff.
 * @param {Object} objB - Should match structure with objA.
 * @param {string[]} [keys] - Optional array with keys to diff, by default uses all the keys.
 * @returns {Object} - Object matching objA structure with diff'ed values in each key.
 */ 
function keyDiff(objA, objB, keys=Object.keys(objA)) {

  // Array.reduce "reduces" an array to a single object using using a function.
  // Function receives 2 arguments:
  // - Accumelated value (val, result of previous steps in every iteration).
  // - Current iterated value of array (key).
  return keys.reduce(function(acc, key) {
    
    // Array.map "maps" one array to another using a function.
    // Function receives 2 arguments:
    // - Current iterated value of array (v).
    // - Current iterator index (index).
    //
    // Current reducer value "key" is used to map objA values for key to
    // differnce with objB. This is done at the position specied by map index.
    // The result is set to the accumulater "acc" object which gets returned
    // at the end of the reducer.
    acc[key] = objA[key].map(function(v, index) {
      // Subtract objB value from objA value
      return v - objB[key][index];
    })
  
    // Return the new accumelator "acc" value.
    // The returned value of each step in the reducer is accumulator "acc".
    // This is the first value in the function passed as argument in the reducer.
    return acc;

  // By Default "null" is the inital accumulator value.
  // Since we need an object to start with we specify "{}" as the inital value.
  }, {});
}

var obj1 = {'a': [2, 3, 4], 'b': [5, 5, 5]}
var obj2 = {'a': [1, 1, 1], 'b': [2, 2, 2]}

var obj3 = keyDiff(obj1, obj2);
console.log(obj3);

6
  • I do not understand the choice of reduce when there is a one to one number of results
    – mplungjan
    Mar 20 '19 at 16:28
  • The expected result should be an object, not an array. If the input is an array and the output is an array use Array.map. If the input is an array and the output is a primitive or (non-iterable) object use Array.reduce. Mar 20 '19 at 16:54
  • Right - missed that one
    – mplungjan
    Mar 20 '19 at 17:24
  • Mine is still way easier to grasp in my opinion. Saving the creation of obj3 first is outweighed by the lack of readability stackoverflow.com/a/55264605/295783 - still voted up
    – mplungjan
    Mar 20 '19 at 17:30
  • Arguably yes, But being correct outweighs readable IMO. Especially when answering a question. Also, this example is a bit verbose in order to be es5 compatible and documented. It can probably be a one liner. Mar 20 '19 at 18:02
2

You could take an iterative and recursive approach which works for any depth objects.

function delta(a, b) {
    return typeof a === 'object'
        ? Object.assign(
            Array.isArray(a) ? [] : {},
            ...Object.keys(a).map(k => ({ [k]: delta(a[k], b[k]) }))
        )
        : a - b;
}

var obj1 = { a: [2, 3, 4], b: [5, 5, 5] },
    obj2 = { a: [1, 1, 1], b: [2, 2, 2] },
    result = delta(obj1, obj2);

console.log(result);
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

2

This is the simplest version I could create.

const obj1 = { 'a': [2, 3, 4],'b': [5, 5, 5]};
const obj2 = { 'a': [1, 1, 1],'b': [2, 2, 2]};
let   obj3 = {};

for (k in obj1) {
   obj3[k] = obj1[k].map((v, i) => v - obj2[k][i])
};
console.log(obj3)

1

How about this

var obj1 = {'a': [2, 3, 4], 'b': [5, 5, 5]}
var obj2 = {'a': [1, 1, 1], 'b': [2, 2, 2]}

var resultObj = {};

for(var i in obj1) {
  var firstObjArray = obj1[i];
  var secondObjArray = obj2[i];
  var differenceArray = firstObjArray.map(function(a, index) {
    return firstObjArray[index] - secondObjArray[index]
  });
  resultObj[i] = differenceArray;
}

console.log(resultObj)
1

You could use Array.map() to create a reusable array subtraction function.

After that, it'd be a matter of simply looping through the object keys and performing that function on the matching keys.

var obj1 = {'a': [2, 3, 4], 'b': [5, 5, 5]}
var obj2 = {'a': [1, 1, 1], 'b': [2, 2, 2]}

const subtractArrays = (arr1,arr2) => arr1.map((val,idx) => val-arr2[idx]);

const result = Object.keys(obj1).reduce((out,key) => {
    out[key] = subtractArrays(obj1[key], obj2[key]);
    return out;
  }, {});
  
console.log(result);

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