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I am getting the compiler error C2259 when instantiating a class that inherits from other classes, which having abstract methods.

The inheritance scheme is a little bit weird and opaque but I need to do it in this way due to some restrictions of the problem.

The inheritance scheme is as follow:

class A
{
public:
    enum Animal { CAT, DOG };
    enum Color { RED, GREEN };
    enum Food { MEAT, FISH };

protected:
    virtual Animal animal() const = 0;
    virtual Color color() const = 0;
    virtual Food food() const = 0;
};

class B: public A
{
Animal animal() const { return CAT; }
};

class C: public A
{
Color color() const { return GREEN; }
};

class D: public A
{
Food food() const { return FISH; }
};

And then I declare a class with multiple inheritance like this:

class E : public B, public C, public D
{
};

Here, when I try to instantiate the class E I am getting the compiler error C2259:

error C2259: 'E': cannot instantiate abstract class
note: due to following members:
note: 'A::Color A::color(void) const': is abstract
note: see declaration of 'A::color'
note: 'A::Food A::food(void) const': is abstract
note: see declaration of 'A::food'
note: 'A::Animal A::animal(void) const': is abstract
note: see declaration of 'A::animal'

What I am doing wrong?

Thank you very much

Javier

  • 1
  • Also where is the virtual destructor? – Matthieu Brucher Mar 20 at 16:57
  • 2
    The only purpose all those ... serve is to prevent people from copy-pasting and compiling your code. E has 3 distinct copies of A, none of which implement all the pure virtual functions. You want to use virtual inheritance instead. – Praetorian Mar 20 at 16:57
  • 1
    It's not the subclasses that need to have the virtual destructor, it's the original parent class A. – Matthieu Brucher Mar 20 at 16:59
  • 2
    The request isn't to paste all the code, it's to paste compilable code sufficient to reproduce the problem. Making people edit your code before they can test something is just increasing the effort required to help.0 – Useless Mar 20 at 17:07
5

You have 3 different A objects inside E, you forgot to tag the inheritance as virtual so that the same A object is used:

class A
{
public:
    enum Animal { CAT, DOG };
    enum Color { RED, GREEN };
    enum Food { MEAT, FISH };

    virtual ~A(){}

protected:
    virtual Animal animal() const = 0;
    virtual Color color() const = 0;
    virtual Food food() const = 0;
};

class B: public virtual A
{
Animal animal() const override { return CAT; }
};

class C: public virtual A
{
Color color() const override { return GREEN; }
};

class D: public virtual A
{
Food food() const override { return FISH; }
};

class E : public B, public C, public D
{
};

int main()
{
    E e;
}
  • You are a god! Thank you very much!! – Javier Mar 20 at 17:05
  • I wouldn't go that far :p – Matthieu Brucher Mar 20 at 17:07
  • 1
    FWIW, this is the canonical example of virtual inheritance - and is also often thought to suggest a bad initial design. It's certainly a code smell. If you need this design though, this is the way to do it. – Useless Mar 20 at 17:09
  • Matthieu, one thing I learned from living through the 80s was when someone asks if you are a god, you say yes. I think this case is a close duplicate. – user4581301 Mar 20 at 17:27

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