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I am trying to generate polynomial features without sklearn. Given a numpy array and degree, I need to generate all the polynomial features in order. Example:

Input [a, b] with the degree-2 polynomial features are [a, b, a^2, ab, b^2]

Below is a partial solution I have come up with. The problem I have is multiplying a and b for any degree, and it is not in order.

def polynomialFeatures(X, degree = 1): 
features = []
while (degree > 0):
    for i in X:
        features.append(i ** degree)
    degree = degree - 1
features.append(X[0] * X[1])
return features

I have also tried using itertools.combinations_with_replacement, but this didn't solve the problem with multiplying a and b. Any suggestions?

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Here is what I came up with:

import numpy as np

def polynomialFeatures( X, degree = 2, interaction_only = False, include_bias = True ) :
    features = X.copy()
    prev_chunk = X
    indices = list( range( len( X ) ) )

    for d in range( 1, degree ) :
        # Create a new chunk of features for the degree d:
        new_chunk = []
        # Multiply each component with the products from the previous lower degree:
        for i, v in enumerate( X[:-d] if interaction_only else X ) :
            # Store the index where to start multiplying with the current component
            # at the next degree up:
            next_index = len( new_chunk )
            for coef in prev_chunk[indices[i+( 1 if interaction_only else 0 )]:] :
                new_chunk.append( v*coef )
            indices[i] = next_index
        # Extend the feature vector with the new chunk of features from the degree d:
        features = np.append( features, new_chunk )
        prev_chunk = new_chunk

    if include_bias :
        features = np.insert( features, 0, 1 )

    return features

It works with either X as a list or a single dimension array (to process one sample at a time, then). I leave it to you the joy to adapt the function for the processing of two dimensional arrays (multiple samples at once) if you need it!

I have tested in all possible cases and it exactly matches the output of sklearn.preprocessing.PolynomialFeatures

To see the corresponding output products, you can change the line new_chunk.append( v*coef ) by new_chunk.append( v + coef ) in the function and input a list of characters, like:

polynomialFeatures( [ 'a', 'b', 'c' ], 3, True, True )

Which will output for example:

['1' 'a' 'b' 'c' 'ab' 'ac' 'bc' 'abc']

Bonus ("il y en a un peu plus, je vous le mets quand même ?"):

For those who would eventually need it, I have translated the previous code in C++11:

template <class T>
std::vector<T> polynomialFeatures( const std::vector<T>& input, unsigned int degree, bool interaction_only, bool include_bias )
{
    std::vector<T> features = input;
    std::vector<T> prev_chunk = input;
    std::vector<size_t> indices( input.size() );
    std::iota( indices.begin(), indices.end(), 0 );

    for ( int d = 1 ; d < degree ; ++d )
    {
        // Create a new chunk of features for the degree d:
        std::vector<T> new_chunk;
        // Multiply each component with the products from the previous lower degree:
        for ( size_t i = 0 ; i < input.size() - ( interaction_only ? d : 0 ) ; ++i )
        {
            // Store the index where to start multiplying with the current component at the next degree up:
            size_t next_index = new_chunk.size();
            for ( auto coef_it = prev_chunk.begin() + indices[i + ( interaction_only ? 1 : 0 )] ; coef_it != prev_chunk.end() ; ++coef_it )
            {
                new_chunk.push_back( input[i]**coef_it );
            }
            indices[i] = next_index;
        }
        // Extend the feature vector with the new chunk of features:
        features.reserve( features.size() + std::distance( new_chunk.begin(), new_chunk.end() ) );
        features.insert( features.end(), new_chunk.begin(), new_chunk.end() );

        prev_chunk = new_chunk;
    }
    if ( include_bias )
        features.insert( features.begin(), 1 );

    return features;
}

It is fully compatible with sklearn.preprocessing.PolynomialFeatures output, so you can train your weights with Scikit-learn and then import them in your C++ program to make predictions for example.

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