186

I've recently become interested in algorithms and have begun exploring them by writing a naive implementation and then optimizing it in various ways.

I'm already familiar with the standard Python module for profiling runtime (for most things I've found the timeit magic function in IPython to be sufficient), but I'm also interested in memory usage so I can explore those tradeoffs as well (e.g. the cost of caching a table of previously computed values versus recomputing them as needed). Is there a module that will profile the memory usage of a given function for me?

106

This one has been answered already here: Python memory profiler

Basically you do something like that (cited from Guppy-PE):

>>> from guppy import hpy; h=hpy()
>>> h.heap()
Partition of a set of 48477 objects. Total size = 3265516 bytes.
 Index  Count   %     Size   % Cumulative  % Kind (class / dict of class)
     0  25773  53  1612820  49   1612820  49 str
     1  11699  24   483960  15   2096780  64 tuple
     2    174   0   241584   7   2338364  72 dict of module
     3   3478   7   222592   7   2560956  78 types.CodeType
     4   3296   7   184576   6   2745532  84 function
     5    401   1   175112   5   2920644  89 dict of class
     6    108   0    81888   3   3002532  92 dict (no owner)
     7    114   0    79632   2   3082164  94 dict of type
     8    117   0    51336   2   3133500  96 type
     9    667   1    24012   1   3157512  97 __builtin__.wrapper_descriptor
<76 more rows. Type e.g. '_.more' to view.>
>>> h.iso(1,[],{})
Partition of a set of 3 objects. Total size = 176 bytes.
 Index  Count   %     Size   % Cumulative  % Kind (class / dict of class)
     0      1  33      136  77       136  77 dict (no owner)
     1      1  33       28  16       164  93 list
     2      1  33       12   7       176 100 int
>>> x=[]
>>> h.iso(x).sp
 0: h.Root.i0_modules['__main__'].__dict__['x']
>>> 
  • 5
    Official guppy documentation is a bit minimial; for other resources see this example and the heapy essay. – tutuDajuju Jul 1 '15 at 18:30
  • 11
    Guppy only works for python2 – Baschdl Jul 25 '18 at 20:36
  • 5
    Guppy seems to be no longer maintained, so I suggest this answer be downgraded and one of the other answers accepted instead. – robguinness Nov 14 '18 at 8:43
62

Python 3.4 includes a new module: tracemalloc. It provides detailed statistics about which code is allocating the most memory. Here's an example that displays the top three lines allocating memory.

from collections import Counter
import linecache
import os
import tracemalloc

def display_top(snapshot, key_type='lineno', limit=3):
    snapshot = snapshot.filter_traces((
        tracemalloc.Filter(False, "<frozen importlib._bootstrap>"),
        tracemalloc.Filter(False, "<unknown>"),
    ))
    top_stats = snapshot.statistics(key_type)

    print("Top %s lines" % limit)
    for index, stat in enumerate(top_stats[:limit], 1):
        frame = stat.traceback[0]
        # replace "/path/to/module/file.py" with "module/file.py"
        filename = os.sep.join(frame.filename.split(os.sep)[-2:])
        print("#%s: %s:%s: %.1f KiB"
              % (index, filename, frame.lineno, stat.size / 1024))
        line = linecache.getline(frame.filename, frame.lineno).strip()
        if line:
            print('    %s' % line)

    other = top_stats[limit:]
    if other:
        size = sum(stat.size for stat in other)
        print("%s other: %.1f KiB" % (len(other), size / 1024))
    total = sum(stat.size for stat in top_stats)
    print("Total allocated size: %.1f KiB" % (total / 1024))


tracemalloc.start()

counts = Counter()
fname = '/usr/share/dict/american-english'
with open(fname) as words:
    words = list(words)
    for word in words:
        prefix = word[:3]
        counts[prefix] += 1
print('Top prefixes:', counts.most_common(3))

snapshot = tracemalloc.take_snapshot()
display_top(snapshot)

And here are the results:

Top prefixes: [('con', 1220), ('dis', 1002), ('pro', 809)]
Top 3 lines
#1: scratches/memory_test.py:37: 6527.1 KiB
    words = list(words)
#2: scratches/memory_test.py:39: 247.7 KiB
    prefix = word[:3]
#3: scratches/memory_test.py:40: 193.0 KiB
    counts[prefix] += 1
4 other: 4.3 KiB
Total allocated size: 6972.1 KiB

When is a memory leak not a leak?

That example is great when the memory is still being held at the end of the calculation, but sometimes you have code that allocates a lot of memory and then releases it all. It's not technically a memory leak, but it's using more memory than you think it should. How can you track memory usage when it all gets released? If it's your code, you can probably add some debugging code to take snapshots while it's running. If not, you can start a background thread to monitor memory usage while the main thread runs.

Here's the previous example where the code has all been moved into the count_prefixes() function. When that function returns, all the memory is released. I also added some sleep() calls to simulate a long-running calculation.

from collections import Counter
import linecache
import os
import tracemalloc
from time import sleep


def count_prefixes():
    sleep(2)  # Start up time.
    counts = Counter()
    fname = '/usr/share/dict/american-english'
    with open(fname) as words:
        words = list(words)
        for word in words:
            prefix = word[:3]
            counts[prefix] += 1
            sleep(0.0001)
    most_common = counts.most_common(3)
    sleep(3)  # Shut down time.
    return most_common


def main():
    tracemalloc.start()

    most_common = count_prefixes()
    print('Top prefixes:', most_common)

    snapshot = tracemalloc.take_snapshot()
    display_top(snapshot)


def display_top(snapshot, key_type='lineno', limit=3):
    snapshot = snapshot.filter_traces((
        tracemalloc.Filter(False, "<frozen importlib._bootstrap>"),
        tracemalloc.Filter(False, "<unknown>"),
    ))
    top_stats = snapshot.statistics(key_type)

    print("Top %s lines" % limit)
    for index, stat in enumerate(top_stats[:limit], 1):
        frame = stat.traceback[0]
        # replace "/path/to/module/file.py" with "module/file.py"
        filename = os.sep.join(frame.filename.split(os.sep)[-2:])
        print("#%s: %s:%s: %.1f KiB"
              % (index, filename, frame.lineno, stat.size / 1024))
        line = linecache.getline(frame.filename, frame.lineno).strip()
        if line:
            print('    %s' % line)

    other = top_stats[limit:]
    if other:
        size = sum(stat.size for stat in other)
        print("%s other: %.1f KiB" % (len(other), size / 1024))
    total = sum(stat.size for stat in top_stats)
    print("Total allocated size: %.1f KiB" % (total / 1024))


main()

When I run that version, the memory usage has gone from 6MB down to 4KB, because the function released all its memory when it finished.

Top prefixes: [('con', 1220), ('dis', 1002), ('pro', 809)]
Top 3 lines
#1: collections/__init__.py:537: 0.7 KiB
    self.update(*args, **kwds)
#2: collections/__init__.py:555: 0.6 KiB
    return _heapq.nlargest(n, self.items(), key=_itemgetter(1))
#3: python3.6/heapq.py:569: 0.5 KiB
    result = [(key(elem), i, elem) for i, elem in zip(range(0, -n, -1), it)]
10 other: 2.2 KiB
Total allocated size: 4.0 KiB

Now here's a version inspired by another answer that starts a second thread to monitor memory usage.

from collections import Counter
import linecache
import os
import tracemalloc
from datetime import datetime
from queue import Queue, Empty
from resource import getrusage, RUSAGE_SELF
from threading import Thread
from time import sleep

def memory_monitor(command_queue: Queue, poll_interval=1):
    tracemalloc.start()
    old_max = 0
    snapshot = None
    while True:
        try:
            command_queue.get(timeout=poll_interval)
            if snapshot is not None:
                print(datetime.now())
                display_top(snapshot)

            return
        except Empty:
            max_rss = getrusage(RUSAGE_SELF).ru_maxrss
            if max_rss > old_max:
                old_max = max_rss
                snapshot = tracemalloc.take_snapshot()
                print(datetime.now(), 'max RSS', max_rss)


def count_prefixes():
    sleep(2)  # Start up time.
    counts = Counter()
    fname = '/usr/share/dict/american-english'
    with open(fname) as words:
        words = list(words)
        for word in words:
            prefix = word[:3]
            counts[prefix] += 1
            sleep(0.0001)
    most_common = counts.most_common(3)
    sleep(3)  # Shut down time.
    return most_common


def main():
    queue = Queue()
    poll_interval = 0.1
    monitor_thread = Thread(target=memory_monitor, args=(queue, poll_interval))
    monitor_thread.start()
    try:
        most_common = count_prefixes()
        print('Top prefixes:', most_common)
    finally:
        queue.put('stop')
        monitor_thread.join()


def display_top(snapshot, key_type='lineno', limit=3):
    snapshot = snapshot.filter_traces((
        tracemalloc.Filter(False, "<frozen importlib._bootstrap>"),
        tracemalloc.Filter(False, "<unknown>"),
    ))
    top_stats = snapshot.statistics(key_type)

    print("Top %s lines" % limit)
    for index, stat in enumerate(top_stats[:limit], 1):
        frame = stat.traceback[0]
        # replace "/path/to/module/file.py" with "module/file.py"
        filename = os.sep.join(frame.filename.split(os.sep)[-2:])
        print("#%s: %s:%s: %.1f KiB"
              % (index, filename, frame.lineno, stat.size / 1024))
        line = linecache.getline(frame.filename, frame.lineno).strip()
        if line:
            print('    %s' % line)

    other = top_stats[limit:]
    if other:
        size = sum(stat.size for stat in other)
        print("%s other: %.1f KiB" % (len(other), size / 1024))
    total = sum(stat.size for stat in top_stats)
    print("Total allocated size: %.1f KiB" % (total / 1024))


main()

The resource module lets you check the current memory usage, and save the snapshot from the peak memory usage. The queue lets the main thread tell the memory monitor thread when to print its report and shut down. When it runs, it shows the memory being used by the list() call:

2018-05-29 10:34:34.441334 max RSS 10188
2018-05-29 10:34:36.475707 max RSS 23588
2018-05-29 10:34:36.616524 max RSS 38104
2018-05-29 10:34:36.772978 max RSS 45924
2018-05-29 10:34:36.929688 max RSS 46824
2018-05-29 10:34:37.087554 max RSS 46852
Top prefixes: [('con', 1220), ('dis', 1002), ('pro', 809)]
2018-05-29 10:34:56.281262
Top 3 lines
#1: scratches/scratch.py:36: 6527.0 KiB
    words = list(words)
#2: scratches/scratch.py:38: 16.4 KiB
    prefix = word[:3]
#3: scratches/scratch.py:39: 10.1 KiB
    counts[prefix] += 1
19 other: 10.8 KiB
Total allocated size: 6564.3 KiB

If you're on Linux, you may find /proc/self/statm more useful than the resource module.

  • This is great, but it seems to only print the snapshots during intervals when functions inside "count_prefixes()" return. In other words, if you have some long running call, e.g. long_running() inside the count_prefixes() function, the max RSS values will not be printed until long_running() returns. Or am I mistaken? – robguinness Nov 14 '18 at 9:12
  • I think you're mistaken, @robguinness. memory_monitor() is running on a separate thread from count_prefixes(), so the only ways that one can affect the other are the GIL and the message queue that I pass to memory_monitor(). I suspect that when count_prefixes() calls sleep(), it encourages the thread context to switch. If your long_running() isn't actually taking very long, then the thread context might not switch until you hit the sleep() call back in count_prefixes(). If that doesn't make sense, post a new question and link to it from here. – Don Kirkby Nov 14 '18 at 17:31
  • Thanks. I will post a new question and add a link here. (I need to work up an example of the issue I am having, since I can't share the proprietary parts of the code.) – robguinness Nov 15 '18 at 8:04
22

If you only want to look at the memory usage of an object, (answer to other question)

There is a module called Pympler which contains the asizeof module.

Use as follows:

from pympler import asizeof
asizeof.asizeof(my_object)

Unlike sys.getsizeof, it works for your self-created objects.

>>> asizeof.asizeof(tuple('bcd'))
200
>>> asizeof.asizeof({'foo': 'bar', 'baz': 'bar'})
400
>>> asizeof.asizeof({})
280
>>> asizeof.asizeof({'foo':'bar'})
360
>>> asizeof.asizeof('foo')
40
>>> asizeof.asizeof(Bar())
352
>>> asizeof.asizeof(Bar().__dict__)
280
>>> help(asizeof.asizeof)
Help on function asizeof in module pympler.asizeof:

asizeof(*objs, **opts)
    Return the combined size in bytes of all objects passed as positional arguments.
  • 1
    Is this asizeof related to RSS? – pg2455 Feb 14 '18 at 12:11
  • 2
    @mousecoder: yes, it's in bytes. See amendment – serv-inc Feb 14 '18 at 21:47
  • 1
    @mousecoder: Which RSS at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSS_(disambiguation)? Web feeds? How? – serv-inc Feb 14 '18 at 21:49
  • 2
    @serv-inc Resident set size, though I can only find one mention of it in Pympler's source and that mention doesn't seem directly tied to asizeof – jkmartindale Aug 7 '18 at 14:43
  • 1
    @mousecoder the memory reported by asizeof can contribute to RSS, yes. I'm not sure what else you mean by "related to". – OrangeDog Oct 2 '18 at 13:11
21

For a really simple approach try:

import resource
def using(point=""):
    usage=resource.getrusage(resource.RUSAGE_SELF)
    return '''%s: usertime=%s systime=%s mem=%s mb
           '''%(point,usage[0],usage[1],
                (usage[2]*resource.getpagesize())/1000000.0 )

Just insert using("Label") where you want to see what's going on.

  • 6
    "memory usage of a given function" so your approach is not helping. – Glaslos Apr 12 '13 at 11:23
  • By looking at usage[2] you are looking at ru_maxrss, which is only the portion of the process which is resident. This won't help much if the process has been swapped to disk, even partially. – Louis Oct 12 '15 at 18:09
  • 6
    resource is a Unix specific module that does not work under Windows. – Martin Nov 16 '16 at 11:16
  • The units of ru_maxrss (that is, usage[2]) are kB, not pages so there is no need to multiply that number by resource.getpagesize(). – Tey' Mar 3 '18 at 22:46
  • This printed out nothing for me. – quantumpotato May 12 '18 at 17:28
5

Since the accepted answer and also the next highest voted answer have, in my opinion, some problems, I'd like to offer one more answer that is based closely on Ihor B.'s answer with some small but important modifications.

This solution allows you to run profiling on either by wrapping a function call with the profile function and calling it, or by decorating your function/method with the @profile decorator.

The first technique is useful when you want to profile some third-party code without messing with its source, whereas the second technique is a bit "cleaner" and works better when you are don't mind modifying the source of the function/method you want to profile.

I've also modified the output, so that you get RSS, VMS, and shared memory. I don't care much about the "before" and "after" values, but only the delta, so I removed those (if you're comparing to Ihor B.'s answer).

Profiling code

# profile.py
import time
import os
import psutil
import inspect


def elapsed_since(start):
    #return time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.gmtime(time.time() - start))
    elapsed = time.time() - start
    if elapsed < 1:
        return str(round(elapsed*1000,2)) + "ms"
    if elapsed < 60:
        return str(round(elapsed, 2)) + "s"
    if elapsed < 3600:
        return str(round(elapsed/60, 2)) + "min"
    else:
        return str(round(elapsed / 3600, 2)) + "hrs"


def get_process_memory():
    process = psutil.Process(os.getpid())
    mi = process.memory_info()
    return mi.rss, mi.vms, mi.shared


def format_bytes(bytes):
    if abs(bytes) < 1000:
        return str(bytes)+"B"
    elif abs(bytes) < 1e6:
        return str(round(bytes/1e3,2)) + "kB"
    elif abs(bytes) < 1e9:
        return str(round(bytes / 1e6, 2)) + "MB"
    else:
        return str(round(bytes / 1e9, 2)) + "GB"


def profile(func, *args, **kwargs):
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        rss_before, vms_before, shared_before = get_process_memory()
        start = time.time()
        result = func(*args, **kwargs)
        elapsed_time = elapsed_since(start)
        rss_after, vms_after, shared_after = get_process_memory()
        print("Profiling: {:>20}  RSS: {:>8} | VMS: {:>8} | SHR {"
              ":>8} | time: {:>8}"
            .format("<" + func.__name__ + ">",
                    format_bytes(rss_after - rss_before),
                    format_bytes(vms_after - vms_before),
                    format_bytes(shared_after - shared_before),
                    elapsed_time))
        return result
    if inspect.isfunction(func):
        return wrapper
    elif inspect.ismethod(func):
        return wrapper(*args,**kwargs)

Example usage, assuming the above code is saved as profile.py:

from profile import profile
from time import sleep
from sklearn import datasets # Just an example of 3rd party function call


# Method 1
run_profiling = profile(datasets.load_digits)
data = run_profiling()

# Method 2
@profile
def my_function():
    # do some stuff
    a_list = []
    for i in range(1,100000):
        a_list.append(i)
    return a_list


res = my_function()

This should result in output similar to the below:

Profiling:        <load_digits>  RSS:   5.07MB | VMS:   4.91MB | SHR  73.73kB | time:  89.99ms
Profiling:        <my_function>  RSS:   1.06MB | VMS:   1.35MB | SHR       0B | time:   8.43ms

A couple of important final notes:

  1. Keep in mind, this method of profiling is only going to be approximate, since lots of other stuff might be happening on the machine. Due to garbage collection and other factors, the deltas might even be zero.
  2. For some unknown reason, very short function calls (e.g. 1 or 2 ms) show up with zero memory usage. I suspect this is some limitation of the hardware/OS (tested on basic laptop with Linux) on how often memory statistics are updated.
  3. To keep the examples simple, I didn't use any function arguments, but they should work as one would expect, i.e. profile(my_function, arg) to profile my_function(arg)
4

maybe it help:
<see additional>

pip install gprof2dot
sudo apt-get install graphviz

gprof2dot -f pstats profile_for_func1_001 | dot -Tpng -o profile.png

def profileit(name):
    """
    @profileit("profile_for_func1_001")
    """
    def inner(func):
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            prof = cProfile.Profile()
            retval = prof.runcall(func, *args, **kwargs)
            # Note use of name from outer scope
            prof.dump_stats(name)
            return retval
        return wrapper
    return inner

@profileit("profile_for_func1_001")
def func1(...)
3

Below is a simple function decorator which allows to track how much memory the process consumed before the function call, after the function call, and what is the difference:

import time
import os
import psutil


def elapsed_since(start):
    return time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.gmtime(time.time() - start))


def get_process_memory():
    process = psutil.Process(os.getpid())
    return process.get_memory_info().rss


def profile(func):
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        mem_before = get_process_memory()
        start = time.time()
        result = func(*args, **kwargs)
        elapsed_time = elapsed_since(start)
        mem_after = get_process_memory()
        print("{}: memory before: {:,}, after: {:,}, consumed: {:,}; exec time: {}".format(
            func.__name__,
            mem_before, mem_after, mem_after - mem_before,
            elapsed_time))
        return result
    return wrapper

Here is my blog which describes all the details. (archived link)

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