-1

I have JSON: JSON Link

Now I need to create parent child relationship. So that I can consume data:

HTTP GET /:tree_id
=> Return the saved structure
HTTP GET /:tree_id/parent/:id
=> Return the list of parents
HTTP GET /:tree_id/child/:id
=> Return the list of childs

I have Couple gems eg. acts_as_tree & ancestry But all the above gems are providing me use parent.children to get the data.

But I nee to consume above API. Can you please help how i should use association and model structure to save and get the data based on above REST request.

closed as off-topic by Aleksei Matiushkin, max pleaner, jvillian, anothermh, Modus Tollens Mar 21 at 23:31

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Reproducible Example." – anothermh, Modus Tollens
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • What exactly do you mean "I need to create parent child relationship"? What is the output you are trying to create? – jvillian Mar 21 at 6:26
  • HTTP GET /:tree_id/parent/:id, If someone hits this url it, It will return the list of parents IDs Or HTTP GET /:tree_id/child/:id => Return the list of childs – John Ross Mar 21 at 6:30
  • It can be a search function to find Child/Parent nodes – John Ross Mar 21 at 6:33
  • 1
    Please do not link to external sites that host your code. If you have code that is relevant to your question then you must include it directly in your question. – anothermh Mar 21 at 6:34
  • 3
    I can’t visit pastebin from here so I can’t see your example. If you think it’s “completely fine” to leave out the only meaningful and relevant code that would enable me or anyone else to answer your question then I’m not sure why you’d take the time to ask one at all. SO gives you the tools you need to include it in your post; why would you go out of your way to make it harder for people to help you? What benefit do you get from using an external site that beats the drawback of people being unable to see your code and being unable to answer your question? – anothermh Mar 21 at 23:30
2

How about you create a module like:

module Ancestry

  def self.extended(receiver)
    receiver.class_eval do 

      define_method(:children_ids) do |children_ary=[]|
        receiver[:child].each_with_object(children_ary) do |child, children_ary|
          children_ary << child[:id]
          child.extend(Ancestry).children_ids(children_ary)
        end if receiver[:child].any?
      end

      define_method(:parent_ids) do |parents_ary=[]|
        if receiver[:child].any?
          parents_ary << receiver[:id]
          receiver[:child].each_with_object(parents_ary) do |child, parents_ary|
            child.extend(Ancestry).parent_ids(parents_ary)
          end
        end
      end

      define_method(:node) do |node_id|
        return receiver if receiver[:id] == node_id
        receiver[:child].each do |child|
          child.extend(Ancestry).node(node_id).tap do |x| 
            return x unless x.blank?
          end
        end if receiver[:child]
        {}.extend(Ancestry)
      end

      define_method(:child) do 
        receiver[:child] || []
      end

    end
  end

end

Then extend your hash like this:

data = {
  "id": 1,
  "child": [
    {
      "id": 1847,
      "child": [
        {
          "id": 8078,
          "child": []
        },
        {
          "id": 3380,
          "child": [
            {
              "id": 561,
              "child": []
            },
            {
              "id": 706,
              "child": []
            }
          ]
        }
      ]
    }
  ]
}.with_indifferent_access.extend(Ancestry)

Now you can do:

data.children_ids
 => [1847, 8078, 3380, 561, 706]
data.parent_ids
 => [1, 1847, 3380]
data.node(1847).node(3380).child
 => [{"id"=>561, "child"=>[]}, {"id"=>706, "child"=>[]}]
data.node(9999).node(3380).child
 => []
data.node(1847).node(9999).child
 => []
data.node(1847).node(3380).node(561).child
 => []
  • Thanks for this. But Can you please tell me if someone hitting /:tree_id/child/:id, How it works – John Ross Mar 21 at 8:59
  • I don't know what the :tree_id and :id are for in /:tree_id/child/:id. If someone visits /4/child/3, what do expect they will receive? – jvillian Mar 21 at 14:43
  • /1847/child/3380 => "child": [ { "id": 561, "child": [] }, { "id": 706, "child": [] } ] – John Ross Mar 22 at 5:35
  • Thanks for helping till now, an upvote from side. – John Ross Mar 22 at 6:38
  • Oooooooh. That's something entirely (or at least somewhat) different. That's why I originally asked you what output you were looking for. You should really update your question so it is clearer. Anyway, I updated my answer. – jvillian Mar 22 at 7:35

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.