1

I wish to convert all the lowercase letters of a user given string to '#'. But upon running the code, only the last lowercase char is getting converted. Could someone suggest a solution to this ? (I am new in java)

import java.util.Scanner;

class replaceEx{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner s=new Scanner(System.in);
        String s1,s2=null;
        s1=s.nextLine();
        for(int i=0;i<s1.length();i++)
        {
            if(s1.charAt(i)>='a' && s1.charAt(i)<='z')
            s2=s1.replace(s1.charAt(i),'#');
        }
        System.out.println(s2);
    }
}

Input : ABCDabcd

Output: ABCDabc#

  • @Jocke that is not what he is asking about, and doesn't cause an issue here. – GhostCat Mar 21 at 9:37
  • @GhostCat , actually Jocke simply points what the problem is. OP thinks that s1.replace() would change the s1. that's why Jocke pointed it out. – hunter Mar 21 at 9:42
  • @hunter That is not correct. The OP assigns and prints to s2, not s1. See my answer for a better explanation of what is going on here! – GhostCat Mar 21 at 9:44
5

Here:

s2=s1.replace(s1.charAt(i),'#');

What happens is: s2 becomes s1, where that char at i gets replaced with '#'.

You assume that somehow s2 remembers previous assignments. It doesn't.

In other words: your code does call:

s2=s1.replace('a','#');
s2=s1.replace('b','#');
s2=s1.replace('c','#');
s2=s1.replace('d','#');

So, s2 becomes assigned ABCD#bcd, ABCDa#cd, ABCDab#d, ABCDabc#. And as said: only that last assignment sticks. Worse: replace() doesn't care about that index i that you used for charAt(). It simply replaces the first occurrence of the char to look for. In other words: if your word is "Aaba", you always keep replacing only that first 'a' with #.

In other words: your whole approach can't work, for multiple reasons.

There are multiple ways to solve this, for example to use replaceAll(). That method also allows to use regular expressions, so that you can say (in one call) "replace all lowercase chars with #" easily.

Another approach would be:

  • create a StringBuilder sb
  • iterate your s1 string
  • if a char is a lowercase letter: append # to sb
  • otherwise append the char
  • in the end, turn sb into a real string
  • Changed the line from s2=s1.replace(s1.charAt(i),'#'); to s2=s1.replaceAll("[a-z]", "#"); and it worked correctly. Thanks a lot – Debmalya Panday Mar 21 at 9:54
  • @DebmalyaPanday You are very welcome! – GhostCat Mar 21 at 10:11
0

@GhostCat answer is great and strait to point and I wanted to show an example he pointed out by using Java streams feature. Take a look at it:

    String simpleText = "What is a weather like? Day is beitufil.";
    // int 32 is equal to empty space character ' '
    String processedText  = simpleText.chars().mapToObj(i -> i != 32 ? '#' : (char)i).collect(StringBuilder::new, (text, character) -> text.append((char)character), StringBuilder::append).toString();
    System.out.println(processedText);
  • 1
    You can compare i directly with ' ' instead of the cryptic 32. – DodgyCodeException Mar 21 at 11:30
  • Thanks for comment. Sure, I have made it that way first time( and edited ), but then I didn't want to confuse him, since chars() gets us a stream of integers. @DodgyCodeException – MS90 Mar 21 at 11:34
0
import java.util.Scanner;
//class name should be start with capital letter in java
class ReplaceEx{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
     Scanner s=new Scanner(System.in);
     String s1,s2=null;
     s1=s.nextLine();
     //Changed below line from s2=s1.replace(s1.charAt(i),'#') to
     s2=s1.replaceAll("[a-z]", "#");
     System.out.println(s2);
   }
}
  • 1
    Just one s1.replaceAll is enough. No need to put it in a loop. – DodgyCodeException Mar 21 at 11:32
  • @DodgyCodeException Thanks for the information – Jijo Daniel Mar 21 at 11:43

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