18
error: use of deleted function 'A::A(const A&)'
 return tmp;
        ^~~

Why is the copy constructor called only when there is a virtual destructor in A? How to avoid this?

struct B {};

struct A{
    std::unique_ptr<B> x;
    virtual ~A() = default;
};

A f() {
    A tmp;
    return tmp;
}
  • 1
  • 5
    C++ handles objects different than C#/Java. When an instance goes out of scope (tmp here) its destructor must be called. Therefore, when you return tmp then you're asking it to make a copy of tmp to be return to whomever calls the function. Once copied, tmp will be destroyed and its copy will be available for use. – Everyone Mar 21 at 20:29
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    @Everyone except that it is usually a move rather than a copy, which is what the question is about. – Quentin Mar 22 at 9:24
  • A little surprising as I would have thought that RVO would have been invoked, resulting in no move or copy. – Adrian Apr 1 at 19:53
30

virtual ~A() = default; is a user declared destructor. Because of that, A no longer has a move constructor. That means return tmp; can't move tmp and since tmp is not copyable, you get a compiler error.

There are two ways you can fix this. You can add a move constructor like

struct A{
    std::unique_ptr<B> x;

    A() = default; // you have to add this since the move constructor was added
    A(A&&) = default; // defaulted move
    virtual ~A() = default;
};

or you can create a base class that has the virtual destructor and inherit from that like

struct C {
    virtual ~C() = default;
};

struct A : C {
    std::unique_ptr<B> x;
};

This works because A no longer has a user declared destructor (Yes, C does but we only care about A) so it will still generate a move constructor in A. The important part of this is that C doesn't have a deleted move constructor, it just doesn't have one period, so trying to move it will cause a copy. That means C's copy constructor is called in A's implicitly generated move constructor since C(std::move(A_obj_to_move_from)) will copy as long as it doesn't have a deleted move constructor.

  • 11
    Better to follow the Rule of Zero/Five. Either add all of (copy ctor, move ctor, copy assignment, move assignment, destructor) or add none of them. In this example, none of them are necessary. – 0x5453 Mar 21 at 20:33
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    @0x5453 Unless this is a parent class and the OP wants the derived classes to get destroyed properly. You need a virtual destructor if you have polymorphism. – NathanOliver Mar 21 at 20:34
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    @Tzalumen no delete is required (because that's what the unique pointer does for you), but a virtual destructor is required so that the unique pointer won't have UB. – eerorika Mar 21 at 20:40
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    @Tzalumen If you delete an object of class X through a pointer to a base class of X and that base class doesn't have a virtual dtor, it's Undefined Behaviour. Regardless of what the destructor does. – Angew Mar 21 at 20:41
  • 3
    @Tzalumen If you have polymorphism, you must have a virtual destructor. If you don't the destructor for the derived class won't be called and you have UB. – NathanOliver Mar 21 at 20:41

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