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Suppose I want to make new string from a given string(as parametre to a function) and return the new string.

When the method is called in main, the new string is never made and I do not understand why.

Here is my code in the function outside main:

char* new_name(char* name)
{
  char* res = (char*)malloc(strlen("recv") + strlen(name));
  if(res == null)
  {
    return null;
  }

  else
  {
    memcpy(&res, "recv_", strlen("recv_"));
    strcat(res, name);
  }
    return res;
}

And in main I have:

char * result = new_name(name);

Where "name" is defined and given.

  • You should pass res as is, not its address. – machine_1 Mar 21 at 21:22
  • 1
    Are you mallocing enough space for your new string? It looks like it's too short. – Christian Gibbons Mar 21 at 21:24
1

in

  char* res = (char*)malloc(strlen("recv") + strlen(name));

you need to allocate for "recv_" rather than "recv" because of the code after, and to allocate 1 more to have place for the terminating null char, so

char* res = (char*)malloc(strlen("recv_") + strlen(name) + 1);

In

 if(res == null)
 {
   return null;
 }

null must be NULL

In

memcpy(&res, "recv_", strlen("recv_"));

must be

memcpy(res, "recv_", strlen("recv_") + 1);

else you do not modify the allocated array but the stack from the address of the variable res, and you need to also place the terminating null char so I just add 1 to the number of char to copy

note is it more simple to use strcpy : strcpy(res, "recv_")


Example :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char* new_name(char* name)
{
  char* res = (char*)malloc(strlen("recv_") + strlen(name) + 1);

  if(res == NULL)
  {
    return NULL;
  }

  else
  {
    memcpy(res, "recv_", strlen("recv_") + 1); /* or strcpy(res, "recv_"); */
    strcat(res, name);
  }
  return res;
}

int main()
{

  char * result = new_name("foo");

  printf("'%s'\n", result);
  free(result);
  return 0;
}

Compilation and execution :

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ gcc -pedantic -Wall -Wextra m.c
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ ./a.out
'recv_foo'

Execution under valgrind :

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ valgrind ./a.out
==22335== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==22335== Copyright (C) 2002-2017, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==22335== Using Valgrind-3.13.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==22335== Command: ./a.out
==22335== 
'recv_foo'
==22335== 
==22335== HEAP SUMMARY:
==22335==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==22335==   total heap usage: 2 allocs, 2 frees, 1,033 bytes allocated
==22335== 
==22335== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==22335== 
==22335== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==22335== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 6 from 3)
  • Thank you very much! I was having trouble with the memcpy function. With strcpy it is much more better! – Xyz Mar 21 at 21:37
  • 1
    @Xyz yes, when you work on string it is better to use function for string rather than for 'memory' – bruno Mar 21 at 21:39
1

An alternative solution could read:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *new_name(char *name) {
    char const prefix[] = "recv_";
    // Figure out size needed
    int sz = snprintf(NULL, 0, "%s%s", prefix, name);
    sz++; // make room for '\0' at end
    char *res = malloc(sz);
    if (res == NULL) {
        return NULL;
    }
    (void) snprintf(res, sz, "%s%s", prefix, name);
    return res;
}

Or, to avoid counting the lenght of name more than once,

char* new_name(char* name)
{
  char const prefix[] = "recv_";
  size_t const pre_len = sizeof prefix - 1U;
  size_t const name_len = strlen(name) + 1U;
  char* res = (char*)malloc(pre_len + name_len);
  if(res)
  {
    memcpy(res, prefix, pre_len);
    memcpy(res + pre_len, name, name_len);
  }
  return res;
}

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