7

I'd like to append one vector (vectorAlpha) to the end of another vector (vectorBeta). There's two different approaches I could think of, and I'd like to know how to do each one.

The first approach was to append the second vector and remove all duplicate items from the new vector. The other approach is to leave duplicates in the individual vectors alone, but not adding any items from vectorBeta if they are already present in vectorALpha.

For instance if the vectors are vector with the following values:

vectorAlpha:

First line of alpha
An alpha line
An alpha line
Some line
Alpha fifth line

vectorBeta:

Beta first line
A beta line
A beta line
Some line
Beta fifth line

I think the first approach would result in the combined vector:

First line of alpha
An alpha line
Some line
Alpha fifth line
Beta first line
A beta line
Beta fifth line

While the second approach would just be both arrays combined, but with the 'Some line' from the second vector not added:

First line of alpha
An alpha line
An alpha line
Some line
Alpha fifth line
Beta first line
A beta line
A beta line
Beta fifth line

What would be the C++ code to use for these two appraoches?

3 Answers 3

6

Since it became clear that

  1. you only wanted duplicates remove entries from vecB if they existed in vecA, not duplicates in general
  2. you wanted to preserve the ordering

The answer should (obviously?) be std::remove_copy_if. Call it thusly:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

typedef std::vector<int> Vec;
struct Contained
{
    const Vec& _sequence;
    Contained(const Vec &vec) : _sequence(vec) {}
    bool operator()(int i) const 
    { 
        return _sequence.end() != std::find(_sequence.begin(), _sequence.end(), i);
    }
};

int main()
{
    Vec vecA;
    Vec vecB;

    std::remove_copy_if(vecB.begin(), vecB.end(), back_inserter(vecA), Contained(vecA));
}

You might want to optimize the predicate depending on the size and nature of vecA:

#include <set>

template <typename T>
struct Contained
{
    const std::set<T> _set;
    template <typename It> Contained(const It& begin, const It& end) : _set(begin, end) {}
    bool operator()(const T& i) const 
    { 
        return _set.end() != _set.find(i);
    }
};

Which would be used as Contained<int>(vecA.begin(), vecA.end()). The full code is compiling on codepad.org

Cheers

1
  • 1
    A very elegant solution to the problem!
    – swestrup
    Commented Apr 7, 2011 at 13:59
5

Update: new answer here due to changed/added requirements

typedef std::...<...> Vec;
Vec vecA;
Vec vecB;

// fill your data

// sort
std::sort(vecA.begin(), vecA.end());
std::sort(vecB.begin(), vecB.end());


// join
size_t mergesize = vecA.size();

std::copy(vecB.begin(), vecB.end(), std::back_inserter(vecA));

// merge
std::inplace_merge(vecA.begin(), vecA.begin()+mergesize, vecA.end());

You could combine the join+merge steps as follows

Vec vecC;
std::merge(vecA.begin(), vecA.end(),
            vecB.begin(), vecB.end(),
            std::back_insterter(vecC));

As a final step, remove the duplicates:

Vec::iterator pte = std::unique(vecC.begin(), vecC.end());
// dups now in [pte, vecC.end()), so optionally erase:
vecC.erase(pte, vecC.end());
5
  • 1
    Thanks. For the std::inplace_merge line, I am getting the error: "Expression: vector iterators incompatible"? And why is this line necessary if the std::copy...backinserter() line is already used? The vecC merge() only works if vecA and vecB are sorted, and I don't want them sorted, I want the order to be unchanged - with vecB simply appended. Also for the removal of duplicates, I'd like the option to not add items from the 2nd vector if already in the 1st, but leave any other duplicates alone (as in my example above - both vectors have duplicates).
    – Tristan
    Commented Apr 6, 2011 at 4:57
  • It does compile for me: see codepad. You need the sorting in order to remove duplicates by using unique. I recommend using std::set if the order is not of concern (will update answer). I'll address your amended question in a separate answer, later
    – sehe
    Commented Apr 6, 2011 at 7:42
  • I've answered your improved question in my new answer here
    – sehe
    Commented Apr 6, 2011 at 8:19
  • It compiles, but std::copy invalidates the mergepoint iterator. When running the first code piece, I get an assertion failure with the message "vector iterators in range are from different containers" I suspect this is from either the vector being enlarged during copy (though I'm trying to prevent this with a reserve before), or from the mergepoint iterator not pointing to a position before the inserted elements, but insted to the place where elements are inserted. The workaround I use is storing the vector size before the copy, then using vecA.begin()+sizeBefore instead of mergepoint
    – codeling
    Commented Mar 8, 2022 at 13:07
  • fixed the problem mentioned in my previous comment in the answer. regarding iterator invalidation, see also en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container#Iterator_invalidation
    – codeling
    Commented Mar 8, 2022 at 13:15
3

Is the order of the elements in the two vectors important? If not, then you should probably be using sets instead.

1
  • Yes, the order is important. I'd like the elements to remain in the order they were in originally. Also I think sets don't allow any duplicates, and I do want the option to keep duplicates.
    – Tristan
    Commented Apr 6, 2011 at 4:29

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