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i cant see why i'm getting segmentation fault from this code and somehow when i use arrays instead of pointers it works, i would be happy if anyone can make me understand this.

void main() {
   char *str = "example string";
   wrapChrInStr(str, 'a');
}

void wrapChrInStr(char *str, unsigned char chr) {
   char *ptr = str;
   char c;

   while((c = *ptr)) {
       if(c != chr) {
           *str = c;
           str++;
           ptr++;
       } else {
           ptr++;
       }
   }
   *str = '\0';
}
  • str is pointing to read only memory, *str = '\0'; will fail with segfault. You can declare str as char str[] = "..." or with a fixed size char str[50] = "...." – Pablo Mar 22 at 0:33
  • thank you for your answer. Why its read only can you explain please ? – Eray Xx Mar 22 at 0:36
  • 1
    Because "example string" is a string literal and they usually are stored in a read-only section. – Pablo Mar 22 at 0:38
  • Thank you. I'm doing a lot of c programming and its really weird that i never faced that before. – Eray Xx Mar 22 at 7:58
1

Thank you. I'm doing a lot of c programming and its really weird that i never faced that before.

Probably because you don't realize that there are different ways of storing a C-String. You may have been lucky enough never to have encountered a segfault because of this.

String literals

A string literal is declared with double quotation marks, e.g.

"hello world"

This string is usually stored in a read-only section. When using string literals, it's best to declare the variables with a const like this:

const char *str = "hello world";

With this you know that str is pointing to read-only memory location and you cannot manipulate the contents of the string. In fact, if you do this:

const char *str = "hello world";
str[0] = 'H';
// or the equivalent
*str = 'H'

the compiler will return an error like this:

a.c:5:5: error: assignment of read-only location ‘*str’

which I found very helpful, because you cannot accidentally manipulate the contents pointed to by str.

Arrays

If you need to manipulate the contents of a string, then you need to store the string in an array, e.g.

char str[] = "hello word";

In this case the compiler knows that the string literal has 10 characters and reserves 11 bytes (1 byte for '\0' - the terminating byte) for str and initializes the array with the contents of the string literal.

Here you can do stuff like

str[0] = 'H'

but you cannot access beyond the 11th byte.

You can also declare an array with a fixed size. In this case the size must be at least the same as the length+1 of the string literal.

char str[11] = "Hello world";

If you declare less space (char str[3] = "hello world"; for example), your compiler will warn you with something like this

a.c:4:14: warning: initializer-string for array of chars is too long

but I'm not sure what happens if you execute the code anyway. I think this is a case of undefined behaviour and that means: anything can happen.

Personally, I usually declare my string without a fixed size, unless there is a reason for having a fixed size.

  • "In this case the size must be at least the same as the length+1 of the string literal." - the +1 does not apply, you even showed this in your example (there are 11 nonzero characters in the initializer of char str[11]) – M.M Mar 22 at 3:56
  • Yeah but for a proper program its true. Because a string without termination character would cause a undefined behaviour – Eray Xx Mar 22 at 8:01

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