42

I agree that this code:

var y = switch (0) {
    case 0 -> '0';
    case 1 -> 0.0F;
    case 2 -> 2L;
    case 3 -> true;
    default -> 4;
};
System.out.println(y);
System.out.println(((Object) y).getClass().getName());

returns this:

0
java.lang.Character

But if you remove boolean:

var y = switch (0) {
    case 0 -> '0';
    case 1 -> 0.0F;
    case 2 -> 2L;
    default -> 4;
};
System.out.println(y);
System.out.println(((Object) y).getClass().getName());

returns this:

48.0
java.lang.Float

I suppose this result is unexpected.

  • Probably some kind of optimization. In the second example you can map all results to Float, in the first example they are just only Objects. – Ralf Renz Mar 22 at 7:03
  • 13
    I would imagine it is for the same reason as true ? '0' : false would return a Character because it necessarily requires boxing, whereas true ? '0' : 0.0f would return a float because binary numeric promotion would occur. – Andy Turner Mar 22 at 7:16
  • 3
    Can anybody point me to the bit of the language spec where they are defined. I can't find "switch expression" mentioned. – Andy Turner Mar 22 at 7:28
46

According to the switch expression's JEP, a switch expression is a poly expression:

A switch expression is a poly expression; if the target type is known, this type is pushed down into each arm. The type of a switch expression is its target type, if known; if not, a standalone type is computed by combining the types of each case arm.

Because you don't have a target type, the expression is not checked to match any given type, which is expected.

You can verify this by replacing var with a type:

int y = switch (0) {
    case 0 -> '0';
    case 1 -> 0.0F;
    case 2 -> 2L;
    case 3 -> true;
    default -> 4;
};

In my shell, this fails with:

|  Error:
|  incompatible types: bad type in switch expression
|      possible lossy conversion from float to int
|      case 1 -> 0.0F;
|                ^--^
|  Error:
|  incompatible types: bad type in switch expression
|      possible lossy conversion from long to int
|      case 2 -> 2L;
|                ^^
|  Error:
|  incompatible types: bad type in switch expression
|      boolean cannot be converted to int
|      case 3 -> true;
|                ^--^

But if you remove boolean:...

It should be enough to see how the standalone type is determined (rules here):

The type of a standalone switch expression is determined as follows:

  • If the result expressions all have the same type (which may be the null type), then that is the type of the switch expression.
  • Otherwise, if the type of each result expression is boolean or Boolean, an unboxing conversion (5.1.8) is applied to each result expression of type Boolean, and the switch expression has type boolean.
  • Otherwise, if the type of each result expression is convertible to a numeric type (5.1.8), the type of the switch expression is the result of numeric promotion (5.6) applied to the result expressions.

  • Otherwise, boxing conversion (5.1.7) is applied to each result expression that has a primitive type, after which the type of the switch expression is the result of applying capture conversion (5.1.10) to the least upper bound (4.10.4) of the types of the result expressions.

As far as I can see, when you remove the boolean expression, you're left with numeric expressions (char '0' (int 48) is promoted to float 48.0). See third bullet point above.

And as for why float is the result's type, see the Numeric Contexts section.

  • 7
    good answer. 1+, this indeed follows whatever the binary numeric promotion existed in the JLS until switch expressions were added. – Eugene Mar 22 at 8:35
  • why the first output gives you java.lang.Character class? because boolean is after a float class. why float is not casting? – Akash Shah Mar 22 at 8:41
  • 5
    @AkashShah I believe it's because no type conversion occurs. I haven't verified this, but I think the least upper bound for all these expression's types is java.lang.Object. So it boils down to something like Object y = ... and the actual type of the result ends up being printed (java.lang.Character being the boxed type of the matched case expression, which returns '0') – ernest_k Mar 22 at 8:46
  • 7
    @Ilya no, when you use var, there is no target type. In that case, the right-hand side has to be treated as stand-alone expression (not poly expression), to determine the expression type, then, the variable will get the resulting type. As said by Andy Turner, the behavior is consistent with previous Java versions. The takeaway is, when the type is not obvious, don’t use var to declare a variable. – Holger Mar 22 at 10:38
  • 6
    @Ilya no, in the first example, the variable’s type is an intersection type of Object,Serializable, and Comparable<?>. If you want Object (which would be relevant if you want to assign another value at a later point), you have to declare it explicitly. Your question’s example is equivalent to var y = x == 0? '0': x == 1? 0.0F: x == 2? 2L: x == 3? true: 4;. As said, use var when the right-hand side is obvious only. No-one forces you to use it at other places. – Holger Mar 22 at 11:51

This site is temporarily in read only mode and not accepting new answers.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .