0

I have a custom exception which looks like the following:

public abstract class MyException : Exception
{
    public MyException()
    {
    }

    public MyException(string message) : base(message)
    {
    }

    public MyException(string message, Exception inner) : base(message, inner)
    {

    }

    public abstract HttpStatusCode GetHttpStatusCode();
}

And a derived class:

public class ForbiddenException : MyException
{
    public override HttpStatusCode GetHttpStatusCode()
    {
        return HttpStatusCode.Forbidden;
    }
}

I want the derived classes to either use, or be forced to implement, the constructor formats in the abstract class.

Currently using the above, when I try to create a ForbiddenException, I get the following error:

throw new ForbiddenException("Request forbidden");

ForbiddenException does not contain a constructor that takes 1 arguments

I could manually put the constructors into each derived class of MyException but this is error prone + repeating myself.

Any advice would be appreciated.

  • You can't. Constructors aren't inherited, it's just up to each class to implement the appropriate ones. I think tools like ReSharper (IIRC) will prompt you if you're derived from Exception to provide all four constructors and the serialization override. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 22 at 12:55
  • The other thing I could do is - instead of having an abstract base class - I could just make each custom exception derive from Exception and implement a custom interface like IHasHttpStatusCode which contains the GetHttpStatusCode method... Not sure which I prefer though – TomSelleck Mar 22 at 13:04
  • You could as well just use composition and a factory. It may not play as well with try/catch matching, but throw HttpResponseExceptions.forbidden('optional message'); where it returns a new instance of HttpResponseException. The downside is that you would have to catch HttpResponseException and then check it's code rather than matching, a switch on the code would most likely be as readable. – plalx Mar 22 at 13:52
0

If you want to avoid copying & pasting/errors when re-writing, consider using a Text Template. I've placed this in a .tt template in my toy class library, which I also copied your MyException into:

<#@ template debug="false" hostspecific="false" language="C#" #>
<#@ assembly name="System.Core" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Linq" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Text" #>
<#@ import namespace="System.Collections.Generic" #>
<#@ output extension=".cs" #>
using System;

namespace ClassLibrary2
{

<# StandardConstructors("public","ForbiddenException","MyException"); #>

}
<#+
  public void StandardConstructors(string modifiers,
       string derivedException, string baseException)
    {
        Write(modifiers);
        Write(" partial class ");
        Write(derivedException);
        Write(":");
        WriteLine(baseException);
        WriteLine("{");

        Write("\tpublic ");
        Write(derivedException);
        WriteLine("() {}");

        Write("\tpublic ");
        Write(derivedException);
        WriteLine("(string message):base(message)");
        WriteLine("\t{}");

        Write("\tpublic ");
        Write(derivedException);
        WriteLine("(string message, Exception inner):base(message,inner)");
        WriteLine("\t{}");

        WriteLine("}");
    }
#>

The only error I immediately get is I've not implemented GetHttpStatusCode but I'd expect you to be writing that in a separate file that also defines the same partial ForbiddenException class. Each new derived exception just needs you to add another StandardConstructors line to the template file. Far less error prone.

Of course, you can make this as fancy as you like, I just wrote this from scratch in a few minutes1.

This is one the above template produces:

using System;

namespace ClassLibrary2
{

public partial class ForbiddenException:MyException
{
    public ForbiddenException() {}
    public ForbiddenException(string message):base(message)
    {}
    public ForbiddenException(string message, Exception inner):base(message,inner)
    {}
}

}

Not pretty but it doesn't have to be - it's generated code.


1E.g. if the tabs/spacing really irks you, but also if e.g. you want to have more control over modifiers, etc.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.