46

Using match (like in bar) seems to be a common approach..

#[derive(Debug)]
pub enum MyErrors {
    SomeError,
}

fn foo(x: Option<u64>) -> Result<u64, MyErrors> {
    if x.is_none() {
      return Err(MyErrors::SomeError);
    } 

    // .. some long code where more options
    // are checked and matched 
    // The ok here is just so the code is simple and compiles
    Ok(x.unwrap() * 2)
}

fn bar(x: Option<u64>) -> Result<u64, MyErrors> {
    match x {
        None => {
            return Err(MyErrors::SomeError)?;
        }
        Some(v) => {
           // .. some long code where more options
           // are checked and matched 
           // The ok here is just so the code is simple and compiles
           Ok(x.unwrap() * 2)
        }
    }
}


fn main() {
    foo(Some(1));
    bar(Some(2));
}

However, early returns (such as in foo) significantly reduce how nested the code looks like. If there are multiple times when an option has to be unwrapped or an error returned, code like bar gets very nested...

What is the recommended practice for early returning an error in the case of empty options?

5
  • 1
    If you're a fan of method chains, there's ok_or.
    – user6564029
    Commented Mar 22, 2019 at 21:12
  • 1
    If you don't mind, I'd prefer if you waited a bit before accepting my answer. A better one can very well appear. But that's completely up to you, of course.
    – user6564029
    Commented Mar 22, 2019 at 21:46
  • Ok, I just liked your answer very much :)
    – Juan Leni
    Commented Mar 22, 2019 at 21:56
  • 1
    what wrong with x.and_then(|x| Some(x * 2)).ok_or(MyErrors::SomeError) ?
    – Stargateur
    Commented Mar 23, 2019 at 0:21
  • 1
    nothing, just that given that there is a lot of code coming after, I am actually looking for an early return approach. ok_or_else+? is ideal.
    – Juan Leni
    Commented Mar 23, 2019 at 8:11

2 Answers 2

66

If a longer method chain is undesirable due to complex logic inside, there are still a few readable, low-indent options.

ok_or and ?

We can convert an Option to a Result with a desired error, and immediately unwrap it with the ? operator. This solution probably provides the least indent possible, and can be easily used to "unwrap" multiple Options.

fn bar1(x: Option<u64>) -> Result<u64, MyErrors> {
    let x = x.ok_or(MyErrors::SomeError)?;
    // A lot of stuff going on.
    Ok(x * 2)
}

This will evaluate the error inside ok_or regardless of whether or not it will actually be used. If this computation is expensive, ok_or_else, which produces the error lazily, will be more efficient (related question).

if let

This solution can still lead to a staircase of code if nested, but may be more appropriate if the else branch logic is more involved.

fn bar2(x: Option<u64>) -> Result<u64, MyErrors> {
    if let Some(x) = x {
        // Lot of stuff here as well.
        Ok(x * 2)
    } else {
        Err(MyErrors::SomeError)
    }
}
4
  • 1
    This is a nice approach - just adapted it myself for the same 'problem'. Part of me wishes the ? operator could actually be used for early return of None just like errors from Result, but it probably makes more sense (ie. return values are more 'meaningful') just to use result anyways
    – kevlarr
    Commented Jun 2, 2020 at 2:43
  • 3
    @kevlarr You can use ? with Options, it's mixing them with Results which is a touch awkward. On nightly you can impl From<NoneError> for MyError and enable try_trait feature, and it will work. Most error handling libraries, I'd imagine, also provide nice helpers for this - I'm mostly a snafu user, see OptionExt in its docs.
    – user6564029
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 7:13
  • 2
    Wow... I didn't realize about ? with options... Sigh.. Thanks!
    – kevlarr
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 14:02
  • ? is not from the Option, it's from Result, but you transfor, from Option to Result when you call .ok_or Commented Mar 4 at 17:53
9

Since Rust 1.65, you can use a let-else statement:

fn bar3(x: Option<u64>) -> Result<u64, MyErrors> {
    let Some(x) = x else {
        return Err(MyErrors::SomeError);
    };
    Ok(x * 2)
}

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