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After login, I want a web-page to be able to provide both firefox and MSIE-8+ web-site clients the ability to download and install a unique SSL client certificate for the website so they need never login again from that machine.

The back-end is simple and done - I have a directory on my linux web-server where typing "make USER=$username ${username}.crt.pkcs12" will create a new client key and a valid, signed PKCS-12 SSL client certificate file .

But how to best provide a single method whereby both logged-in (with password) MSIE and firefox users can download these certificates and bring up the "install client certificate" browser GUI dialog ?

It is straightforward to simply push the certificate as a file of mime-type ? - say 'application/x-pkcs7-certreqresp' ?? so the user is prompted to save the file; but I want them to be prompted to add the certificate for this website to the SSL certificate manager's client cert store. Then I found this for firefox.

So this is fairly straightforward
but all I can find for MSIE is this.

So it is simple to invoke firefox'x security manager API from javascript, but I can find no way of doing so from MSIE's javascript - one would need to invoke .NET C# code to access the .NET APIs, and the X509Store APIs seem not to be exported to MSIE javascript .

As I see it, options are then to provide a mono .NET web service on my linux webserver and redirect requests from MSIE clients for the certificates to this service , which can then download .NET code that the client runs to install the certificate ?

Or I can make MSIE clients download a "Install_Cert.VB" visual basic script that will run "WinHttpCertCfg.exe" ?

Or is there some magic MSIE security manager javascript API that I'm just not finding ?

Sorry, I've been a windows refusnik since 1992; I use only Linux / Solaris / BSD / MacOS and do not have access to a windows machine.

Anyone been here before / have any advice to offer ? If so, it would be much appreciated ! Thanks in advance, Jason

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Probably not an answer you'd expect to get, but the easiest you can do is create an ActiveX that will put the certificate to the right certificate store in IE. Since ActiveX is only handled by IE, you will have IE-specific solution and you will need to have just one version of ActiveX control. For Firefox (and Chrome and Opera) you would need to find other solutions.

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    Many thanks Eugene! but please clarify: "the right certificate store in IE" and where I can find such documented - thanks! – JVD Apr 3 '11 at 20:02
  • Hmm ... I thought ASP .NET is the way to go. since it is fully supported by Apache mod_mono ? I could simply re-direct MSIE browsers to the mod_mono ASP .NET page that would download the certficate and a C# .net ActiveX control to invoke the security manager interface ? Or can I develop C# to be compiled into a an ActiveX object by mono and then requested by MSIE clients ? Anyone know of any examples of this, especially then the name(s) of the MSIE X509Store objects I need to modify in order to bring up a "install certificate dialog", or where such might be documented ? – JVD Apr 3 '11 at 20:57
  • @JVD you don't need an ASP.NET on the server to serve ActiveX. Now, ActiveX controls are usually written in native languages (C++, Delphi). Writing them in .NET is both tricky and not quite handy in your case. If you use C++, you can call CryptoAPI functions of Windows. With Delphi you can use our SecureBlackbox components ( eldos.com/SecureBlackbox ) – Eugene Mayevski 'Allied Bits Apr 4 '11 at 3:51
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    @EJP: yes, the site will be capable of generating keys ON BEHALF of logged-in clients - really, expecting the average computer user to know how to correctly generate a des key and x509 certificate is beyond the realms of plausibility - most have trouble entering their own email or address into a web form ! – JVD Apr 4 '11 at 12:16
  • @EJP (cont.): but every client will get their own UNIQUE password encrypted certificate to access the site - they'll have to enter a password to decrypt their newly generated key when the browser installs it ; then this password is stored in their "keychain" (at least it is in firefox) and they are prompted to enter their keychain password once at browser startup. – JVD Apr 4 '11 at 12:19
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Here's some documentation about ways to get client side SSL certificates installed.

As you might expect, every browser is different, mobile devices are missing features in many cases, and there are lots of ways to do the same thing. Looks like many people are banging their heads on this stuff.

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What you are doing is radically insecure. Private keys are supposed to be private. So generating a private key for somebody else is a contradiction in terms. The corresponding certificate is also supposed to uniquely identify the client. In this case it could identify either the generating code or any of the client(s) to which it has issued the key and certificate.

You need another solution.

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    @EJP: yes, the site will be capable of generating keys ON BEHALF of logged-in clients - really, expecting the average computer user to know how to correctly generate a des key and x509 certificate is beyond the realms of plausibility - most have trouble entering their own email or address into a web form - but every client will get their own UNIQUE password encrypted certificate to access the site - they'll have to enter a password to decrypt their newly generated key when the browser installs it ; then this password is stored in their "keychain" (at least it is in firefox) and they are – JVD Apr 4 '11 at 11:48
  • <pre> Const AT_KEYEXCHANGE = 1 Const XECR_PKCS10_V2_0 = 1 Dim CertEnroll Set CertEnroll = CreateObject( "CEnroll.CEnroll" ) CertEnroll.ProviderName = _ "Microsoft Enhanced Cryptographic Provider v1.0" CertEnroll.KeySpec = AT_KEYEXCHANGE CertEnroll.GenKeyFlags = 1024 * (256*256) CertEnroll.addCertTypeToRequest "ClientAuth" CertEnroll.CreateFileRequest _ XECR_PKCS10_V2_0, _ "", _ "", _ "request.req" </pre> – JVD Apr 4 '11 at 13:23
  • Eventually, what I hope to achieve is: o A custom apache 'mod_auth_XXX' module that triggers SSL client cert negotiation, if it fails, falls back to using cookies + password or users chosen external authenticator (eg. OpenID) , and if this succeeds, presents users ability to download a unique password encrypted PKCS cert that they are prompted to install in MSIE or firefox browser GUI. (You almost don't need a custom module to do this, but it helps.) I can't see any security problems with above if implemented correctly - can anyone else ? – JVD Apr 4 '11 at 14:02
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    @JVD: If you want to clarify your question, edit it. Don't put responses in edits to questions. – nmichaels Apr 4 '11 at 14:14
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    @JVD: You're clearly new here; I was trying to let you know how things are done. The reason your edit never showed up in EJP's answer is that it was rejected by people with edit privileges for the reason I gave in my previous comment. The reason for the edit button is so you can improve answers. Look at the "How to Edit" box that pops up when you click the edit button. See also the faq – nmichaels Apr 4 '11 at 14:43

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