100

I have been reading lots of articles about this, and it seems that there are multiple ways to do this with many authors advising against some implementations.

To make this simple I have created a really simple version of what I would like to achieve.

I have a parent Vue, parent.vue. It has a button:

<template>
    <div>
        <button v-on:click="XXXXX call method in child XXXX">Say Hello</button>
    </div>
</template>

In the child Vue, child.vue I have a method with a function:

methods: {
    sayHello() {

        alert('hello');
   }
  }

I would like to call the sayHello() function when I click the button in the parent.

I am looking for the best practice way to do this. Suggestions I have seen include Event Bus, and Child Component Refs and props, etc.

What would be the simplest way to just execute the function in my method?

Apologies, this does seem extremely simple, but I have really tried to do some research.

Thanks!

0

9 Answers 9

172

One easy way is to do this:

<!-- parent.vue -->
<template>
    <button @click="$refs.myChild.sayHello()">Click me</button>
    <child-component ref="myChild" />
</template>

Simply create a ref for the child component, and you will be able to call the methods, and access all the data it has.

7
  • 21
    This should be the accepted answer. There's absolutely no gain from using a prop/watcher method. Using refs in this way doesn't create any more coupling to the child component that using a prop/watcher does. In fact, that method is far more convoluted as you'll have to dig in to the child component to understand what's going on. By using a ref it's quite clear that a method on a child component is being called.
    – James
    Jul 25, 2021 at 23:12
  • 6
    WARNING $refs are only populated after the component has been rendered. It is only meant as an escape hatch for direct child manipulation - you should avoid accessing $refs from within templates or computed properties.
    – vch
    Sep 23, 2021 at 18:10
  • 1
    @vch I can agree with that, but the alternative is one of the other complex answers on this page. However, the component you want to control has to be rendered anyhow before you try to control it, that is true in any situation. One of the other answers here uses a property as a trigger; interesting thing here is that you can change that property all you want even when there's no child component reacting to it at all. In my answer, you are certain that you will get an error when $refs.myChild is undefined.
    – Flame
    Sep 23, 2021 at 21:39
  • 2
    Best practice would probably be to attach an event handler to the click event, and then access $refs.myChild from there
    – vch
    Sep 24, 2021 at 10:47
  • 31
    For anyone that runs into the same problem as me, to add to the above answer, if you're using <script setup> make sure you add defineExpose({childFunction}) on the child component to expose the function. Also, if you are calling a component that has multiple instances (i.e. it's in a v-for loop) then you need to call it by index: $refs.childComponent[x].childFunction(). Hope this helps someone, it took me a while to figure this out because none of the examples I found include this info!
    – BenW301
    Dec 22, 2021 at 2:13
44

You can create a ref and access the methods, but this is not recommended. You shouldn't rely on the internal structure of a component. The reason for this is that you'll tightly couple your components and one of the main reasons to create components is to loosely couple them.

You should rely on the contract (interface in some frameworks/languages) to achieve this. The contract in Vue relies on the fact that parents communicate with children via props and children communicate with parents via events.

There are also at least 2 other methods to communicate when you want to communicate between components that aren't parent/child:

  • the event bus
  • vuex

I'll describe now how to use a prop:

  1. Define it on your child component

    props: ['testProp'],
    methods: {
      sayHello() {
        alert('hello');
      }
    }
    
  2. Define a trigger data on the parent component

    data () {
     return {
       trigger: 0
     }
    }
    
  3. Use the prop on the parent component

    <template>
     <div>
        <childComponent :testProp="trigger"/>
      </div>
    </template>
    
  4. Watch testProp in the child component and call sayHello

    watch: { 
        testProp: function(newVal, oldVal) {
          this.sayHello()
        }
    }
    
  5. Update trigger from the parent component. Make sure that you always change the value of trigger, otherwise the watch won't fire. One way of doing this is to increment trigger, or toggle it from a truthy value to a falsy one (this.trigger = !this.trigger)

9
  • 78
    I dont like the way how a prop is being used as a trigger here. I doubt this is the recommended solution by vue. It is not clear that you are calling a function when you change your trigger variable. You are now as much relying on the 'internal structure of a component' as with calling $refs.childComp.sayHello(), since testProp is a property just as sayHello() is.
    – Flame
    Aug 9, 2019 at 12:35
  • 7
    Actually using props to communicate from parent to child is the recommended way. You are not relying on the internal structure of the component, you are relying on the props that the component exposes, which is very similar to how an interface, or public fields of a class would behave. The fact that the prop, at the moment, calls sayHello is an implementation details. The parent should not rely on that, it should rely on the fact that what testProp does is documented, without looking at the implementation. Aug 10, 2019 at 7:03
  • 3
    If you're demoing how to call a function using a prop and a watcher then this is a bad design and still coupled. The better way would be to emit a "triggerAlert" event and implement the method in the parent, but personally there are times when this feels to violate SRP. Personally, I don't think there is anything wrong with calling a publicly exposed method where it makes sense. I see too many instances of people contorting implementations to fit props-down/event-up when they can just make a method call.
    – GHOST-34
    Jun 7, 2021 at 16:31
  • 7
    "using refs and calling methods is bad, let's find a way around with a convoluted method that still relies on the internal structure". It's semantics really.
    – Capsule
    Jul 21, 2021 at 0:03
  • 6
    This is absolutely worse than using a ref and directly calling the method. You're just as depending on the child component as before, but now your code logic has become unreadable too.
    – René Roth
    Jul 27, 2021 at 13:56
41

I don't like the look of using props as triggers, but using ref also seems as an anti-pattern and is generally not recommended.

Another approach might be: You can use events to expose an interface of methods to call on the child component this way you get the best of both worlds while keeping your code somehow clean. Just emit them at the mounting stage and use them when pleased. I stored it in the $options part in the below code, but you can do as pleased.

Child component

<template>
  <div>
    <p>I was called {{ count }} times.</p>
  </div>
</template>
<script>
  export default {
    mounted() {
      // Emits on mount
      this.emitInterface();
    },
    data() {
      return {
        count: 0
      }
    },
    methods: {

      addCount() {
        this.count++;
      },

      notCallable() {
        this.count--;
      },

      /**
       * Emitting an interface with callable methods from outside
       */
      emitInterface() {
        this.$emit("interface", {
          addCount: () => this.addCount()
        });
      }

    }
  }
</script>

Parent component

<template>
  <div>
    <button v-on:click="addCount">Add count to child</button>
    <child-component @interface="getChildInterface"></child-component>
  </div>
</template>
<script>
  export default {
    // Add a default
    childInterface: {
      addCount: () => {}
    },

    methods: {
      // Setting the interface when emitted from child
      getChildInterface(childInterface) {
        this.$options.childInterface = childInterface;
      },

      // Add count through the interface
      addCount() {
        this.$options.childInterface.addCount();
      }
    }
  }
</script>
8
  • 4
    I simply cannot believe this is the first upvote of your GREAT answer in 7 years... thank you! Feb 26, 2022 at 23:23
  • 5
    I nearly fainted when I implemented this in 1 minute and it worked. This is world news..!
    – Nebulosar
    Mar 11, 2022 at 12:52
  • 5
    This should be the selected answer as it does not mess with props, watchers or refs, stays true to Vue components and just uses some good old fashioned programming principles.
    – barnacle.m
    May 21, 2022 at 19:42
  • 2
    I don't understand how it decouples child and parent, if you want to rename addCount in addCounter, you are still required to change parent and child?
    – Adam
    Dec 22, 2022 at 7:15
  • 4
    @Vitim.us Yep, nothing was achieved beyond using ref, but somehow this Rube Goldberg machine has people upvoting, complimenting principles, fainting, and believing 7 years passed in 1 month. Attention: the official and much simpler way to declare a public interface on a Vue component is expose. May 25, 2023 at 5:48
29

With vue 3 composition api you can use defineExpose. More information can be found here

Parent.vue

<script setup lang="ts">
const childRef = ref()

const callSayHello = () => {
  childRef.value.sayHello()
}
</script>

<template>
  <child ref="childRef"></child>
</template>

<style scoped></style>

Child.vue

<script setup lang="ts">
const sayHello = () => {
  console.log('Hello')
}
defineExpose({ sayHello })
</script>

<template></template>

<style scoped></style>
2
  • Where can we read more for "defineExpose" ?
    – mart cube
    Jan 29, 2023 at 15:35
  • That's works exactly as expected with Vue 3. For the question for @martcube, "defineExpose" is a compiler macro in Vue3 and no need to be imported. To know more about read here vuejs.org/api/sfc-script-setup.html#defineexpose
    – Muneer
    Jan 30, 2023 at 6:26
3

if you're using <script setup> you should be aware that your component is closed by default. Meaning everything is private and you won't be able to access properties or methods outside the component UNLESS You use defineExpose() to expose properties/methods you need. Here's an example:

<script setup>
import { ref } from 'vue'

const a = 1
const b = ref(2)

defineExpose({
  a,
  b
})
</script>

Here's a reference to vue's documentation

3

Creating a property and a watcher in the child element is overly complicated. I liked Flame's answer the most, but I had a lot if trouble getting it to work in typescript with type information and the options API. If you want to read more, look at this answer.

Here is the solution for Vue 3 + Typescript + Options API with type information:

// 2023-05-21
Vue        3.3.4
Typescript 5.0.4
Vite       4.3.8

In the child:

export default {
  expose: ['childMethod'],
  methods: {
    childMethod() {
      /* ... */
    },
  }
}

Using expose is not necessary, but I like it.

In the parent:

  • Add a ref to the child component
<ChildComponent ref="childComponent"></ChildComponent>
  • A wrapper function
methods: {
  callChildMethod() {
    (this.$refs.childComponent as typeof ChildComponent).childMethod();
  },
}
  • and finally you can call the method from an event
<something v-on:click="callChildMethod()"></something>

You unfortunately can not directly do this

<something v-on:click="($refs.childComponent as typeof ChildComponent).childMethod()"></something>
2

I am not sure is this the best way. But I can explain what I can do... Codesandbox Demo : https://codesandbox.io/s/q4xn40935w

From parent component, send a prop data lets say msg. Have a button at parent whenever click the button toggle msg true/false

<template>
  <div class="parent">
    Button from Parent : 
    <button @click="msg = !msg">Say Hello</button><br/>
    <child :msg="msg"/>
  </div>
</template>

<script>
import child from "@/components/child";

export default {
  name: "parent",
  components: { child },
  data: () => ({
    msg: false
  })
};
</script>

In child component watch prop data msg. Whenever msg changes trigger a method.

 <template>
  <div class="child">I am Child Component</div>
</template>

<script>
export default {
  name: "child",
  props: ["msg"],
  watch: {
    msg() {
      this.sayHello();
    }
  },
  methods: {
    sayHello() {
      alert("hello");
    }
  }
};
</script>
1

This is an alternate take on Jonas M's excellent answer. Return the interface with a promise, no need for events. You will need a Deferred class.

IMO Vue is deficient in making calling child methods difficult. Refs aren't always a good option - in my case I need to call a method in one of a thousand grandchildren.

Parent

    <child :getInterface="getInterface" />
    ...
    
    export default {
        setup(props) {
            init();
        }
        async function init() {
            ...
            state.getInterface = new Deferred();
            state.childInterface = await state.getInterface.promise;
            state.childInterface.doThing();
        }
    }

Child

    export default {
        props: {
            getInterface: Deferred,
        },
        setup(props) {
            watch(() => props.getInterface, () => {
                if(!props.getInterface) return;
                props.getInterface.resolve({
                    doThing: () => {},
                    doThing2: () => {},
                });
            });
        }
    }
1
  • Please update your answer's parent example to contain full code, like your child example. So others that are not aware that there is a difference between options api and composition api in vue components.
    – John C
    May 30, 2022 at 1:56
1

Clear example with Vue 3 ts Setup script

// Parent

<template>
  <button @click="doSomething">doSomething</button>
</template>
<script setup lang="ts">
  const doSomething() {}
  defineExpose({
    doSomething
  })
</script>

// Parent

<template>
  <child-component ref="childComponentRef" />
  <button @click="triggerDoSomething">Trigger Child's Action</button>
</template>
<script setup lang="ts">
import { ref } from "vue";
import ChildComponent from "./ChildComponent.vue";
 const childComponentRef = ref(null);
 
 const triggerDoSomething = () => {
     if (childComponentRef.value) {
         (childComponentRef.value as { doSomething: () => void }).doSomething();
     }
 };
</script>
1
  • the child ref doesn't work for me :( it says it's undefined when I try to run the function on it in the parent.
    – Elrinth
    Feb 9 at 15:33

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