1

I have got a homework where I should do some action again and again till I write "stop" in console, BUT I can't use for, while, goto, switch, [], typedef in all my code. So how can I replace the loop?

  • 6
    you can use recursion – Darlyn Mar 24 at 9:26
  • You can also use template meta programming with variadic parameters to realize loops at compile time. – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 24 at 9:29
  • @πάνταῥεῖ It sounds like the duration of the loop needs to be determined at runtime. – Daniel H Mar 24 at 9:32
  • 1
    You can use setjmp/longjmp since those are not on your list of forbidden operations. – Jesper Juhl Mar 24 at 9:54
  • 1
    @JesperJuhl Awwwwwwww! – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 24 at 10:17
8

Recursion may be used. This example repeats what you enter until you type "stop" as an example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

void do_it()
{
  std::string s;
  std::cin >> s;
  if (s == "stop")
    return;
  std::cout << s << '\n';
  do_it();
}

int main()
{
  do_it();
  return 0;
}

It may not be the case here but recursion has its drawbacks. For one thing it is slower than a simple loop because in languages like C++, function call is relatively expensive. And it might cause stack overflow if it recurs too many times. Having said that, recursive version of the function can sometimes be cleaner and easier to read/understand. You can learn more about pros and cons of recursion here.

2

As noted in comments by Jesper Juhl, they banned goto but forgot to ban setjmp/longjmp!

Unlike recursion-based solutions, setjmp/longjmp can't possibly cause a stack overflow if you iterate too many times.

#include <csetjmp>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string s;

    std::jmp_buf jump_buffer;
    setjmp(jump_buffer);

    std::cin >> s;

    if (s == "stop")
        return 0;

    std::cout << s << '\n';
    std::longjmp(jump_buffer, 0);
}

Note that longjmp is potentially dangeruous, since it doesn't call destructors. Because of that it should be avoided when possible.

1

Challenge accepted -- C version for the original tag

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    if (strcmp(*argv, "stop")) {
        char *in = malloc(99);       // assume it worked
        fgets(in, 99, stdin);        // assume it worked
        *(in+strcspn(in, "\n")) = 0; // remove trailing ENTER
        main(argc + 1, &in);         // memory leak
    } else {
        printf("Stopped after %d entries.\n", argc - 1);
    }
}

See code running at ideone: https://ideone.com/Slx4g9

  • 2
    You may not call main yourself. main may not be recursive (at least not in C++) – Ayxan Mar 24 at 9:43
  • @Ayxan: calling main() is allowed in C. – pmg Mar 24 at 9:45
  • 3
    I think you should at least note it in the answer since the question is tagged C++ – Ayxan Mar 24 at 9:47

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