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I'm writing a function to filter the first qualified value from a list in Haskell.

I tried out the function base on filter function, but I don't know how did the function run.

So I add trace to each case.

filter' :: (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a]
filter' p (x:xs) | p x       = trace "{1}" x : (filter' p xs)
                 | otherwise = trace "{2}" filter' p xs
filter' p [] = []


filterFirst :: (a->Bool) -> [a]->[a]
filterFirst p xs = case (trace "{3}" (filter' p xs)) of 
  (x : xs) -> trace "{4}" [x]
  otherwise -> trace "{5}" []

when testing:

filterFirst even [2,2] turns out

{3}
{4}
[{1}
2]

filterFirst even [1,2] turns out

{3}
{2}
{4}
[{1}
2]

filterFirst even [1,1,2] turns out

{3}
{2}
{2}
{4}
[{1}
2]

The result [2] is correct, but the executing sequence is wired.

  1. Why does {4} executed before {1}?
  2. {3} seems to only execute once, Why does case of know when to test (x : xs)?
  3. How does case of execute exactly?
1
  • 1
    If you try to compile that code, you're going to get a warning about otherwise being an unused variable. You mean _.
    – melpomene
    Mar 24 '19 at 11:30
3
trace "{1}" x : (filter' p xs)

parses as

(trace "{1}" x) : (filter' p xs)

Similarly,

trace "{2}" filter' p xs

parses as

(trace "{2}" filter') p xs

If you want the other interpretation, you need to write trace "{1}" (x : (filter' p xs)) and trace "{2}" (filter' p xs), respectively.


I'm not sure about your question #3. Why would {3} execute multiple times? It's not part of a loop / recursion.

Let's step through the evaluation of

filterFirst even [2,2]

The interpreter wants to print the result, so we have to compute the result.

We enter the definition of filterFirst (the outside part of an expression is always evaluated first), giving

case (trace "{3}" (filter' p xs)) of 
  (x : xs) -> trace "{4}" [x]
  otherwise -> trace "{5}" []

where
    p = even
    xs = [2,2]

Here we need to make a decision. case needs to know which branch to evaluate, so it needs to know which pattern matches (x : xs or otherwise). So the first thing it does is to evaluate the expression we're analyzing:

trace "{3}" (filter' p xs)

where
    p = even
    xs = [2,2]

Here the outermost expression is a call to trace, which now prints {3} and hands over to

filter' p xs

where
    p = even
    xs = [2,2]

Now the outermost expression is a call to filter', which is defined as

filter' p (x:xs) | p x       = trace "{1}" x : (filter' p xs)
                 | otherwise = trace "{2}" filter' p xs
filter' p [] = []

Again we have to make a decision: Which equation do we use? The choice depends on the value of the second argument, so this triggers the evaluation of (the outermost layer of) xs = [2,2]. Well, nothing interesting happens here because [2,2] is already fully evaluated.

[2,2] is syntactic sugar for 2 : (2 : []), so this matches the first equation, binding

p = even
x = 2
xs = 2 : []  -- same as [2]

We now have to evaluate the guard behind the pattern:

p x
even 2
True

Success! Our return value is trace "{1}" x : (filter' p xs), which (as mentioned above) is an application of (:) to two arguments, trace "{1}" x and filter' p xs.

No further evaluation happens here. Recall that we're still trying to evaluate

case ... of 
  (x : xs) -> trace "{4}" [x]
  otherwise -> trace "{5}" []

so we only care if the outermost constructor of the list is : or [], and we know it's : now. We select the first branch, which yields

trace "{4}" [x]

where
    x = trace "{1}" x_inner
    xs = filter' p xs_inner
    x_inner = 2
    xs_inner = 2 : []
    p = even

This is slightly confusing because you've named all your variables x and xs. If we inline all variables whose values we already know, the bindings reduce to:

trace "{4}" [x]

where
    x = trace "{1}" 2
    xs = filter' even (2 : [])

xs is not used at all and x is only used once, so this is really equivalent to

trace "{4}" [trace "{1}" 2]

Evaluating this first prints {4} (from trace), then yields

[trace "{1}" 2]
-- syntactic sugar for
(trace "{1}" 2) : []

Here the list printing code starts working: We've got a list of at least one element, so it outputs [ (the start of the list). To print the first element itself, we need to evaluate it:

trace "{1}" 2

This finally prints {1} and yields 2, which lets the list-printing code output 2 and ] (for the end of the list).

And that's it!

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  • Thanks a lot. I have a deeper question. For analysis above, 1. why filter' returned back to "case of" after executing {1}, rather than recursively call "(filter' p xs)" in "x : (filter' p xs)"? 2. Who leads this return? The "(x : xs) -> "case or filter' itself? This time we analyse the step of "filterFirst even [1,2]": After printing "{3}", program go into filter'. Then we choose the second guard. Then "trace "{2}" filter'" executed and printed "{2}" Then "filter' p xs" will be execute. For now, why program doen't return back to "case of" and select the second case?
    – zichao liu
    Mar 24 '19 at 15:38
  • @zichaoliu 1. filter' does not return back to case/of after printing {1}. In fact, {1} is printed last, long after filter' and case are done. I don't understand this question. 2. What return? The situation you described in #1 does not exist.
    – melpomene
    Mar 24 '19 at 16:57
  • @zichaoliu case can only select a branch once it knows which pattern matches. To do that, it has to evaluate the expression until it can determine the outcome of each pattern match. For example, to check whether x : xs matches, the expression has to be evaluated until the outermost constructor is known (which for lists is either : or []).
    – melpomene
    Mar 24 '19 at 16:58
  • My mistake, filter' does not execute {1} before return back. Actually I want to ask like that: I have two possibilities about jumping unqualified value, but don't know which one is correct. The first possibility: When filter' choose the second guard, filter' doesn't return. So filter' keeps recursive execution. Another possibility, When filter' chosing the second guard, filter' also returned. But "case of" lead "trace "{2}" filter' p xs" executes. So program go back to filter' again. Which possibility is right?
    – zichao liu
    Mar 25 '19 at 2:54
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I haven't checked everything but note that

trace "{1}" x : (filter' p xs)

means

(trace "{1}" x) : (filter' p xs)

so, {1} will be printed when you access the first element contents, and not when you just generate it. I think you wanted

trace "{1}" (x : (filter' p xs))

I would also rewrite the {2} line as

trace "{2}" (filter' p xs)
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  • My fault, I originally thought so.
    – zichao liu
    Mar 24 '19 at 15:47

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