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This question already has an answer here:

I've been playing around with some nuances of data structures and noticed something peculiar with tuples. Let's say I assign a variable, x = 3 and then assign a variable y = 3. x and y will be referencing the same object. This is essentially the same as assigning a variable, x = 3, then assigning a variable x = y.

On the other hand if I assign a variable, x = [1,2] ([1,2] is a list) and then assign a variable y = [1,2] then x and y are actually referencing two different objects. Since lists are mutable it makes sense to create another object for y because if I then followed the variable assignments with x[0] = 42, x will be [42,2] and y will still be [1, 2]. On the other hand x = [1,2]; y = x; x[0] = 42 results in both x and y being [42, 2].

Essentially when data types are immutable it makes sense to reference different variables to the same object if they have the same value since this is more memory efficient.

This is what can be seen with strings (which are immutable). But for tuples (which are immutable) this is not the case. If I said x = (1,2) then y = (1,2) then x and y are actually referencing different objects. Why aren't they referencing the same object? Isn't this less memory efficient? Here's some code from the shell to illustrate what's happening.

>>> x = 3
>>> y = 3
>>> print(x is y)
True


>>> x = [1, 2]
>>> y = [1, 2]
>>> x is y
False
>>> x[0] = 42
>>> print(x)
[42, 2]
>>> print(y)
[1, 2]


>>> x = [1, 2]
>>> y = x
>>> x[0] = 42
>>> print(x)
[42, 2]
>>> print(y)
[42, 2]
>>> x is y
True


>>> x = "testing"
>>> y = "testing"
>>> print(x is y)
True


>>> x = (1, 2)
>>> y = (1, 2)
>>> print(x is y)
False

marked as duplicate by Nick A, Aran-Fey python Mar 24 at 19:44

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  • 1
    It's not true for strings in general. Try x='ab', y='abc'[:-1]. – dyukha Mar 24 at 19:37
  • 1
    Related, but still not quite a dupe: How does interning work with immutable objects? – Aran-Fey Mar 24 at 19:41
  • What behavior do you want for: a = ({'a':1}, {'a':2}); b = ({'a':1}, {'a':2}); b[0]['a'] = 3? Tuples are immutable, but they can contain references to mutable objects. – Mark Meyer Mar 24 at 19:46
  • Also, this behavior does not work with int objects in general. It is an implementation detail of CPython that small integers are cached. Almost all of the behavior you are talking about will be implementation details, that can and will change, so you shouldn't rely on them – juanpa.arrivillaga Mar 24 at 20:31