0

I've got two functions that accept different pointers pointing to different structs, but the structs have the same underlying function.

func Save(db *sql.DB) error {
  db.Prepare(query)
}

func TxSave(tx *sql.Tx) error {
  tx.Prepare(query)
}

I don't want to have to make changes in both functions when I need to extend this function in the future. How do I adhere to DRYness in golang with this scenario?

2

Create an interface such as:

type SQLRunner interface{
    Prepare(query string) (*sql.Stmt, error)
    PrepareContext(ctx context.Context, query string) (*sql.Stmt, error)
    Query(query string, args ...interface{}) (*Rows, error)
    QueryContext(ctx context.Context, query string, args ...interface{}) (*sql.Rows, error)
    // add as many method shared by both sql.Tx qnd sql.DB
    // ...
} 

And then create a single method taking that interface:

func Save(s SQLRunner) error {
    s.Prepare()
}

In go interface implementation is implicit, so you just have to pass *sql.Tx or *sql.DB to the save function:

Save(tx)
Save(db)

Here a good blog post about interfaces in go:http://jordanorelli.com/post/32665860244/how-to-use-interfaces-in-go

  • I actually came up with the same exact response right before you! I'll accept this as the correct answer since it has much more detail. – dimiguel Mar 26 at 5:37
  • 1
    Good you found out. Implicit interface implementation in Go is an extremely useful feature! – François P. Mar 26 at 5:38
0

Wow, I think I'm in love with Go. I can actually just do this by creating my own interface.

type Saver interface {
  Prepare(query string) (*sql.Stmt, error)
}

func Save(db *sql.DB) error {
  return GenericSave(db)
}

func TxSave(tx *sql.Tx) error {
  return GenericSave(tx)
}

func GenericSave(saver Saver) error {
  stmt := saver.Prepare(query)
  // Do rest with saver
}

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