2

I'm trying to take an int as a parameter and operate on it's bytes individually, for example take 0xDEADF00D and handle each byte one by one: 0xDE 0xAD 0xF0 0x0D

To do this, I've done the following code:

template <int state, int seed>
constexpr static uint32_t CalculateRandomFromState()
{
    const char bytes[4] = {
        (state >> 24) & 0xFF,
        (state >> 16) & 0xFF,
        (state >> 8) & 0xFF,
         state & 0xFF,
    };

    constexpr auto value = Compiletime::Hash<seed, sizeof(bytes)>(bytes);

    return value;
}

The sig of the HashFn is:

template <const uint32_t seed, const uint32_t size = NULL>
constexpr uint32_t Hash(const char* message)

Compilation fails with:

error C2131: expression did not evaluate to a constant

note: failure was caused by a read of a variable outside its lifetime

note: see usage of 'bytes'

I've read topics here on StackOverflow about parameters might not be able to evaluate at compile time, (that's why I switched most of my parameters to template variable, so it's 100% guaranteed they are compile time) but in this case it doesn't seem to be logical why it gives an error. The bytes value is dependent on a compile time value, also byte is a constant.

Why would it be outside of it's lifetime? If I put let's say "somestring" instead of the variable bytes then it compiles perfectly. What is not constant evaluatable here?

  • Can you make a minimal reproducible example so that it can be reproduced? Also which version of VS and MSVC are you using? – P.W Mar 26 at 9:22
  • 1
    The variable bytes is const but not constexpr. It's created and recreated and initialized each time CalculateRandomFromState is called. Can you make it constexpr instead? Then perhaps you could pass it as a template argument also? – Some programmer dude Mar 26 at 9:23
  • 1
    Can't reproduce. – HolyBlackCat Mar 26 at 9:24
  • @Someprogrammerdude Isn't it implicitly constexpr due to being const and having a constexpr initialzier? – HolyBlackCat Mar 26 at 9:25
  • 2
    @HolyBlackCat - the error appears when you actually attempt to compute the hash. – rustyx Mar 26 at 9:32
7

constexpr on a function declaration does not require all evaluation paths to lead to a constant expression. Whether or not the result of a function call is constexpr can depend on the input arguments.

Assuming your Hash function looks like this:

template <uint32_t seed, uint32_t size>
constexpr uint32_t Hash(const char* message)
{
    uint32_t rc = seed;
    for (uint32_t i = 0; i < size; ++i)
        rc += message[i];
    return rc;
}

This will evaluate to a constant expression iff message is a constant expression.

But you're invoking it with a non-constant expression:

    const char bytes[4] = {
        (state >> 24) & 0xFF,
        (state >> 16) & 0xFF,
        (state >> 8) & 0xFF,
         state & 0xFF,
    };

    constexpr auto value = Compiletime::Hash<seed, sizeof(bytes)>(bytes);

Every time Hash(bytes) is called, bytes will potentially have a different address.

You can make it work by simply declaring bytes constexpr:

template <int state, int seed>
constexpr static uint32_t CalculateRandomFromState()
{
    constexpr char bytes[4] = {
        (state >> 24) & 0xFF,
        (state >> 16) & 0xFF,
        (state >> 8) & 0xFF,
         state & 0xFF,
    };

    constexpr auto value = Compiletime::Hash<seed, sizeof(bytes)>(bytes);

    return value;
}

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