7

Say I have a class template named Compute, and another class named Function_A with a member function template:

template <typename T> void Evaluate(T parameter)

I am constrained to use the class Function_A as it is. I already know that T can only be one of two types type_1 and type_2.

Is there a way to have something similar to Compute<T> C as a member variable of Function_A instead of defining a local Compute<T> object inside Evaluate(...)? I know that this is against the philosophy of using templates, hence it is likely not possible, but can ideally be done in that case instead?

I tried to have two members Compute<type_1> C1 and Compute<type_2> C2 in Function_A, and then use them under an if (typeid(T) == typeid(type_1)) but it's a pretty hideous, and against the philosophy of using templates as well.

Just to illustrate what I mean:

template <class T>
class Compute
{
public:
  T Function_B(T parameter)
    {
      return f.eval(parameter);
    }

private:
  SomeClass<T> f;
}

And a class:

class Function_A
{
  public:
    template <typename T> T Evaluate(T parameter)
    {
      Compute<T> C; //this is very expensive!
      T value = C.Function_B(parameter);
      return value;
    }

  private:
    double SomeParameter;
    //Compute<T> C; //conceptually what I want
}
3

One thing you can do is make C static. If you have

template <typename T> void Evaluate(T parameter)
{
  static Compute<T> C; // only do this once per T now
  T value = C.Function_B(parameter);
  return T(SomeParameter)*value;
}

then when you call Evaluate with type_1 you'll have one version of the function that has C<type_1> in it that will only be constructed the first time the function is called and the same thing happens for type_2.

  • 1
    Keep in mind that you'll have to think about shared state and thread safety with this solution. Every Evaluate<T> call, even from different Function_A objects, will use the same Compute<T> object. – Kevin Mar 26 at 13:12
  • @Kevin same is true on a per-object-level for having a Compute<T> as member which is what OP intially wanted – formerlyknownas_463035818 Mar 26 at 13:15
  • 2
    @user463035818 In that case each Function_A object gets its own Compute<T>. Here there's only 1 Compute<T> (per T) shared across all Function_A objects. It's not necessarily a problem, but it needs to be considered. – Kevin Mar 26 at 13:17
  • 1
    @user463035818 Although in that case you can mitigate the concerns by having different Function_A for each thread. My solution forces all threads to share an object, so it is something to consider. – NathanOliver Mar 26 at 13:17
  • The problem works out of the box with this solution, see my above comment. – Rabah Mar 30 at 10:27
10

How about (untested):

class Function_A
{
  public:
    template <typename T> void Evaluate(T parameter)
    {
      T value = std::get<Compute<T>>(computers).Function_B(parameter);
      return T(SomeParameter) * value;
    }

  private:
    double SomeParameter;
    std::tuple<Compute<type_1>, Compute<type_2>> computers;
};

Note: std::pair would work exactly the same as std::tuple here, if you fancy the first/second semantics it adds.

Additionally, note that T(SomeParameter) is a C-style cast, which could be problematic if T is not a class type. Consider T{} or static_cast<T>().

  • Tested or not, me likes the use of the standard library to solve this – StoryTeller Mar 26 at 12:56
  • 4
    @StoryTeller of course, I'm not some kind of savage :) – Quentin Mar 26 at 12:57
  • Why use std::tuple over std::pair (the latter also has get support)? I agree that std::tuple it fits the design in principle (nothing about this is specific to having exactly two types) but I would find it worth some discussion. – Max Langhof Mar 26 at 13:30
  • @MaxLanghof well, what you said. There's no inherent "first" or "second" in there as far as the question goes, so tuple it was. – Quentin Mar 26 at 13:32
  • Oh, and using a static_cast would be better than T(SomeParameter). I was stuck trying to figure out what pointer you are dereferencing for a moment. – Max Langhof Mar 26 at 13:32

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