1

I have a model class:

public class Work
{
    public long Id { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

I want this Work.Name will be unique, so I define the DbContext:

public class MyDbContext : DbContext
{
    public MyDbContext () : base() { }
    public MyDbContext (DbContextOptions<MyDbContext > options) : base(options) { }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<Work>(entity =>
            entity.HasIndex(e => e.Name).IsUnique()
        );
    }
    public DbSet<Work> Works { get; set; }
}

And I want to test this, so I have a test like this:

[Fact]
public void Post_InsertDuplicateWork_ShouldThrowException()
{
    var work = new Work
    {
        Name = "Test Work"
    };

    using (var context = new MyDbContext (options))
    {
        context.Works.Add(work);
        context.SaveChanges();
    }

    using (var context = new MyDbContext (options))
    {
        context.Works.Add(work);
        context.SaveChanges();
    }

    using (var context = new MyDbContext (options))
    {
         Assert.Equal(1, context.Works.Count());
    }
}

( The option object contains settings for InMemoryDatabase)

I don't really know what to check, but the test failed in the Assert, not in the second SaveChanges(). The database (the context) contains two objects with the same Name.

I went over all the relevant questions, but I did not see anyone answering what I was asking.

  • 2
    The in-memory provider does not generate identity key values the way the SQL Server provider does. This could be causing your issue. See this thread for more information: github.com/aspnet/EntityFrameworkCore/issues/14646 The identity key issue is slated to be fixed in the 3.0 release I believe. – camainc Mar 26 '19 at 15:48
  • Either test against a real database in an integration suit. Or remove the test and trust that the unique constraint works. – Spotted Mar 26 '19 at 16:29
  • @camainc, so should I update my project to the ASP.NET Core 3.0 (or higher) for the unique index to work in the in-memory database? – Sasuke Uchiha Oct 13 '20 at 14:34
  • @SasukeUchiha that work item is marked "closed-fixed" so I think you should be good to use EF Core 3. As for updating your project to ASP.NET Core 3 I'm not sure if you have to do that. You'll need to check the requirements for EF Core 3. I know it's confusing. devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/… – camainc Nov 4 '20 at 17:40
1

As others pointed out InMemory database provider ignore all possible constraints.
My suggestion would be then to use Sqlite provider with "in-memory' feature, which will throw an exception for duplicate unique keys.

public MyDbContext CreateSqliteContext()
{
    var connectionString = 
        new SqliteConnectionStringBuilder { DataSource = ":memory:" }.ToString();
    var connection = new SqliteConnection(connectionString);
    var options = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<MyDbContext>().UseSqlite(connection);

    return new MyDbContext(options);
}

private void Insert(Work work)
{
    using (var context = CreateSqliteContext())
    {
        context.Works.Add(work);
        context.SaveChanges();
    }    
}

[Fact]
public void Post_InsertDuplicateWork_ShouldThrowException()
{
    var work1 = new Work { Name = "Test Work" };
    var work2 = new Work { Name = "Test Work" };

    Insert(work1);

    Action saveDuplicate = () => Insert(work2);

    saveDuplicate.Should().Throw<DbUpdateException>(); // Pass Ok
}
  • It looks promising, but at the moment I could not realize it with SQLServer or SQLite. When I succeed I will mark it as an answer. – baruchiro Mar 27 '19 at 9:18
  • @Fabio, so any update? – BorHunter Dec 2 '20 at 10:53
0

The test fails because the second SaveChanges() will throw an exception from the database that tells you that you cannot add another item because it already contains an object with that Name.

Unique constraints are not enforced silently. Instead, attempting to add a duplicate value will throw an exception when you try to do it. This is so that you can actually react to it, instead of only noticing it after the fact (when you see that the data you attempted to add is not there).

You can test that by using Assert.Throws:

[Fact]
public void Post_InsertDuplicateWork_ShouldThrowException()
{
    var work = new Work
    {
        Name = "Test Work"
    };

    using (var context = new MyDbContext (options))
    {
        context.Works.Add(work);
        context.SaveChanges();
    }

    using (var context = new MyDbContext (options))
    {
        context.Works.Add(work);

        Assert.Throws<Exception>(() => context.SaveChanges());
    }
}

You can also specify the exact exception there (I don’t remember on top of my head which exception it exactly is that is thrown there), and you can also assign it to a variable (Assert.Throws() returns the exception) and verify the exception message to make sure that this is the exact exception you expect.

  • 1
    In my sample code, the test failed in the Assert, not in the second SaveChanges(). No Exception in the SaveChanges – baruchiro Mar 26 '19 at 15:35
  • 1
    The in-memory db provider does not generate identity key values like the SQL Server provider does. You have to manage your own keys using in-memory. It is slated for a fix in the 3.0 release. – camainc Mar 26 '19 at 15:45
  • @camainc So how do you suggest writing a test to it? – baruchiro Mar 26 '19 at 15:53
  • 1
    @Baruch Make an integration test that tests against a real database. – poke Mar 26 '19 at 16:07
  • 1
    I would do what @poke suggested. It's only a test you need to run once to make sure it works. I have several tests like that in my solutions - quick one-off tests to make sure something works, then I either comment it out or take off the [test] attribute so that it is not picked up by my automatic test runner. – camainc Mar 26 '19 at 16:13

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