52

The internet is full of complains about Gitlab not caching, but in my case I think, that Gitlab CI indeed caches correctly. The thing is, that npm seems to install everything again anyway.

cache:
  key: ${CI_COMMIT_REF_SLUG}
  paths:
    - vendor/
    - bootstrap/
    - node_modules/

build-dependencies:
  image: ...
  stage: build
  script:
  - cp .env.gitlab-testing .env
  - composer install --no-progress --no-interaction
  - php artisan key:generate
  - npm install
  - npm run prod
  - npm run prod
  artifacts:
    paths:
    - vendor/
    - bootstrap/
    - node_modules/
    - .env
    - public/mix-manifest.json
  tags:
  - docker

This is my gitlab-ci.yml file (well.. the relevant part). While the cached composer dependencies are used, the node_modules aren't. I even added everything to cache and artifacts out of desperation..

5 Answers 5

93

Updated Answer (Dec 2, 2023, GitLab@^15.12 & >13)

Just like the comments received, the use of artifacts is not ideal in the original answer, but was the cleanest approach that worked reliably. Now, that GitLab's documentation has been updated around the use of cache and it was also expanded to support multiple cache keys per job (4 maximum unfortunately), there is a better way to handle node_modules across a pipeline.

The rationale for implementation is based on understand the quirks of both GitLab and how npm works. These are the fundamentals:

  1. NPM recommends the use of npm ci instead of npm install when running in a CI/CD environment. FYI, this will require the existence of package-lock.json, which is used to ensure 0 packages are automatically version bumped while running in a CI environment (npm i by default will not create the same deterministic build every time, such as on a job re-run).

  2. npm ci deliberately removes the entirety of node_modules first before re-installing all packages listed in package-lock.json. Therefore, it is best to only configure GitLab to run npm ci once and ensure the resulting node_modules is passed to other jobs.

  3. NPM has its own cache that it stores at ~/.npm/ in case of offline builds and overall speed. You can specify a different cache location with the --cache <dir> option (you will need this). (variation of @Amityo's answer)

  4. GitLab cannot cache any directory outside of the repository! This means the default cache directory ~/.npm cannot be cached.

  5. GitLab's global cache configuration is applied to every job by default. Jobs will need to explicit override the cache config if it doesn't need the globally cached files. Using YAML anchors, the global cache config can be copied & modified.

  6. To run additional npx or npm run <script> without re-running an install, you should cache node_modules/ folder(s) across the pipeline.

  7. GitLab's expectation is for users to use the cache feature to handle dependencies and only use artifacts for dynamically generated build results. This answer now supports this desire better than possible before. There is the restriction that artifacts should be less than the maximum artifact size or 1GB (compressed) on GitLab.com. And artifacts uses your storage usage quota

  8. The use of the needs or dependencies directives will influence if artifacts from a previous job will be downloaded (or deleted) automatically on the next job.

  9. GitLab cache's can monitor the hash value of a file and use that as the key so its possible the cache will only update when the package-lock.json updates. You could use package.json but you would invalidate your deterministic builds as it does not update when minor or patches are available.

  10. If you have a mono-repo and have more than 2 separate packages, you will hit the cache entry limit of 4 during the install job. You will not have the ideal setup but you can combine some cache definitions together. It is also worth noting, GitLab cache.key.files supports a maximum of 2 files to use for the key hash so you likely will need to use another method to determine a useful key. One likely solution will be to use a non-file related key and cache all node_modules/ folders under that key. That way you have only 2 cache entries for the install job and 1 for each subsequent job.

  11. GitLab's cache list unfortunately prepends the index value to the cache key it uses (this is very unintuitive!) which can affect whether or not your cache is matched between jobs. Thank you to @deanharber for bringing this up. As of 3 Dec 2023, this example has been updated to reflect the new order in the install job. The global cache entry must be first in the install job since the global cache key is actually 0_[CACHE_KEY_FOR_NODE_MODULES], and the npm cache second as it will have a key of 1_[CACHE_KEY_FOR_NPM_TARBALLS].

Solution

  • Run a single install job as .pre stage, using cached downloaded packages (tar.gz's) across entire repository.
  • Cache all node_modules/ folders to following jobs for that pipeline execution. Do not allow any jobs except install to upload cache (lowers pipeline run time & prevents unintended consequences)
  • Pass the build/ directory via artifacts on to other jobs only when needed
# .gitlab-ci.yml

stages:
  - build
  - test
  - deploy


# global cache settings for all jobs
# Ensure compatibility with the install job
# goal: the install job loads the cache and
# all other jobs can only use it
cache:
    # most npm libraries will only have 1 entry for the base project deps
    - &global_cache_node_mods
      key:
          files:
              - package-lock.json
      paths:
          - node_modules/
      policy: pull  # prevent subsequent jobs from modifying cache

#   # ATTN mono-repo users: with only additional node_modules, 
#   # add up to 2 additional cache entries. 
#   # See limitations in #10. 
#   - key:
#         files:
#             - core/pkg1/package-lock.json
#     paths:
#         - core/pkg1/node_modules/
#     policy: pull # prevent jobs from modifying cache


install:
  image: ...
  stage: .pre   # always first, no matter if it is listed in stages
  cache:
    # Mimic &global_cache_node_mods config but override policy
    # to allow this job to update the cache at the end of the job
    # and only update if it was a successful job (#5)
    - <<: *global_cache_node_mods
       when: on_success
       policy: pull-push

#   # ATTN Monorepo Users: add additional key entries from 
#   # the global cache and override the policy as above but
#   # realize the limitations (read #10).
#   - key:
#      files:
#        - core/pkg1/package-lock.json
#      paths:
#        - core/client/node_modules/
#      when: on_success
#      policy: pull-push

    # store npm cache for all branches (stores download pkg.tar.gz's)
    # will not be necessary for any other job
    - key: ${CI_JOB_NAME}
       # must be inside $CI_PROJECT_DIR for gitlab-runner caching (#3)
       paths:
         - .npm/
       when: on_success
       policy: pull-push

# before_script:
#   - ...
  script:
    # define cache dir & use it npm!
    - npm ci --cache .npm --prefer-offline
#   # monorepo users: run secondary install actions
#   - npx lerna bootstrap -- --cache .npm/ --prefer-offline


build:
  stage: build
  # global cache settings are inherited to grab `node_modules`
  script:
    - npm run build
  artifacts:
    paths:
      - dist/           # where ever your build results are stored


test:
  stage: test
  # global cache settings are inherited to grab `node_modules`
  needs:
    # install job is not "needed" unless it creates artifacts
    # install job also occurs in the previous stage `.pre` so it
    # is implicitly required since `when: on_success` is the default
    # for subsequent jobs in subsequent stages
    - job: build
      artifacts: true      # grabs built files
  # dependencies: could also be used instead of needs
  script:
    - npm test


deploy:
  stage: deploy
  when: on_success # only if previous stages' jobs all succeeded
  # override inherited cache settings since node_modules is not needed
  cache: {}
  needs:
    - job: build
      artifacts: true      # grabs dist/
  script:
    - npm publish

GitLab's recommendation for npm can be found in the GitLab Docs.


[DEPRECATED] Original Answer (Oct 27, 2021, GitLab<13.12)

All the answers I see so far give only half answers but don't actually fully accomplish the task of caching IMO.

In order to fully cache with npm & GitLab, you must be aware of the following:

  1. See #1 above

  2. npm ci deliberately removes the entirety of node_modules first before re-installing all packages listed in package-lock.json. Therefore, configuring GitLab to cache the node_modules directory between build jobs is useless. The point is to ensure no preparation hooks or anything else modified node_modules from a previous run. IMO, this is not really valid for a CI environment but you can't change it and maintain the fully deterministic builds.

  3. See #3-#4 above

  4. If you have multiple stages, global cache will be downloaded every job. This likely is not what you want!

  5. To run additional npx commands without re-running an install, you should pass the node_modules/ folder as an artifact to other jobs.

[DEPRECATED] Solution

  • Run a single install job as .pre stage, using cached downloaded packages (tar.gz's) across entire repository.
  • Pass node_modules & the build directory on to other jobs only when needed

stages:
  - build
  - test
  - deploy

install:
  image: ...
  stage: .pre         # always first, no matter if it is listed in stages
  cache:
    key: NPM_DOWNLOAD_CACHE  # a single-key-4-all-branches for install jobs
    paths:
      - .npm/
  before_script:
    - cp .env.gitlab-testing .env
    - composer install --no-progress --no-interaction
    - php artisan key:generate
  script:
    # define cache dir & use it npm!
    - npm ci --cache .npm --prefer-offline
  artifacts:
    paths:
    - vendor/
    - bootstrap/
    - node_modules/
    - .env
    - public/mix-manifest.json

build:
  stage: build
  needs:
    - job: install         
      artifacts: true       # true by default, grabs `node_modules`
  script:
    - npm run build
  artifacts:
    paths:
      - dist/               # whereever your build results are stored

test:
  stage: test
  needs:
    - job: install
      artifacts: true      # grabs node_modules
    - job: build
      artifacts: true      # grabs built files
  script:
    - npm test

deploy:
  stage: deploy
  needs:
      # does not need node_modules so don't state install as a need
    - job: build
      artifacts: true      # grabs dist/
    - job: test            # must succeed
      artifacts: false     # not needed
  script:
    - npm publish
25
  • 1
    Why did you use artifacts for node_modules though?
    – Sagiv b.g
    Commented Mar 1, 2022 at 11:38
  • 1
    @Sagivb.g, because of the caching downfall (#5), so instead if it is an artifact you can control if it is downloaded in the following jobs because it is not always needed. Secondly, I only want node_modules to exist for the current pipeline, not across pipelines, branches, etc. You can set the timeout so the artifact only exists for 12 hrs for .pre stage (I do this, but not included above) if you are worried about space. Commented Mar 4, 2022 at 1:19
  • 1
    You can set a different cache policy for jobs that doesn't need to pull or push the cache. Like pull or push only for certain jobs and no cache at all to prevent certain jobs using it. As for making it only available for a given pipeline, i guess you can provide the CI_PIPELINE_ID as the key. If your current setup works good for you then that's great, i just thought this info should be out there just in case :)
    – Sagiv b.g
    Commented Mar 6, 2022 at 7:17
  • 2
    @Sagivb.g & \@boy, answer is now updated to use cache! Thank you for the comments. Commented Jul 30, 2022 at 16:17
  • 3
    In my setup the order of the cache keys defined in the install job had to flip. Subsequent jobs were trying to retrieve the cache from 0_[CACHE_KEY_FOR_NODE_MODULES] where the install job created 1_[CACHE_KEY_FOR_NODE_MODULES]
    – deanharber
    Commented Jun 1, 2023 at 8:42
19

Actually it should work, your cache is set globally, your key refers to the current branch ${CI_COMMIT_REF_SLUG}...

This is my build and it seems to cache the node_modules between the stages.

image: node:latest

cache:
  key: ${CI_COMMIT_REF_SLUG}
  paths:
  - node_modules/
  - .next/

stages:
  - install
  - test
  - build
  - deploy

install_dependencies:
  stage: install
  script:
    - npm install

test:
  stage: test
  script:
    - npm run test

build:
  stage: build
  script:
    - npm run build

4
  • I had an install stage too until I found this gem: before_script: - if [ ! -d "node_modules" ]; then npm install; fi hope it works for ya!
    – Jacksonkr
    Commented Jul 28, 2020 at 22:10
  • slightly shorter maybe [ -d "node_modules" ] || npm install ?
    – Julien
    Commented Aug 13, 2020 at 8:45
  • 1
    @Julien This fails. Unescaped || are interpreted as a multiline block scalar indicator.
    – Federico
    Commented Apr 21, 2021 at 18:33
  • shouldn't the cache be specified only in the first "install" stage?
    – Tony
    Commented Oct 24, 2023 at 9:12
6

I had the same issue, for me the problem was down to the cache settings, by default the cache does not keep unversioned git files and since we do not store node_modules in git the npm files were not cached at all. So all I had to do was insert one line "untracked: true" like below

cache:
  untracked: true
  key: ${CI_COMMIT_REF_SLUG}
  paths:
    - vendor/
    - bootstrap/
    - node_modules/

Now npm is faster, although it still needs to check if things have changed, for me this still takes a couple of minutes, so I considering having a specific job to do the npm install, but it has sped things up a lot already.

2
  • Are you sure? The documentation for cache:paths seems pretty clear that it will include anything in those paths regardless of whether they are tracked or not. docs.gitlab.com/ee/ci/yaml/#cachepaths
    – Tyler
    Commented Jan 13, 2022 at 1:31
  • 1
    @MatrixFrog, at the time of writing I had noticed a big time saving by enabling the option. I cannot tell you more though :) Commented Jan 14, 2022 at 7:59
2

The default cache path is ~/.npm

To set the npm cache directory:

npm config set cache <path> --global

see here for more information

1
  • 6
    While this is totally not the answer to the OP's question, it still helped me. For npm-noobs: node_modules is the finished product of npm install. Like a python virtualenv maybe? I found, that my solution should be putting the npm-cache-dir into the CI-cache. Not the node_modules.
    – Chris
    Commented Feb 26, 2020 at 16:10
0

GitLab + NPM/Yarn Cache + React Firebase Hosting

stages:
  - test
  - build
  - deploy

default:
  image: node:21
  cache: # Cache modules in between jobs
    key:
      files:
        - yarn.lock
    paths:
      - node_modules/

##########################
# Firebase Preview Links #
##########################
preview_deploy:
  stage: test
  image: node:21
  # only:
  #   - merge_requests
  rules:
    - if: $CI_PIPELINE_SOURCE == 'merge_request_event' && ($CI_MERGE_REQUEST_TARGET_BRANCH_NAME == "develop")
  before_script:
    - npm install -g firebase-tools
  script:
    - yarn install --immutable --immutable-cache
    - yarn build
    - |
      echo "{\"commit\": \"https://gitlab.com/ORG/REPO/-/commit/${CI_COMMIT_SHA}\", \"ref\": \"${CI_COMMIT_REF_NAME}\", \"job\": \"https://gitlab.com/ORG/REPO/-/jobs/${CI_JOB_ID}\"}" > dist/build.json
    - firebase --project "${FIREBASE_PROJECT_ID}" --token "${FIREBASE_TOKEN}" hosting:channel:deploy "${CI_COMMIT_SHA}"
  environment:
    name: preview-staging

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