14

Take following code as an example

#include <algorithm>

namespace baz {
    template<class T>
    void sort(T&&){}
}

namespace boot {
    const auto sort = [](auto &&){};
}

void foo (){
    using namespace std;
    using namespace baz;
    sort(1);
}

void bar(){
    using namespace std;
    using namespace boot;
    sort(1);
}

I expected that since foo compiled, then bar shall compile as well. To my surprise, the foo compiles correctly and bar has problem with ambiguous call to sort function. Am I doing something illegal here or this is proper way compiler should behave? If so, why is it so different. I though generic lambda can be treated as syntactic sugar for generic function.

live example

  • 5
    Lambdas do not participate in ADL – Guillaume Racicot Mar 26 at 22:50
  • 10
    This isn't ADL. An int argument doesn't come from any namespace. – chris Mar 26 at 22:53
  • 4
    Should this really be ambiguous, though? std::sort() doesn't take 1 parameter as input, it takes at least 2, so why is the compiler even considering it as a candidate for a call that passes only 1 parameter value? – Remy Lebeau Mar 26 at 23:15
  • There must be something about the extra layer of indirection that the lambda introduces. With the first example, the call is made to ::baz::sort, but in the second example, it would have to find ::boot::mystery_lambda_type::operator(). That extra step might be what causes std::sort to be considered first. I don't have the standard in front of me so can't be sure about this. – alter igel Mar 26 at 23:22
16

The problem here is not that the call to sort is ambiguous, but that the name sort is ambiguous. Name lookup happens before overload resolution.

I believe the relevant section is [basic.lookup]/1, specifically

[…] The declarations found by name lookup shall either all denote the same entity or shall all denote functions or function templates; in the latter case, the declarations are said to form a set of overloaded functions ([over.load]). […]

In your case, the name sort denotes both, the object boot::sort as well as the set of overloaded functions std::sort. Therefore, name lookup fails.

Your code is really no different from if you had written, for example

namespace baz {
    int a;
}

namespace boot {
    int a;
}

void foo() {
    using namespace baz;
    using namespace boot;
    a = 42;  // error: reference to 'a' is ambiguous
}

Try it out here; compare this to a case that actually has an ambiguous function call; note how the error message is the same as in your case, specifically referring to the name itself being ambiguous rather than the function call.

  • 1
    I think this is actually the right answer. And I would like to add that if both the template function sort and the lambda sort were declared in the same namespace, it would be an error. You cannot have a function and non-function with the same name in the same namespace. So there could never be an overload set that has both true functions and function-like objects. – Mike Mar 27 at 1:09
  • Seems like a right answet to me. If there is something that can be done to workaround my problem I would be thankful for comment/answer edit. – bartop Mar 27 at 7:05
  • 1
    @Scheff indeed, I must've mixed up the URLs somehow. Should be fixed now. Thanks for pointing that out! – Michael Kenzel Mar 27 at 10:08
  • @bartop can you not just remove the using directives and/or use fully-qualified names, e.g., baz::sort!? – Michael Kenzel Mar 27 at 11:31
  • @MichaelKenzel Sure can, and I do it currently. Even though I still wonder if there is different way to avoid this ambiguity – bartop Mar 27 at 11:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.