10

sitting on that problem for like 2 hours now and iam getting crazy

here is the example bash script:

#!/bin/bash

exit 0;

here is the dockerfile:

HEALTHCHECK --interval=2s CMD HealthCheckTest.sh || exit 1

I still get always unhealthy.

Want i want to do is have some logic inside my bash script to determine if the container is healthy or not.

4
  • 1
    Any reason why not HEALTHCHECK --interval=2s CMD bash HealthCheckTest.sh ?
    – KamilCuk
    Commented Mar 27, 2019 at 10:54
  • it works now thank you. Every tutorial is using curl and never used a bash script i had to try stuff out
    – Loading
    Commented Mar 27, 2019 at 10:56
  • @Loading hey, I'm also having the same issue. how did you get it to work if you dont mind sharing?
    – tiredqa_18
    Commented Aug 27, 2021 at 2:37
  • as far as i remember it was with the way i called the script. Something like that (just out of my head) HEALTHCHECK --interval=2s CMD bash "HealthCheckTest.sh || exit 1"
    – Loading
    Commented Aug 28, 2021 at 12:37

1 Answer 1

7

7,000 views and no accepted answer in 4 years, figured it was still a valid question for those learning.

TL;DR The script is likely not in the container's shell $PATH, so Docker's HEALTHCHECK can't find it without passing a full or relative path.

Here's an example of the original question, recreating the failure (without the || exit 1 operator masking the exit):

Dockerfile:

FROM nginx

ADD --chmod=777 HealthCheckTest.sh .

HEALTHCHECK --interval=2s CMD HealthCheckTest.sh

HealthCheckTest.sh

#!/bin/bash

exit 0;

Then build it with docker build --tag nginx-healthcheck-broken .

The container will run (docker run nginx-healthcheck-broken), but if you type docker ps in another terminal, you'll see it says (unhealthy) under status. You can check why it's failing by using docker inspect <container sha> and look for Health, it may look like this:

            "Health": {
                "Status": "unhealthy",
                "FailingStreak": 54,
                "Log": [
                    {
                        "Start": "2023-04-14T15:26:44.650809765-07:00",
                        "End": "2023-04-14T15:26:44.70105688-07:00",
                        "ExitCode": 1,
                        "Output": "/bin/sh: 1: HealthCheckTest.sh: not found\n"
                    },

The fix is to add the path to execute it, in this example the file is in the current working directory, so you can execute it with a ./.

Dockerfile:

FROM nginx

ADD --chmod=777 HealthCheckTest.sh .

HEALTHCHECK --interval=2s CMD ./HealthCheckTest.sh

Now rebuild: docker build --tag nginx-healthcheck-fixed .

Docker should now show that the container's HEALTHCHECK status is healthy, in docker ps and docker inspect <container sha>:

            "Health": {
                "Status": "healthy",
                "FailingStreak": 0,
                "Log": [
                    {
                        "Start": "2023-04-14T15:49:08.384675853-07:00",
                        "End": "2023-04-14T15:49:08.426373825-07:00",
                        "ExitCode": 0,
                        "Output": ""
                    },

PS The reason for the || exit 1, comes from the Dockerfile reference docs.

Docker is expecting the HEALTHCHECK exit code to be either 0 (success), or 1 (unhealthy), while 2 apparently is reserved for future use. In most shells, a || operator is an OR statement, similar to an if statement, specifically if the previous command fails (any none zero exit), run this next. Adding the || exit 1 will mask the previous failure, and ensure the exit code for a failure is always a 1.

This makes more sense if you consider the command for the HEALTHCHECK might not be just a script, say like curl which exits with a 6, if the domain is non existent. The downside is that it masks the original exit code.

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