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In a nutshell I am trying for the first time to build a couple of Value Objects (VO's) and cannot resolve the this.name usage in my constructors.

I just discovered the concept of Value Objects from this article ("Convert Guard Clauses to Value Objects") and when trying to implement the sample code ran into a few problems where the author oversimplified the example. I have worked all of them out except for one last bug that is preventing the code from building with the following compiler messages:

Compilation failed due to following error(s). 

Name.java:6: error: cannot find symbol
        this.name = name;
            ^
  symbol: variable name

PhoneNumber.java:10: error: cannot find symbol
            this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
                ^
  symbol: variable phoneNumber

2 errors

Below are the four class files of my project:

Event.java

public class Event {
    public void registerVisitor (Name name, PhoneNumber phoneNumber) {
    // Do actual registration...
    } 
} 

Name.java

public class Name {
    public Name (String name) {    
        if (name == null || name.trim ().isEmpty ()) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Name was empty");
        }
        this.name = name;
    }
    //...
}

PhoneNumber.java

import java.util.regex.Pattern;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;

public class PhoneNumber {
    public PhoneNumber (String phoneNumber) {
            Pattern PHONE_PATTERN = Pattern.compile("\\d{10}|(?:\\d{3}-){2}\\d{4}|\\(\\d{3}\\)\\d{3}-?\\d{4}");
            if (!PHONE_PATTERN.matcher(phoneNumber).matches()) {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("Number invalid");
            }
            this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
    }
    //...
}

Main.java

class Main {
    public static void main (String[]args) {
        Event eventVar = new Event (); //
        Name nameVar = new Name("MyName Test");
        PhoneNumber phNumVar = new PhoneNumber("999-999-9999");
        eventVar.registerVisitor(nameVar, phNumVar);
    } 
    //... 
}

As far as "expected results" all I am trying to do is get this to successfully compile and instantiate the objects. My interest is in being able to create VO's that can work effectively as self-validating inputs.

PS: I am using JDK 8 on a Windows system.

2

Your name class does not have a field called 'name'.

public class Name {
    private final String name; //added field

    public Name (String name) {    
        if (name == null || name.trim ().isEmpty ()) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Name was empty");
        }
        this.name = name;
    }
    //...
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I saw that but when I tried to declare Name name; in the constructor it failed and when I declared String name; in the constructor it also failed. It's a real catch 22 situation. – O.M.Y. Mar 27 '19 at 14:14
  • 1
    You cannot declare a field in a constructor. They must be declared at the class scope, like I have done. this.xxx is a reference to a field. If you declared Name name in the constructor, that is a local variable, not a field. You cannot have two local variables with the same name (the other being the parameter), since there is no mechanism to differentiate them. – Michael Mar 27 '19 at 14:19
  • I feel a real Homer Simpson moment coming on ... DOH! <sheepish grin> ... I is a dummy. – O.M.Y. Mar 27 '19 at 14:38
  • @O.M.Y. Don't worry, we all make mistakes. – Michael Mar 27 '19 at 14:41
  • Thanks Michael. Selecting your answer and off to work to deal with matters less complicated than Java bugs ... people! :) – O.M.Y. Mar 27 '19 at 14:46
1

The problem is that you try to assign a value to a variable that is not declared. You need to declare name and phoneNumber as class variables

public class Name {
    private String name;

    public Name (String name) {    
        ... 
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Also you probably want to make it private, so you will need a getter for it if you want to access it from outside the Name class:

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

And the same thing in your PhoneNumber class

public class PhoneNumber {
    private String phoneNumber;

    public PhoneNumber (String phoneNumber) {
        ...
        this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
    }

    public String getPhoneNumber() {
         return phoneNumber;
    }

}

Using your current code after these modifications

public void registerVisitor (Name name, PhoneNumber phoneNumber) {
    System.out.println("Registering " + name.getName() + " | " +phoneNumber.getPhoneNumber());
}

would output:

Registering MyName Test | 999-999-9999
| improve this answer | |
  • Quite correct as you can see in my comments to Michael's answer. The only change in your code is the class variable needs to be marked final in Value Objects because the useful logic is in the constructor so using a setter method would defeat the purpose and without a setter the value should not change.. – O.M.Y. Mar 27 '19 at 14:57
  • @O.M.Y. I did not add a setter, only a getter :) and as Strings are immutable, it is effectively not possible to change its value from outside the class – Bentaye Mar 27 '19 at 15:02
  • True, but not all VO's are going to be based on String values. – O.M.Y. Mar 27 '19 at 15:04
  • @O.M.Y. fair enough! – Bentaye Mar 27 '19 at 15:05

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